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Richard Alley

2014 Joseph S. Calvaruso Keynote AddressRichard Alley

“A Brighter Light at the End of the Tunnel: The Optimistic Future of Energy and Environment”

April 24, 2014
7 p.m., Goodrich Chapel

Teacher, researcher and author Richard Alley is Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences and associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. Alley has spent 14 field seasons on great ice sheets in Antarctica, Greenland and Alaska, gathering data on climate and sea-level change. His development of future climate-change models earned him a seat on the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which was a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

Alley is past chair of the National Research Council's Panel on Abrupt Climate Change, and has provided climate-change information to top federal officials including a U.S. vice president and members and committees of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. Committed to educating the general public as well, Alley was presenter for the PBS program Earth: The Operators' Manual. He wrote a companion book for the PBS series and a popular account of climate change and ice cores, The Two-Mile Time Machine, which was named Phi Beta Kappa's Science Book of the Year in 2001.

Alley is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has earned numerous research awards, including the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, the Heinz Prize, the Revelle Medal of the American Geophysical Union and the Seligman Crystal of the International Glaciological Society. He has won four teaching awards at Penn State, and his public service has been recognized with the American Association for the Advancement of Science Public Engagement with Science Award, the Public Service Award of the Geological Society of America and the American Geological Institute Award for Outstanding Contribution to Public Understanding of the Geosciences.

Alley will receive the National Academy of Sciences' triennial Arthur L. Day Prize and Lectureship on April 27, 2014.

Nathan Wolfe

Nathan Wolfe 2015 Joseph S. Calvaruso Keynote Address

“Before It Strikes: Viral Forecasting for Pandemic Prevention”

April 23, 2015
7 p.m., Goodrich Chapel

The Indiana Jones of virus hunting, Nathan Wolfe travels the world to track, study, and eradicate the next pandemic before it strikes. One of Time's 100 Most Influential People in the World for 2011, this Viral Storm author draws on his breakthrough discoveries to tell us where viruses come from, why they spread, and how to stop them.

"Virus Hunter" Nathan Wolfe rethinks pandemic control for our globalized world. By concentrating on how epidemic diseases—such as HIV, SARS, and West Nile—all stem from human contact with infected animals, he is able to discover new threatening viruses where they first emerge. According to Wired magazine, "Wolfe's brand of globe-trotting echoes an almost Victorian scientific ethic, an expedition to catalog the unseen menagerie of the world." His debut book, The Viral Storm, is an "engrossing and fast-paced chronicle of medical exploration and discovery" (Publisher's Weekly) that takes readers from the jungles of Africa to Wolfe's state-of-the-art labs, shedding light on the often overlooked but ultimately critical field of microbiology. It was published in six languages and shortlisted for the Royal Society's Winton Prize.

Wolfe is the Lorry I. Lokey Business Wire Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University; the Founder and CEO of Metabiota, a company that specializes in microbiological research, products, and services; and the Chairman of Global Viral, a non-profit that promotes understanding, exploration, and stewardship of the microbial world. Wolfe was named a Rolling Stone "100 Agents of Change," a National Geographic Emerging Explorer, and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader. He is also the winner of the NIH Director's Pioneer Award. Wolfe has received over $60 million in grants and contracts from Google, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Defense, among others—making him a man poised to eradicate pandemics before they even happen.

Greening of the Great Lakes

Nathan Wolfe spoke with Kirk Heinze, '70, on the April 12 edition of "Greening of the Great Lakes" (WJR-AM 760, Detroit).

Carrie Booth Walling, Associate Professor

Carrie Booth Walling

Carrie Booth Walling is Associate Professor of Political Science and teaches courses in international politics and human rights. Her research focuses on international responses to mass atrocity crimes including military humanitarian intervention and human rights trials; and how human rights norms are changing the meaning of state sovereignty at the United Nations. Walling is author of All Necessary Measures: The United Nations and Humanitarian Intervention, Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights (University of Pennsylvania Press 2013).

Walling has published articles on ethnic cleansing, humanitarian intervention, transitional justice, and international human rights trials in the Journal of Peace Research, Human Rights Quarterly, International Journal of Human Rights, Civil Wars and New Global Studies. Working collaboratively with Susan Waltz (University of Michigan), Walling has launched a website on human rights advocacy and the history of international human rights standards - which she describes as is a free, online text book. She is active with the Holocaust Studies Service Learning Project at Albion College, serves on the Executive Board for the International Studies Association Human Rights Section, and is the editor for the human trafficking blog, Voices of Change for the Michigan Human Trafficking Task Force.  She was awarded the Phi Beta Kappa Scholar of the Year Award in 2015 and the New Development Fellowship in 2014 for her scholarship.

Walling holds a Ph.D. in Political Science with a minor in Human Rights from the University of Minnesota (2008). Prior to joining the faculty at Albion in 2011, Walling was a postdoctoral fellow with the Michigan Society of Fellows at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan (2008-2011).  She also holds a BA in International Relations from James Madison College, Michigan State University and Masters degrees in Strategic Studies and Political Science from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth and University of Minnesota, respectively.

Walling was awarded the Student's Choice Teaching Award by the Albion College Student Senate for excellence in teaching and advising in 2014.  Learn more about Walling's teaching on human rights in this feature article, "A Matter of Conscience".

Walling teaches the following courses at Albion College:

  • PLSC 100: Introduction to Political Inquiry
  • PLSC 103: Introduction to International Politics
  • PLSC 206: Democratic Transitions
  • PLSC 207: Transitional Justice
  • PLSC 237: Controversies in Global Politics
  • PLSC 256: Human Rights
  • PLSC 301: International Organizations
  • PLSC 357: International Law and Politics
  • PLSC 372: Gender, Sex and International Politics
  • PLSC 404: Causes of War

Publications:

  •  “Human Rights Norms, State Sovereignty and Humanitarian Intervention,” Human Rights Quarterly, 37 (2015), 383-413.
  • "The UN Security Council and the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights," in Joel Pruce ed. The Social Practice of Human Rights (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2015), 143-165.
  • "Putting the Pieces Together: Human Rights Advocacy and the History of International Human Rights Standards," (with Susan Waltz) Human Rights Quarterly, 36 (2014), 909-915.
  • All Necessary Measures: The United Nations and Humanitarian Intervention (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013).
  • "Decision-makers in the Dock: How International Law, Trials and Human Rights Activism are Shaping the Justice Norm," New Global Studies, December 2012
  • "The Impact of Human Rights Trials in Latin America," Journal of Peace Research, 44:4 (July 2007), 427-445, co-authored with Kathryn Sikkink.
  • "Global Trends in Transitional Justice and Transitional Justice in Argentina," in Naomi Roht-Arriaza and Javier Mariezcurrena (eds.) Transitional Justice in the 21st Century: Beyond Truth and Justice (Cambridge University Press, 2006), co-authored with Kathryn Sikkink.
  • "Ethnic Cleansing" in Ken Booth (ed.) The Kosovo Tragedy: Human Rights Dimensions (Frank Cass Publishers, 2001), 47-66.
  • "The History and Politics of Ethnic Cleansing," International Journal of Human Rights, 4:3/4 (Autumn/Winter 2000).
  • "Intervention, Emancipation and Kosovo," Civil Wars, 2:3 (Autumn 1999), 65-88.

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