Albion College Welcomes Biggest First-Year Class in 12 Years

Ready to move in the Class of 2021!
First-year Albion College students moved into Wesley Hall on Friday, August 18.
First-year Albion College students moved into Wesley Hall on Friday, August 18.
First-year Albion College students moved into Wesley Hall on Friday, August 18.
First-year Albion College students moved into Wesley Hall on Friday, August 18.
Professor of English Ian MacInnes speaks during the afternoon Matriculation ceremony.
Goodrich Chapel was packed with students and families for the Matriculation ceremony.
At Matriculation, students signed their names on pages to be assembled into the Class Book.
President Mauri Ditzler speaks to the nearly 570 new Albion students at Matriculation.

August 18, 2017 | By Jake Weber

The enrollment growth of the past two years continues in 2017 for Albion College, which welcomed nearly 570 new students at today's Matriculation ceremony, 130 more than a year ago. Along with 525 first-year students, the College expects an additional 44 transfer students, an increase of more than 25 percent over last year, when classes begin on Monday, August 21.

“This is the largest group of new students since 2005,” said Director of Admission Mandy Dubiel. “We’ve been bringing in great students who are excited about their Albion education, and I think this excitement gets passed on when high school students visit campus. Albion is a great place to be, and more and more students want to be here.”

Much of Albion’s growth can be attributed to its growing appeal among students outside Michigan. Some 35 percent of the Class of 2021 comes from 23 states other than Michigan, increasing the overall out-of-state student body to 25 percent.

The Class of 2021 further demonstrates Albion’s strength in providing an ideal educational environment for a wide variety of students. Underrepresented students make up some 40 percent of the new class; coincidentally, the number of first-generation college students is also 40 percent. Albion's current student body, from first-years through seniors, now includes 30 percent underrepresented students.

"I am increasingly convinced that colleges like ours are central, perhaps indispensable, toward reaching the goal of a just society," said President Mauri Ditzler, adding in his remarks at the Matriculation ceremony, "The liberal arts is about putting it all together, applying what you've learned, and the people that will help you do that—and it's not easy—are your professors and your classmates.

"My charge to you is to pursue justice through your education," Ditzler concluded. "But to do that you have to engage yourself in a conversational and thoughtful community that breaks down boundaries."