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Nathan Wolfe

Nathan Wolfe 2015 Joseph S. Calvaruso Keynote Address

“Before It Strikes: Viral Forecasting for Pandemic Prevention”

April 23, 2015
7 p.m., Goodrich Chapel

The Indiana Jones of virus hunting, Nathan Wolfe travels the world to track, study, and eradicate the next pandemic before it strikes. One of Time's 100 Most Influential People in the World for 2011, this Viral Storm author draws on his breakthrough discoveries to tell us where viruses come from, why they spread, and how to stop them.

"Virus Hunter" Nathan Wolfe rethinks pandemic control for our globalized world. By concentrating on how epidemic diseases—such as HIV, SARS, and West Nile—all stem from human contact with infected animals, he is able to discover new threatening viruses where they first emerge. According to Wired magazine, "Wolfe's brand of globe-trotting echoes an almost Victorian scientific ethic, an expedition to catalog the unseen menagerie of the world." His debut book, The Viral Storm, is an "engrossing and fast-paced chronicle of medical exploration and discovery" (Publisher's Weekly) that takes readers from the jungles of Africa to Wolfe's state-of-the-art labs, shedding light on the often overlooked but ultimately critical field of microbiology. It was published in six languages and shortlisted for the Royal Society's Winton Prize.

Wolfe is the Lorry I. Lokey Business Wire Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University; the Founder and CEO of Metabiota, a company that specializes in microbiological research, products, and services; and the Chairman of Global Viral, a non-profit that promotes understanding, exploration, and stewardship of the microbial world. Wolfe was named a Rolling Stone "100 Agents of Change," a National Geographic Emerging Explorer, and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader. He is also the winner of the NIH Director's Pioneer Award. Wolfe has received over $60 million in grants and contracts from Google, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Defense, among others—making him a man poised to eradicate pandemics before they even happen.

Greening of the Great Lakes

Nathan Wolfe spoke with Kirk Heinze, '70, on the April 12 edition of "Greening of the Great Lakes" (WJR-AM 760, Detroit).

Carrie Booth Walling, Associate Professor

Carrie Booth WallingCarrie Booth Walling is an Associate Professor or Political Science and Associate Director of the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program. Walling teaches courses in international politics and human rights. Her research focuses on international responses to mass atrocity crimes including military humanitarian intervention and human rights trials; and how human rights norms are changing the meaning of state sovereignty at the United Nations. Walling is author of All Necessary Measures: The United Nations and Humanitarian Intervention, Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights (University of Pennsylvania Press 2013). To learn more about her book and how the stories we tell each other about violence and civil war affect UN Security Council decision-making, listen to this podcast from the genocide prevention series as part of the New Book Network.

Walling has published articles on ethnic cleansing, humanitarian intervention, transitional justice, and international human rights trials in the Journal of Peace Research, Human Rights Quarterly, International Journal of Human Rights, Civil Wars and New Global Studies. Working collaboratively with Susan Waltz (University of Michigan), Walling has launched a website on human rights advocacy and the history of international human rights standards - which she describes as is a free, online text book. She is active with the Holocaust Studies Service Learning Project at Albion College, serves on the Executive Board for the International Studies Association Human Rights Section, and is the editor for the human trafficking blog, Voices of Change for the Michigan Human Trafficking Task Force. She was awarded the Phi Beta Kappa Scholar of the Year Award in 2015 and the New Development Fellowship in 2014 for her scholarship. From January - August 2017 Walling will serve as a Visiting Research Scholar with the International Policy Center at the University of Michigan's Gerald Ford School for Public Policy. Walling's current research focuses on the relationship between the UN Security Council and the International Criminal Court.

Walling holds a Ph.D. in Political Science with a minor in Human Rights from the University of Minnesota (2008). Prior to joining the faculty at Albion in 2011, Walling was a postdoctoral fellow with the Michigan Society of Fellows at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan (2008-2011). She also holds a BA in International Relations from James Madison College, Michigan State University and Masters degrees in Strategic Studies and Political Science from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth and University of Minnesota, respectively. Walling's previous professional experience includes program and development work for Women for Women International - a non-governmental organization serving women affected by war and conflict."

Walling was awarded the Student's Choice Teaching Award by the Albion College Student Senate for excellence in teaching and advising in 2014. Learn more about Walling's teaching on human rights in this feature article, "A Matter of Conscience".

Walling teaches the following courses at Albion College:

  • PLSC 100: Introduction to Political Inquiry
  • PLSC 103: Introduction to International Politics
  • PLSC 206: Democratic Transitions
  • PLSC 207: Transitional Justice
  • PLSC 237: Controversies in Global Politics
  • PLSC 256: Human Rights
  • PLSC 301: International Organizations
  • PLSC 357: International Law and Politics
  • PLSC 372: Gender, Sex and International Politics
  • PLSC 404: Causes of War

Publications:

  • "Human Rights Norms, State Sovereignty and Humanitarian Intervention," Human Rights Quarterly, 37 (2015), 383-413.
  • "The UN Security Council and the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights," in Joel Pruce ed. The Social Practice of Human Rights (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2015), 143-165.
  • "Putting the Pieces Together: Human Rights Advocacy and the History of International Human Rights Standards," (with Susan Waltz) Human Rights Quarterly, 36 (2014), 909-915.
  • All Necessary Measures: The United Nations and Humanitarian Intervention (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013).
  • "Decision-makers in the Dock: How International Law, Trials and Human Rights Activism are Shaping the Justice Norm," New Global Studies, December 2012
  • "The Impact of Human Rights Trials in Latin America," Journal of Peace Research, 44:4 (July 2007), 427-445, co-authored with Kathryn Sikkink.
  • "Global Trends in Transitional Justice and Transitional Justice in Argentina," in Naomi Roht-Arriaza and Javier Mariezcurrena (eds.) Transitional Justice in the 21st Century: Beyond Truth and Justice (Cambridge University Press, 2006), co-authored with Kathryn Sikkink.
  • "Ethnic Cleansing" in Ken Booth (ed.) The Kosovo Tragedy: Human Rights Dimensions (Frank Cass Publishers, 2001), 47-66.
  • "The History and Politics of Ethnic Cleansing," International Journal of Human Rights, 4:3/4 (Autumn/Winter 2000).
  • "Intervention, Emancipation and Kosovo," Civil Wars, 2:3 (Autumn 1999), 65-88.
  • "What Role for Political Scientists? how to engage our neighbors, communities, students and the public in challenging political contexts," symposium co-edited with Maryam Zarneger Deloffre in PS: Political Science & Politics (forthcoming July 2017).
  • "Syria and the Responsibility to Prosecute: Norm Promotion in the UN Security Council," in Kurt Mills and Melissa Labonte, Accessing and Implementing Human Rights and Justice (Routledge Press, forthcoming).

Dyron K. Dabney, Associate Professor

Dabney will be on a leave of absence from January 2017 - April 2018.

Dyron Dabney is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science. His research and teaching interests include campaigns and elections, political parties, political participation and elite politics. While specializing in Japanese politics, Dabney's research and teaching interests invite comparative analysis of East Asian politics and culture and American politics. Dabney' present-day research is motivated and informed by interdisciplinary studies that bring into focus gendered differences in political participation and behavior. His current research projects include an examination of spousal participation effects on election campaign outcomes in Japan and the U.S., and gender and election campaign corruption in Japan and the U.S. Dabney was awarded the Professor of the Year Student Choice Award by the Albion College Student Senate in 2013.

Dabney holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Politics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He currently serves as an ASIANetwork Board of Directors member and a Japan Study Advisory Committee Member. Dabney also recently served as the Resident Director for Japan Study at Waseda University, Tokyo in 2011-2012.

William D. Rose, Professor

William Rose is a Professor and Chair of the Political Science Department.  Rose began teaching at Albion College in the Fall of 2001. His areas of interest and expertise (both teaching and research) are in contemporary legal and political theory, the history of American political and legal thought, and socio-legal studies/law and society.  The courses he teaches range from introductory courses in American politics and the history of western political thought, to upper level seminars on theories of crime and punishment, and privacy and the surveillance society. He is the founding director of Albion's academic interdisciplinary concentration in Law, Justice, and Society (see the Program Statement), and also serves as the College's 'Pre-Law' advisor.

Rose has been professionally active during his time at Albion, with long time professional memberships in the Law & Society Association, the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, & Humanities, and the American Political Science Association. In addition, he has served a three-year term (2006-2009) on the American Political Science Association's 'Teaching and Learning Committee,' and has also served as both Secretary (2007-2009) and President (2009-2011) of the Consortium of Undergraduate Law and Justice Programs.

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