Department News

Elijah Shalis, '02, Helps Forgotten Revolutionary War Hero Find Recognition

Elijah Shalis, '02 (right), with U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib

Elijah Shalis, '02 (right), with U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib

Elijah Shalis, '02, has always loved history, and when he learned that James Robinson, a slave who fought for American independence, had been all but forgotten, he worked to make sure he received the honors he deserved in the Detroit cemetery where he is buried. And that story has resonated.

Wes Dick: Judge Damon Keith's Life Was an American Dream Story

Judge Damon Keith (left) and Albion College history professor Wesley Arden Dick, September 2012

Judge Damon Keith (left) and Albion College history professor Wesley Arden Dick, September 2012

Despite the obstacles, indignities and insults he faced throughout his life, Judge Damon Keith, a longtime friend of Albion College and valued member of the Albion family, became an icon for justice and a crusader for the disadvantaged. One of the 20th century's most significant members of the federal bench, Judge Keith passed away April 28. Professor of history Wes Dick (pictured with his friend) offers a tribute.

Remembering Albion Veterans: the 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day

First-Year Seminar students in Washington, D.C.

First-Year Seminar students in Washington, D.C.
Professor of history Wesley Arden Dick and First-Year Seminar students recently visited Washington, D.C., to recognize Albion College students who served and died in "The Great War," which eventually became known as World War I and which ended with the Armistice on November 11, 1918. The group also recognized those from Albion and Albion College who made the ultimate sacrifice in World War II and Vietnam.

Student-Athletes Reflect on Their American History Research

Nathan Kellum, '19 (top), and Shane Mills, '19 look at pages of The Liberator, a 19th-century abolitionist newspaper, at a library in Philadelphia, summer 2018.

Nathan Kellum, '19 (top), and Shane Mills, '19 look at pages of The Liberator, a 19th-century abolitionist newspaper, at a library in Philadelphia, summer 2018.
"I pulled The Liberator when I was in Philadelphia, the most well-known abolition newspaper published from 1831-1865, and seeing the old worn-out pages is something I will never forget," said Nathan Kellum, '19, who along with Shane Mills, '19, pored over books and documents earlier this summer deep within the archives of libraries in Boston and Philadelphia. 

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