Class Reunions

A cover letter is your face to the company. It is addressed to a person at the company when possible and always accompanies your résumé.  It is an opportunity to let your potential employer know more about you than just what is on the résumé.

Use the cover letter to express yourself, your passion for working at the company, and as an example of your writing skills. You want to reflect on how your skills and experiences match the needs and interests of your potential employer, as well as the requirements for the position. Always send a cover letter with your résumé - even if the job description does not specifically say to.

Things to keep in mind as you write a cover letter

  • Research the company of interest.  Find out about the services offered and the logistics of the job so that you can  tailor your letter to that position and company.
  • Focus on what you can do for the employer, not how this job will benefit you as an employee. What makes you stand out from other applicants?
  • The desired length of a cover letter should be one page. You may consider using the same heading on your cover letter as you did on your resume for consistency and style. This can help you stand out in the crowd.
  • Font size should be 10-12 point in Arial or Times New Roman font type consistent with style used on your résumé.
  • Salary Requirements: Visit the Career and Internship Center to review nationwide average salary data for new graduates if you are asked to include this in your cover letter.
  • Print your cover letter on the same bond paper that you used for your résumé.
  • Don't forget to sign your name at the end. Make sure to use either blue or black ink.
  • Neatness counts! Proof well for typing or grammar errors and use only clean copies of your cover letter.

The staff in the Career and Internship Center are happy to provide assistance as you develop your cover letter and provide critical review as needed.  Contact us!

ACM Chicago Program

Subjects:  The ACM Chicago Program engages students academically, professionally, and personally with the city of Chicago.  The primary areas of emphasis in the program are Arts, Entrepreneurship, and Urban Studies – students have the opportunity to explore one of these topics in depth, or participate in classwork and projects across these disciplines.  The program offers an innovative mix of academic work, including an internship, independent study project, common core course about the city of Chicago, and a variety of seminars focused on the arts and creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship, and urban studies and social justice.  Students are able to explore the vital issues facing cities and the people who live and work in them, while digging deeper to relate these issues to their personal lives, education, and career aspirations.

The program is offered in both the fall and spring semester, and students earn a full semester worth of academic credit.

Prerequisities:  2.7 GPA, junior-level standing and demonstrated maturity.

Length: Fall or Spring Semester

Credit: 4.00 Albion units (16 semester hours). 1.0 unit internship, 1.0 unit core course, 1.0 units seminar course, 1.0 unit independent study project.

Housing: Students live with other Chicago Program participants in furnished, shared apartments in various neighborhoods throughout the city of Chicago.  While locations may vary each semester, apartments are located close to public transportation and a variety of amenities.  The neighborhoods where students live are an integral part of the program, as students get involved with local community organizations and examine neighborhood issues as part of their classes.

Cost: Students pay Albion College tuition, plus the ACM program fee (which covers housing, field trips, some instructional materials, and a local transportation pass for the semester).

Costs Not Covered by Albion: Meals, travel to and from Chicago, materials and supplies, cultural events/entertainment, and miscellaneous personal expenses.  For more information, go to the ACM Chicago Program cost page

Faculty Advisors:

Laurel Draudt, Robinson 106A,
Patrick McLean, Robinson 201B,

Comments:  The ACM Chicago Program is open to students of any major.  While the internship component of the program is important, the Chicago Program offers a balanced curriculum of two classes focused on Chicago, an independent study project (ISP), and the internship.  The ISP gives students the chance to pursue a topic that relates to their personal and/or academic interests during the semester, and can take many forms, depending on the project.  For examples of recent projects, see this resource page.  The Chicago Program has a long history dating back to 1969, with over 5,000 alumni of the program.

Contact:

Emily Gaul ()
11 E. Adams Street, Suite 800
Chicago, IL 60603
Telephone: 312.263.5000
Fax: 312.263.5879
Web: http://www.acm.edu/chicago

Various federal, state, and local laws regulate the questions a prospective employer can ask you. Questions must relate to the job for which you are applying!

You have options if you are asked an illegal question

  • Choose to answer the question knowing you are providing information that isn't job related. You take the risk that a "wrong" answer could harm your chances for a position.
  • Refust to answer the question. You will be within your rights, but you may come off as uncooperative or confrontational which could put off potential employers.
  • Examine the intent behind the question and respond with an answer to this. For example, if you are asked if you are married or engaged, you might choose to respond that your personal life allows you to meet all the requirements for the position.

Questions that might be asked - illegally and legally

National Origin / Citizenship

Employers are allowed to ask if you are authorized to work in the US. They are not allowed to ask if you are a US citizen, were born in the US, or your native language.

Age

Employers are allowed to ask if you are over the age of 18. They are not allowed to ask how old you are, your birthdate, or the year your graduated from college if it isn't on your résumé.

Marital / Family Status

Employers need to know if you are able to perform the requirements of the job - including working overtime, relocating, or traveling if necessary. These questions should be asked directly. They are not allowed to ask about your marital status, children, or daycare arrangements so they can make assumptions if you are able to meet these requirements.

Affiliations

The social organizations or clubs you belong to are personal. The employer may aks if your membership in any organization might be relevant to your ability to perform the job.

Personal

Your height and weight is personal. The employer's right is restricted to knowing if you can fulfill the physical requirements of the position (e.g., lifting a 50-pound weight).

Disabilities

Employers are not allowed to ask if you are disabled or for your, or your family's, medical history. They may ask if you are able to perform the essential functions of the job and even request you demonstrate job-related functions. Once hired, companies are allowed to have you undergo a physical examination. Results are confidential with the exception that medical/safety personnel may be notified of conditions which could require medical treatment and supervisors regarding the needed accommodations.

For more information on when and how to disclose a disability, check out The National Organization on Disability and National Mental Health Center.

Arrest Record

Employers are not allowed to ask if you have been arrested but may ask if you been convicted of a crime that is resonably related to the performance of the job.

Military

Employers are not allowed to ask if you were honorably discharged from the military. They must limit their questions to the branch of service or training and education received during your time in the military.


Mentoring and Success at Albion College

Who is an Albion Mentor?

Albion Mentors are Albion alumni, friends, and parents who have successfully navigated college and careers. They enjoy the personal satisfaction of contributing to a student’s growth and the challenge of relating to today’s Albion students. Mentors play a variety of roles, from offering basic advice about a job search to sharing critical insights on career readiness. Combined with assistance from the Career and Internship Center, mentoring can create a powerful environment for student success.

Mentor/Student Relationships: Expectations and Guidelines

Overview

The Albion College mentoring program uses the strengths of the Linkedin network, Albion alumni, and supporters. The Albion Mentoring Linkedin group is a subgroup of the Albion College Official Linkedin group. You will need to be granted permission to be a part of the Mentoring group and will be expected to adhere to strong ethical standards to participate.

Mentoring Topics

Topics that may be covered within a mentoring relationship may be as simple as questions about how to communicate a skill in a resume. Students and mentors may form longer term mentoring relationships that cover choice of career, success in college, and success after college.

Getting Matched with a Mentor

The matching process will materialize in one of a few ways: the public arena of the Linkedin group or through a student reaching out to a specific mentor that is a member of the group. Public postings allow the Career and Internship Center, Alumni, and Parent Leadership offices to monitor and facilitate matches.

Steps for Connecting with a Mentor

  1. Make sure your Linkedin profile is up to date and professional.
  2. Join the Albion College Official Group on Linkedin.
  3. Request to join the Albion College Mentoring Group within the Albion College Official Group (located by clicking on the More tab and then Subgroups).
  4. Post questions or topics where you would like assistance to the group. This could be a request to be contacted by a mentor or a question for the group. Your posts may look something like the following examples:
    1. “I am a junior majoring in Communication Studies with a minor in Art. I would like to connect with someone with a similar background to help me explore career options.”
    2. “I am a sophomore majoring in Philosophy and I have not yet chosen a minor. I would like to ask the group their thoughts on this topic.”
    3. “I am looking for a mentoring relationship as I prepare for my junior year with aspirations of going to law school.”
    4. “I live in the Detroit area, and I would like to work in marketing after I graduate. Is there someone in the group that I could meet with while I am home during Thanksgiving Break?”
  5. Make sure that you always follow-up with mentor communications.
  6. When appropriate, foster a longer-term relationship by providing updates once per semester to mentors.

Mentors are not official representatives of Albion College. Make sure to exercise care and be an educated consumer of information.

Terminating the Mentor/Mentee Relationship

There is no formal process to terminate the mentoring relationship. At any time, either the mentor or the student can indicate that contact is no longer necessary. Both the mentor and the student is expected to respect the wishes of the party requesting termination.

Disney College Program - a combined education and work experience at the Walt Disney World® Resort as a cast member

Entertainment Industry Jobs - listings of entertainment jobs and internships at studios, Networks, Production Companies, Record Companies, TV and Radio Stations, VFX, Animation, and Broadcasting

American Association of Museums - post your resume and receive email alerts to jobs available at museums across the U.S.

New York Foundation for the Arts - a premier resource for jobs and internships in the arts, culture, and museum industries nationwide

ShowBizJobs - a career center dedicated to matching professional candidates and media enterprises in all phases of media production

Media 411 - matching people TV jobs and internships across the nation

 

 

We are pleased to offer you a free training system that features a new and innovative way to help you prepare more effectively for a job interview.

Big Interview is an online system that combines training AND practice to help improve your interview technique and build your confidence.

You have at your disposal a variety of tools including:

  • Challenging, virtual mock interviews for all experience levels and dozens of industries
  • A database of thousands of interview questions with tips on how to answer them
  • The ability to rate and share your interview answers for feedback
  • A comprehensive video training curriculum covering all aspects of landing a job
  • A step-by-step interview Answer Builder for crafting answers to behavioral questions

How to Register

Here is the info to set up your Big Interview account:

  1. Go to https://albion.biginterview.com/register.
  2. Complete registration process, be sure to use your albion.edu email address.
  3. You'll then receive a confirmation email. Follow the link in that email to start using Big Interview.

Share your Career Experiences and Guide Current Students on their Paths

Location: Kellogg Center 2nd Floor

Date: Friday, October 14, 2016

Time: 1:00p - 3:00p

What is Briton Career Connections?

Briton Career Connections is a great opportunity for alumni and parents to have personal conversations with students about their professional fields in a fair-style format. Attendees will be expected to talk about their career paths and offer suggestions for aspiring young professionals. This is also an ideal time to provide students with information on internships and jobs at your place of work or within your network.

Who Should Participate?

Anyone who would like to provide current students with information on their career path, company/organization or industry. Current professionals, current graduate students, and retired professionals all have very important information to communicate to students.

What is the Format of the Event?

You can choose to attend as an individual or represent your company. Participants will be provided table space that encourages networking with students and other alumni. The atmosphere will be a blend of a college career fair and networking event.

What Will/Should I Do at the Event?

As students visit your table it will be helpful if you can:

  • Recruit for jobs and internships with your company/institution
  • Provide them with information about your career path
  • Advise students about pursuing careers similar to yours
  • Discuss past experiences and what has provided a strong sense of meaning during your career
  • Discuss graduate program options and your experience
  • Communicate pointers about trends in applicable career fields
  • Provide advice regarding students’ networking/elevator speeches

Questions?

Please contact Troy Kase, Director of the Career and Internship Center at or 517/629-0332.

Sign-Up Now!

Deadline: Friday, October 7, 2016

Please enter your name.
Please enter your graduation year (if applicable).
Please enter your phone number.
Please enter your mailing address.
Please choose one.
Invalid Input
Invalid Input
Please indicate if you will need electric outlets.
Invalid Input
  
A professor speaking with a student interested in job opportunities.

The Career & Internship Center is excited to introduce Handshake, the system that will help students and recruiters come together to meet, talk, and share opportunities. Start searching for jobs

From who you are to who you’ll become.

Welcome to the Career and Internship Center at Albion College—we are committed to assisting students and alumni as you plan for and move into your future. Our staff is dedicated to helping you through the maze of information available, no matter which career path you choose. As a key component of the Albion Advantage, we work closely with faculty mentors and the College's institutes and centers to help you prepare for your next step.

facebook
Follow the Career and Internship Center on Facebook

Albion College's Career and Internship Center provides comprehensive services designed to assist students and alumni in the career exploration and decision-making process. We strive to teach students the skills necessary to be successful with their career pursuits. Get to know us!

Troy Kase, Director of the Career and Internship Center Troy Kase

Director
E-mail:

Troy joined Albion College as Director of the Career and Internship Center in February 2013. He comes to Albion from Idaho after working at the Career Center at Idaho State University for fourteen years. Troy received his Bachelor of Business Administration degree in finance and Master of Counseling in Student Affairs and College Counseling from Idaho State University, and continues to complete coursework toward a doctorate in higher education.

Dawn Hernandez, Assistant Director Dawn Hernandez

Assistant Director
E-mail:

Dawn is an Albion College alumna and Albion community resident. After graduation, Dawn pursued a career in social work in the Ann Arbor area. Several years later, she returned to the Albion area and began working at the Albion District Library. Upon completing her master's degree in Library and Information Science at Wayne State University, Dawn worked in public libraries for over a decade. Dawn brings her skills as a social worker and librarian to the Career and Internship Center to help benefit the students at Albion College.

Jenny Risner-Wade, Operations Manager Jenny Risner-Wade

Operations Manager
E-mail:

Jenny joined the Albion College Career and Internship Center in September of 2013. She graduated from Albion College in 1998 in English and a concentration in Environmental Studies. She brings a passion for helping others and an endless commitment to Albion College.

General Career Library (Yellow Labels)

Career Exploration (Yellow CE)

  • Be Bold, Cheryl L. Dorsey,
  • Career Guide for Creative & Inconventional People, Carol Eikleberry,
  • Careers for Introverts & Other Solitary Types, Blythe Camenson,
  • Cool Careers for Dummies, Marty Nemko, 3rd edition (7 copies here 3 at Stockwell)
  • Everybody Wants to go to Heaven,Steps to Organizational Excellence, Patrick McDonnell, 2002.
  • Gifts Differing, Isabel Briggs Myers,
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook,
  • Panicked Student's Guide to Choosing a College Major, Laurence Shatkin,
  • Road Trip Nation, Mike Marriner,
  • Strengths Quest, Donald O. Clifton,

Job Search (Yellow JS)

  • Confessions of a Recruiting Director, Brad Karsh, 2006
  • How Hard are you Knocking, Timothy J. Augustine, 2005 (2 copies)
  • How to Find a Job on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Google+, Brad Schepp, 2012
  • In Search of the Perfect Job, Clyde C. Lowstuter, 2007
  • The International Advantage, Marcelo Barros, 2015
  • Job Search Handbook for People with Disabilities, Daniel J. Ryan, 2011 (2 copies)
  • Job Searching with Social Media for Dummies, Joshua Waldman, 2013
  • The Path from Backpack to Briefcase, R. William Holland, 2014 (7 copies)
  • What Color Is Your Parachute?, Richard Nelson Bolles, 2014

General Career Library (Red Labels)

Advertising (Red ADV)

  • Breaking Into Advertising, Peterson's, 1998
  • Build Your Own Brand, Robin Landa, 2013
  • Careers in Advertising, S. Willaim Pattis, 2004
  • Public Relations Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan, 1993
  • Vault Career Guide to Advertising, Ira Berkowitz, 2004
  • Vault Career Guide to Marketing & Brand Management, Jennifer Goodman, 2001

Art / Performing Arts (Red ART)

  • Careers for Culture Lovers & Other Artsy Types, Marjorie Eberts & Margaret Gisler, 1999
  • Great Jobs for Music Majors, Jan Goldberg, 2005
  • Great Jobs for Theater Majors, Jan Goldberg, 2005
  • Vault Career Guide to the Fashion Industry, Holly Han, 2003

Anthropology / Sociology (Red AS)

  • Careers in Anthropology, John T. Omohundro, 1998
  • Careers in Criminology, Marilyn Morgan, 2000 (2 copies)
  • Embarking Upon a Career with Undergraduate Degree in Sociology, Janet Mancini Billson, 1998
  • Great Jobs for Anthropology Majors, Blythe Camenson, 2005
  • Great Jobs for Sociology Majors, Stephen Lambert, 1997
  • Mastering the Job Market with a Graduate Degree in Sociology, Janet Mancini Billson, 1998
  • Sociologists In the Corporate World, Delbert C. Miller, 1994
  • What Anthropologists Do, Veronica Strang, 2009

Business (Red B)

  • Great Jobs for Accounting Majors, Jan Goldberg, 2005
  • Great Jobs for Business Majors, Stephen Lambert, 2009
  • Great Jobs for Economics Majors, Blythe Camenson, 2007

English (Red E)

  • Great Jobs for English Majors, Julie DeGalan & Stephen Lambert, 2006
  • Technical Writing Careers, Jay R. Gould & Wayne A. Losano, 2000

Education (Red ED)

  • Education Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan & Joseph M. Palmisana, 1994
  • Teaching Overseas: An Insiders' Perspective, Kent M Blakeney, 2012

Event Planning (Red EP)

  • Become An Event Planner, Matthew James, 2016
  • The Business of Event Planning, Judy Allen, 2002
  • Event Planning, Judy Allen, 2000

Foreign Languages (Red FL)

  • Careers for Foreign Language Aficionados & Other Multilingual Types, H. Ned Seelye & J. Laurence Day, 1994
  • Careers in Foreign Languages, Blythe Camenson, 2001
  • Great Jobs for Foreign Language Majors, Julie DeGalan & Stephen Lambert, 2007

GAP Year (Red Gap)

  • The Back Door Guide to Short-Term Job Adventures, Michael Landes, 2002
  • Gap Year, American Style, Karl Haigler, 2013
  • The Gap Year Book, Lonely Planet, 2005
  • The Gap Year Guidebook, Samantha Wilkins, 2016
  • Taking a Gap Year, Susan Griffith, 2003

Government (Red Gov)

  • Barron's Guide to Homeland Security Careers, Donald B. Hutton and Anna Mydlarz, 2003.
  • Book of U.S. Government Jobs, Dennis Damp, 2011
  • Civil Service Career Starter, Learning Express, 1997
  • FBI Careers, Thomas Ackerman, 2002
  • Find Your Federal Job Fit, Janet M. Ruck, 2012
  • Public Administration Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan & Joseph M. Palmisano, 1994

Health/Fitness (Red H)

  • Concepts of Occupational Therapy, Kathlyn L. Reed & Sharon Nelson Sanderson, 1992
  • Great Jobs for Physical Education Majors, Nancy Giebel, 2004
  • Guide to Careers in the Health Professions, Lynne Borders Caldwell, The Princeton Review, 2000
  • Health Professions - Career and Education Directory 2006-07, American Medical Association
  • Opportunities in Fitness Careers, Mary Miller, 1997
  • Opportunities in Physical Therapy Careers, Bernice R. Krumhansl, 1993
  • Opportunities in Physician Assistant Careers, Terence J. Sacks, 1997
  • Real People Working in Health Care, Blythe Camenson, 1997

History (Red HIS)

  • Careers for History Buffs & Others Who Learn From The Past, Blythe Camenson, 1994
  • Great Jobs for History Majors, Julie DeGalan & Stephen Lambert, 2001

International (Red I)

  • Careers in International Affairs, Maria Pinto Carland & Michael Trucano, 1997
  • Directory of Jobs & Careers Abroad, Elisabeth Roberts, 2000
  • Go Global!, Stacie Berdan, 2011
  • Going Global: Singapore, Mary Anne Thompson, 2003
  • Inside a U.S. Embassy, Shawn Dorman, 2012
  • The ISS Directory of International Schools. International Schools Services, 2013-2014
  • Jobs for People Who Love To Travel - Opportunities at Home and Abroad, Ron & Caryl Krannich, Ph.D.s, 1999
  • Returning To Hong Kong, The American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong, 1995
  • Teaching English Abroad, Susan Griffith, 13th Edition, 2014
  • Work Your Way Around the World, Susan Griffith, 1998
  • Working in Tourism, Vacation Work's, 1999

Law (Red L)

  • Careers in Law, Gary Munneke, 2004
  • Inside the Law Schools, Carol-June Cassidy, 1998
  • Law School 101, R. Stephanie Good, 2004
  • Nonlegal Careers for Lawyers, Gary A. Munneke, 2006
  • Paralegal: An Insider's Guide to One of Today's Fastest-Growing Careers, Barbara Bernardo, 1997
  • Pre-Law Companion, Ron Coleman, 1996
  • The New What Can You Do with a Law Degree, Larry Richard & Tanya Hanson, 2012

Liberal Arts (Red LA)

  • Great Jobs for Liberal Arts Majors, Blythe Camenson, 2008
  • In Defense of a Liberal Education, Fareed Zakaria, 201

Ministry (Red M)

  • Answering God's Call for your Life, Robert Roth, 2006 (2 copies)
  • Let Your Life Speak, Parker J. Palmer, 2000
  • A Little Exercise for Young Theologians, Helmut Thielicke, 1962
  • What to Expect in Seminary, Virginia Samuel Cetuk, 1998
  • Who Will go for Us?, Dennis M. Campbell, 1994

Math/Computer Science (Red M/C)

  • Careers for Number Crunchers & Other Quantitative Types, Rebecca Burnett, 1994
  • Computing and Software Design Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan & Joseph M. Palmisano, 1993
  • Great Jobs for Computer Science Majors, Jan Goldberg, 1998
  • Great Jobs for Math Majors, Stephen Lambert & Ruth DeCotis, 2006
  • 101 Careers in Mathematics, Andrew Sterrett, 1996

Media/Communications (Red Med/Com)

  • Big Book 2006: Guide to the Communication Arts, Andre LaRoche, 2006
  • Book Publishing Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan, 1993
  • Breaking Into Film, Peterson's, 1999
  • Breaking Into Television, Peterson's, 1998
  • Careers in Communications & Media, Michael Shally-Jenson, 2014
  • Careers in Journalism, Jan Goldberg, 1997
  • Careers in Media, Michael P. Savoie, 2010
  • Great Jobs for Communications Majors, Blythe Camenson, 1995
  • How To Get Into The Entertainment Business, Ron Tepper, 1999
  • Magazines Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan, 1993
  • New York Film Academy, Film and Acting School, 2008-2009
  • Radio and Television Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan, 1993
  • Why Study Communication?, National Communication Association, 2015

Non-Profits (Red N)

  • Careers for Good Samaritans & Other Humanitarian Types, Marjorie Eberts, 2006
  • Careers in Fundraising, Lilya Wagner, 2002
  • Compassionate Careers, Jeffrey W. Pryor, 2015
  • From Making a Profit to Making a Difference, Richard M. King, 2000
  • A Guide to Careers in Community Development, Paul C. Brophy & Alice Shabecoff, 2001
  • How to Get a Job in the Nonprofit Sector, Michigan Nonprofit Association
  • 100 Best Nonprofits To Work For, Leslie Hamilton & Robert Tragert, 2000

Political Science (Red P)

  • Great Jobs for Political Science Majors, Mark Rowh, 2004

Psychology/Social Work (Red P/SW)

  • Careers for Caring People & Other Sensitive Types, Adrian A. Paradis, 1996
  • Career Paths in Psychology: Where Your Degree Can Take You, Robert J. Sternberg, 2007
  • Great Jobs for Psychology Majors, Julie DeGalan & Stephen Lambert, 2006
  • Mental Health and Social Work Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan & Joseph M. Palmisano, 1993
  • What Can You do with a Major in Psychology, Shelley O'Hara, 2005

Science (Red S)

  • Careers for Chemists: A World Outside the Lab; Fred Owens, Roger Uhler & Corinne Marasco, 1997
  • Careers for Scientific Types, Jan Goldberg, 2007
  • Careers in Focus: Animal Care, Ferguson, 2001
  • Careers in Science and Engineering; Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy; 1996
  • Environmental Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan & Joseph M. Palmisano, 1993
  • Great Jobs for Biology Majors, Blythe Camenson, 2004
  • Great Jobs for Chemistry Majors, Mark Rowh, 2006
  • Great Jobs for Engineering Majors, Geraldine O. Garner, 1996
  • Great Jobs for Environmental Studies Majors, Julie DeGalan, 2008
  • Great Jobs for Geology Majors, Blythe Camenson, 2007
  • Green Careers: Choosing Work for a Sustainable Future, Jim Cassio & Alice Rush, 2009
  • Guide to Nontraditional Careers in Science, Kreeger, 1999
  • Jump Start Your Career in BioScience, Chandrea B. Louise, Ph.D., 1998
  • Physical Sciences Career Directory, Bradley J. Morgan & Joseph M. Palmisano, 1994
  • Real People Working in Science, Jan Goldberg, 1998
  • The EnviroDirectory: Great Lakes 2000-2001, Environmental Marketing Group, Inc., 2000

Sports (Red SPT)

  • Career Opportunities in the Sports Industry, Shelly Field, 2004
  • Careers in Sports, Fitness, and Exercise, American Kinesiology Association, 2011
  • The Mulligan Guide to Sports Journalism Careers, Joseph F. Mulligan, 1999

Volunteer (Red V)

  • Invest Yourself - The Catalogue of Volunteer Opportunities, Commission on Voluntary Service and Action, 2003
  • A Life Inspired, Peace Corps, 2008 (4 copies)
  • So, You Want To Join the Peace Corps…, Dillon Banerjee, 2000

General Career Library (White Labels)

Internships (White IN)

  • All Work, No Pay, Lauren Berger, 2012
  • The Coffee Run, Sydney Fulkerson, 2015
  • 52 Weeks of Sales Success, Ralph R. Roberts, 2009
  • Finding Your Internship, Marvin Russell, 2013
  • Foreclosure Self-Defense for Dummies, Ralph R. Roberts, 2008
  • The Internship Manual, Sharise Kent, 2015
  • The Ultimate Guide to Internships, Eric Woodward, 2015
  • Walk Like a Giant, Sell Like a Madman, Ralph R. Roberts, 2008
  • Your Internship, Molly Abrahamson, 2015

General Career Library (Blue Labels)

Cover Letters (Blue C)

  • Dynamic Cover Letters, Katherine Hansen & Randall Hanson, Ph.D, 2001
  • How to Say It, Rosalie Maggio, 2001
  • Knock'em Dead Cover Letters, Martin Yate, 2012
  • Vault Guide to Resume, Cover Letters, and Interviewing, Howard Leifman, 2003

Employment (Blue E)

  • Life During College, Life after Graduation, 2005
  • Your Financial Future, Life after Graduation, 2005

Interviewing (Blue I)

  • Case in Point, Marc P. Cosentino, 2007
  • The Essential Digital Interview Handbook, Paul J. Bailo, 2014
  • The Essential Job Interview Handbook, Jean Baur, 2013
  • The Essential Phone Interview Handbook, Paul J. Bailo, 2011
  • Five Minutes to a Higher Salary, Lewis C. Lin, 2015
  • How to Dress for Success- DVD
  • Interview Like Yourself (No, Really!), Jezra Kaye, 2014
  • Knock'em Dead Job Interview, Martin Yate, 2013
  • Powerful Phrases for Successful Interviews, Tony Beshara, 2014
  • 60 Seconds & You're Hired, Robin Ryan, 2016

Leadership (Blue L)

  • Coaching Skills: A program aimed at enhancing your ability to support others, 2009
  • The 5 Levels of Leadership, John C. Maxwell, 2011
  • Leadership and Self-Deception, The Arbinger Institute, 2010

Networking (Blue N)

  • How to Build the Ultimate LinkedIn Profile in Under an Hour, Andrew Macarthy, 2013
  • LinkedIn in 30 Minutes, Melanie Pinola, 2013
  • Make Your Contacts Count, Anne Baber and Lynne Waymon, 2007

Resumes (Blue R)

  • The Infographic Resume, Hannah Morgan, 2014
  • Knock 'Em Dead Resumes, Martin Yate, 2012
  • Modernize Your Resume, Wendy Enelow, 2016

Graduate School Library (Green Labels)

Financing (Green FIN)

  • Dan Cassidy's Worldwide Graduate Scholarship Directory, 5th ed., Dan Cassidy, 2000
  • Don't Miss Out: The Ambitious Student's Guide to Financial Aid, Robert & Anna Leider, 1994-1995
  • Grants for Graduate & Postdoctoral Study, Peterson's, 1998

Exploration and applying to Grad School (Green GRAD)

  • The CV Book, James Innes, 2012
  • CV Handbook, Will Coghill-Behrends & Rebecca Anthony, 2011
  • Grad's Guide to Graduate Admissions Essays, Colleen Reding, 2015
  • Graduate Admissions Essays, 4th Edition, Donald Asher, 2012
  • GRE Premium, 2015, Princeton Review
  • GRE Premier, 2016, Kaplan
  • GRE Study Guide, 2014
  • How to Prepare Your Curriculum Vitae, Acy L. Jackson & Kathlen Geckeis, 2003
  • How to Write a Winning Personal Statement-Peterson's, Richard Stelzer, 1997 (2 copies)
  • How to Write the Perfect Personal Statement, 4th Edition, Petersons, 2009
  • How to Write the Perfect CV, M.E. Brandon, 2013
  • Personalize Your Grad School Essays, Michelle Hubbard, 2014
  • The PhD Factory, Goldman & Massy, 2001

Law (Green LAW)

  • How to get into the Top Law Schools, Richard Montauk, 2011
  • Law School Essays, Princeton Review, 2008
  • LSAT: Endurance Practice, Kaplan, 2010
  • LSAT: Mastery and Timing Practice, Kaplan, 2010
  • Stern-Wilson Book of Law School Lists, Gerald Wilson, 2016

Masters Business Administration (Green MBA)

  • Great Applications for Business School, Paul Bodine, 2011
  • MBA Admissions Strategy, Avi Gordon, 2010

Medical (Green MED)

  • The Best 167 Medical Schools, Princeton Review, 2015
  • Get Into Medical School, Kaplan, 2011
  • The Medical School Admissions Guide, Suzanne M. Miller, 2012

Graduate Programs Guides Set (No Labels)

  • Peterson's 2015 Graduate Programs: An Overview
  • Peterson's 2015 Graduate Programs in the Biological/Biomedical Sciences & Health-Related Medical Professions
  • Peterson's 2015 Graduate Programs in Business, Education, Information Studies, Law, and Social Work
  • Peterson's 2015 Graduate Programs in Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • Peterson's 2015 Graduate Programs in the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
  • Peterson's 2015 Graduate Programs in the Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Agricultural Sciences, The Environment & Natural Resources

Encyclopedia of Associations - 3 volumes, Gale 46th Edition, 2008 (No Labels)

Encyclopedia of Associations: Regional, State, and Local Organizations-Great Lakes States, 1 volume, Gale 16th Edition, 2006 (No Labels)

Subjects: Founded in 1970, Chicago Center extends the classroom walls for students from all majors by providing professional internships and experience-based seminars. Internships are available in all fields and are tailored to each student’s professional goals and academic requirements. Chicago Center seminars are unique learning experiences that take place in the heart of Chicago’s neighborhoods, highlighting the diversity of America’s third largest city. Students earn a full term worth of credit for the internship and seminar experience.

Chicago Center provides housing to all students and introduces them to city living during a two-week orientation. Student housing is located in Hyde Park, a beautiful lakefront community that is home to Chicago Center’s office and staff. Hyde Park is also home to the University of Chicago.

Prerequisities: 2.7 GPA, junior-level standing and demonstrated maturity.

Length: Fall semester, spring semester, or Summer.

Credit: 4.00 Albion units (16 semester hours). Two Albion College units for academic course work, two Albion College units for internship.
2.00 Albion Units for Summer program. (1 academic unit + 1 internship unit).
1.00 Albion Unit for Post Term

Housing: Chicago Center provides apartment style housing and a food budget to all students. All apartments are located in Hyde Park and are shared with other students in the program. Apartments are fully furnished and include Wi-Fi, laundry, and cable. Students are just blocks from the neighborhood shopping district and beautiful Lake Michigan.

Cost: Albion College tuition, room and board charges cover the Chicago Center program tuition, room, board, and program fees. The Chicago Center program fees include room, board, cultural events, texts, all in-city transportation and class fees. For summer and post-term students, the Albion College summer school tuition covers the tuition charges. The City Activity Expense fee is billed directly to the student, who then pays Chicago Center.

Costs Not Covered by Albion: $100 security deposit, City Activity Expense $300. For the summer: Program fee of $2,940 and City Activity Expense of $200. For the post-term: Program Fee of $1440 and City Activity Expense of $100.

Faculty Advisors:
Dr. Drew Christopher, 325B Olin,
Dr. Suellyn Henke, Olin 224,

Comments:Students intern full-time three days a week during the semester and four days a week during the summer. All students interview at multiple internship sites before making their decision and have access to Chicago Center’s extensive internship database. Class sizes are small (7-12) and allow for robust group discussions and personal feedback from instructors. The program is oriented toward understanding the diversity of experience in an urban setting, and allows students to engage with the city professionally and academically.

Contact:
Lane Chesebro
Director of Admissions and Student Affairs
Chicago Center
1515 E. 52nd Street, 2nd Floor
Chicago, IL 60615
Telephone: 773/363-1312
Fax: 773/363-5888
Toll-Free: 800/747-6059
Web: http://www.chicagocenter.org

There are many ways to select a major. Two common ways include:

  • Have a dream career in mind and select a major that would help you get there.
  • Select a major because you are interested in the subject then figure out how it relates to a career.

Choosing a major involves gathering information about yourself AND about majors and careers

Learn about yourself

  • What are your interests? What do you do in your spare time? What kinds of courses do you find fascinating? Which classes do you enjoy?
  • In which areas do you naturally excel? What comes naturally for you?
  • What are your values – make money, help people, be a leader, be creative?
  • Are you willing/able to attend graduate school if needed?
  • What do your family and friends see as your greatest strengths?
  • Consider taking self assessment tests in the Career and Internship Center to learn more about yourself.

Learn about majors and careers

  • Ask your advisor and other faculty to share information about a major and required coursework.
  • Ask upperclassmen in various majors about their experiences.
  • Read about major courses in the course catalog. What looks interesting?
  • Visit the Career and Internship Center to talk with a career counselor.
  • Sample some course offerings in your area of interest.
  • Research careers of interest in the Career Resource Center, on the “What can I do with this Major?” page, and do a general online search.
  • Explore experiential learning opportunities in an area of interest. The staff in the Career and Internship Center can assist you in the process of finding and securing a wide range of opportunities.

Resources for information on Majors

Not all majors identified in these sites are available at Albion College. These are links to web sites that are not under the control of Albion College or the Career and Internship Center. We are not responsible for the contents of any linked site. The Career and Internship Center provides these links merely as a courtesy. The data contained in this web site is for informational purposes only and is not represented to be error free.

Remember

  • Compare the information you are learning about majors and professions with what you know about yourself and the self assessment information. Do you have the qualities and interests that match the characteristics of certain majors?
  • Choosing a major does not dictate what you will do for the rest of your life! Increasingly people see their major as a starting point upon which they can grow as their interests and skills develop.
  • If you are interested in several areas of study, consider a double major, minor, or concentration. You can take classes, join a club, or even volunteer in areas you enjoy as well to feed your passions.

 

Career and Internship Center staff are here to help!

The Career and Internship Center is located in the Ferguson Building, Suite 103.

Please use the form below to submit your comments or questions, or to schedule an appointment.

**Please allow our office one business day to respond to your request.  We will do our best to give your request prompt attention and scheduling as your preferences indicate.  If you do not receive an email response, please check your SPAM folder, then email or call the office indicating you are following up on your initial contact.** 

Invalid Input
Invalid Input
Invalid Input









Invalid Input


For appointment requests, please indicate day and time preferences.


First Preference:

Invalid Input
Invalid Input


Second Preference:

Invalid Input
Invalid Input


Third Preference:

Invalid Input
Invalid Input
Invalid Input
  

Office Hours

Monday-Friday: 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Campus Address

Albion College
Career and Internship Center
611 East Porter Street
Albion, MI 49224

Contact Information

Phone: 517/629-0332
Fax: 517/629-0578
E-Mail:

Although most of your job search letters will be written to seek out employment opportunities, there will be occasions that will require other forms of correspondence. These too should be prepared carefully and professionally.

Networking Letter

This letter is designed to generate informational interviews - not job interviews. During informational interviews you can meet with individuals who may be able to give you information about your intended career. Informational interviewing is a valuable way to research job markets, define career goals, and possibly uncover vacancy information.

A resume is not typically attached to a networking letter - again your goal with informational interviewing is not to interview for a job, but to gain information that may help you in your job search. However, during your informational interview, you may want to bring your resume in order to assist the interviewer in helping you answer questions or further clarify goals.

Thank You Letters

This is one of the most important, yet least used forms of correspondence. It is used to establish goodwill, express appreciation, and strengthen your candidacy. Make sure that everyone who helps you in your job search receives a thank you letter. When used to follow up a job interview, try to send your thank you letter (or email) within 24 hours.

This letter should be brief and concise. Make sure to restate your interest in the position, reemphasizing your qualifications and expressing your sincere appreciation for the interview.

Acceptance Letter

This letter is used to accept a job and confirm the terms of your employment (salary, starting date, etc.). Most often this letter follows a telephone conversation during which details of the offer and terms of employment are discussed. Some employers will specifically request that you respond in writing. Even when this is not the case, write a formal letter of acceptance to project your professionalism and avoid any confusion about your employment.

Withdrawal Letter

Once you accept a position, you have the obligation to inform all other employers of your decision, and to withdraw your application from consideration. Express appreciation for the employer's consideration and state simply and cordially that you have accepted other employment.

Letter of Decline

Employers aren't the only ones who send rejection letters. You may decide to decline job offers that don't fit your personal objectives and interests. Rejecting an offer should be done tactfully and thoughtfully. Indicate that you have given the offer careful consideration and have decided not to accept it. Be sure to thank the employer for the offer and for considering you as a candidate.

Your Address
City, State, Zip Code
Phone
E-Mail

Date

Name of Individual
Title of Individual
Name of Organization
Address
City, State, Zip Code

Dear Ms. / Mr. / Dr.________:

Opening Paragraph: Attract attention.  Clearly state the reason for writing; name the position or type of work you are applying for.  Identify how you heard about the opening, or how the employer’s name was obtained (i.e., Albion College Career and Internship Center; Professor Smith in the English Department at Albion College; etc.).  Introduce your themes.

Second and Third Paragraphs: Outline your strongest qualifications that match the position requirements based on the themes you selected.  As much as possible, provide evidence of your related experiences and accomplishments.  Describe what you can do for the employer, rather than what they can do for you.  Point out your specific achievements and unique qualifications that are relevant to the position.  Try not to state information using the same words you used in the resume.

Fourth Paragraph: Suggest an action plan.  Make reference to your enclosed resume and restate your interest by indicating your availability for a personal interview.  Either suggest a time or state your willingness to come at the convenience of the individual employer.

Fifth Paragraph:  Express appreciation to the reader for his or her time and consideration.

Sincerely,

(Signature)

Full Name

 

Enclosure

CIEE Teach Abroad - CIEE offers paid teaching positions for university graduates looking to share their language and culture while immersing themselves in new communities around the world.

GreatSchoolJobs.com - If you´re looking for a job in education, completing the short-form profile (5 minutes) puts your basic credentials along with your attached Word.doc/txt resume in front of more than 18,000 districts throughout the country.

K12JobSpot - Job seekers can search a broad database of employment opportunities thoroughly and efficiently, based on geography, school district, and type of position.

MIREAP - Michigan REAP is a free service designed to help educators find new and exciting teaching jobs, administrative jobs and other related service positions in Michigan.

SchoolSpring.com - SchoolSpring.com scours the web for job postings from around the country and bring them together in one easy search

Southern Teachers Agency (STA) - STA helps nearly 600 private and independent schools in the Mid-Atlantic and Southern states hire teachers. These schools offer small classes, supportive and collegial faculty cultures.

Teachers-Teachers.com - Teachers-Teachers is a free service designed to help educators find new and exciting teaching jobs, administrative jobs and other related service positions.

As an Albion College alumnus, you understand the value of the Liberal Arts education of Albion College and the quality of our graduates. You are in the position to provide network resources for others needing assistance.

The Career and Internship Center assists employers in connecting with Albion College students and the campus. If you are in search of an intern or employee, please consider students and alumni from Albion College. For further information on the services provided to assist employers, please visit the Employers section of this site or contact the Career and Internship Center for assistance.

BackDoorJobs.com - short-term job adventures in the US and across the world

Cool Climate Jobs - climate change, renewable energy, and green collar jobs in the US and around the world

Environment Career Organization - linking high quality candidates with green jobs to make a better world

Green Dream Jobs - internship and career opportunities at any skill level around the world

The Great Lakes Stewardship Network - conservation related job board.

North American Association for Environmental Eduation - internship and job links for people interested in teaching the world about the environment

U.S. Department of Energy - clean energy jobs in the public, private, and non-profit sectors

You can gain experiences that enhance your education in many ways.  Course credit internships, paid work experiences, volunteer work, even summer jobs near the bottom of the office heirarchy can provide valuable exposure to the type of work you are considering as a career.  Experiential learning can assist you in determining what you like and don't like about a career and creat networks that are invaluable for graduate school recommendations and job opportunities.

The National Association of Colleges and Employers has information on commonly referenced formal experiential opportunities:

Internships, Co-ops, Practicums, and Externships: What's the Difference?


The Importance of Experiential Learning

Graduate schools often look to relevant experience during college years to demonstrate your knowledge and commitment to your chosen field of advanced study. Experiences beyond classwork assist you in connecting theoretical academics with the real world. Letters of recommendation from internship mentors may be key to acceptance into a graduate program.


Why Experiential Learning?

Experiences beyond the classroom are often essential in securing a job in your field after graduation.  Research from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) identifies employers place a high value on experiential learning as those seeking their first job. Recent Albion College graduates say the number one resource they used to find a job was networking through an internship or prior job.

Read more from NACE:

Employers Seek Experienced Workers: Internship Experience Counts

Graduate schools often look to relevant experience during college years to demonstrate your knowledge and commitment to your chosen field of advanced study. Experiences beyond classwork assist you in connecting theoretical academics with the real world. Letters of recommendation from internship mentors may be key to acceptance into a graduate program.

Experiences beyond the classroom are often essential in securing a job in your field after graduation.  Research from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) identifies employers place a high value on experiential learning as those seeking their first job.  Recent Albion College graduates say the number one resource they used to find a job was networking through an internship or prior job.

To read more from NACE -

Employers Seek Experienced Workers: Internship Experience Counts

Albion College is interested in what happens to our students once they graduate. Each year the Career and Internship Center surveys graduates to gather information on what they are doing in the areas of employment, graduate / professional school, and volunteer service. This information is used by the Career and Internship Center and other departments at Albion College to continue to change and improve the services we provide our students and alumni.

First Destination Reports

pdf Class of 2015

pdf Class of 2014

pdf Class of 2013

pdf Class of 2012

pdf Class of 2011

pdf Class of 2010

pdf Class of 2009

pdf Class of 2008

pdf Class of 2007

pdf Class of 2006

pdf Class of 2005

New Graduates

We want to include you in our next First Destination Report! Please make sure to check your Albion email in the fall for the survey request.

Ten Years Out

The College also recently completed a survey of the class of 2001 to see where alumni are on their career paths ten years after graduation. The results are part of a new brochure that includes profiles of recent alumni and describes the benefits of an Albion hands-on educaiton.

pdf View the brochure

Fifteen Years Out

Recently, Albion graduates without higher degrees who completed a PayScale.com survey reported a mid-career (approximately 15 years' experience) median salary of $79,100. This compares favorably to many schools in the Midwest as well as liberal arts colleges nationally.

See PayScale's list for Midwestern colleges and universities

See PayScale's list for national liberal arts colleges

How you'll know you're on the right track.

You have several steps to take and some careful planning to do. Whether you're a first-year or a senior, we'll help get you on the right path. See the articles below for helpful information, and schedule an appointment with the Career and Internship Center.

Freshman Year: Self-Assessment & Career Planning

It is important to begin career planning early in your college career. Knowing how your interests relate to a potential career will assist you as you choose to decide on your academic focus while at Albion College.

  • Meet with a Career and Internship Center staff member to learn how to develop and implement a personalized 4-year career plan.
  • Assess personal interests, characteristics, strengths and values through career assessments.
  • Visit the Career Resource Center in the Career and Internship Center to research various career fields and experiential opportunities such as internships.
  • Actively participate in the First-Year Experience seminar.
  • Check out the resources on choosing a major to learn about a variety of career opportunities.
  • Get involved! Join a student organization, volunteer, and/or get an on-campus job.
  • Register for core requirements and elective classes to investigate academic majors of interest. Visit with your faculty advisor for assistance in choosing classes.
  • Get a summer job that will provide you with an opportunity to learn about a career field that interests you.

Get to know the staff in the Career and Internship Center and use all our resources to your advantage!

Sophomore Year: Career Exploration & Leadership Development

In your second year, it is even more important that you are looking toward the future. You will declare your major and need to be actively searching for experiential learning opportunities.

  • Meet with a Career and Internship Center staff member to discuss your career plans and re-evaluate your personalized 4-year career plan.
  • Continue to research career fields that interest you.
  • Register with professional networks to begin connecting with experts in areas of interest. Try LinkedIn.
  • Attend a Career and Internship Center workshop to learn about the process of choosing a major or career path and attend programs featuring guest speakers from career fields that interest you.
  • Conduct informational interviews with professionals to learn about a particular career field.
  • Complete your core academic requirements.
  • Meet with your faculty advisor to choose a major.
  • Take an active role in a student organization to develop your communication, teamwork and problem-solving skills.
  • Explore experiential learning options.
  • Develop the materials needed to apply for experiential learning opportunities such as internships.
  • Secure an internship, on-campus job or summer employment related to your career goals.

As you become more active in seeking experiences to complement your academic learning, continue to utilize the resources and expertise of the staff in the Career and Internship Center Office!

Junior Year: Career Goal Setting, Gaining Experience & Graduate School Planning

By your third year, you should have laid the groundwork for your future. You have chosen a major and are active in adding experiences to complement your studies. At this time all the experience and information you have gathered should be crystallizing into solid career goals and plans.

  • Meet with a Career and Internship Center staff member to formulate your job or graduate school search timeline and plans.
  • Focus and set career goals based on what you have learned about you, your interests, and possible professions.
  • Discuss your career plans with your faculty advisor.
  • Explore and make arrangements for off-campus study and internship options.
  • Consider applying for scholarships and fellowships found in the Career and Internship Center and in Graduate School Financing.
  • Join student chapters of professional organizations to gain career information and to start networking.
  • Research graduate/professional school possibilities, their application procedures and deadlines. Many resources are available through the Career and Internship Center, including Peterson's Graduate and Professional School Guides.
  • Pick up a GRE, LSAT or MCAT packet in the Career Development Office.
  • Register and prepare for admission tests such as the GRE, LSAT and MCAT.
  • Participate in career fairs and career related events to explore your options and network with potential employers.
  • Get to know faculty members in your major.
  • Take on leadership roles on and off-campus.
  • Get professional experience through on-campus research, an internship, on-campus employment, volunteer work or a summer job.

Use all of your resources, including the Career and Internship Center. You are not alone in this process!

Senior Year: Implementation & Transition

At long last - you have achieved your last year at Albion College. It is more critical than ever that you use your resources well, stay organized, and keep your eye on the ball.

  • Meet with a Career and Internship Center staff member to design a job search strategy or finalize your graduate/professional school search timeline and plans.
  • Ask faculty and employers to provide references for you.
  • Revise and update your resume and draft a cover letter. For graduate school, complete your personal statement.
  • Mail your applications to graduate schools.
  • Prepare for graduate school or job interviews with a mock interview in the Career and Internship Center.
  • Complete an internship or career-related work experience if you haven’t already.
  • Formulate an alternate “Plan B” in case you need to make last minute career adjustments.
  • Assist your student organization transition from your leadership to the upcoming leaders in the group.
  • Begin to research companies/organizations and the career opportunities they offer.
  • Participate in career fairs and build your network of contacts in your field of interest.

Most importantly - use all the expertise and resources Albion College has to offer as you transition to career or graduate school following graduation!

Graduates

Even though you graduate, it isn't too late to utilize the resources of the Career and Internship Center. As alumni, you are welcome to contact us at any time for assistance!

It is important to begin career planning early in your college career. Knowing how your interests relate to a potential career will assist you as you chose decide on your academic focus while at Albion College.

  • Meet with a Career Development staff member to learn how to develop and implement a personalized 4-year career plan.
  • Assess personal interests, characteristics, strengths and values through career Self-Assessment Tests.
  • Visit the Career Resource Center in the Career and Internship Center to research various career fields and experiential opportunities such as internships.
  • Actively participate in the First-Year Experience seminar.
  • Check out the resources on choosing a major to learn about a variety of career opportunities.
  • Get involved!  Join a student organization, volunteer, and/or get an on-campus job.
  • Register for core requirements and elective classes to investigate academic majors of interest.  Visit with your faculty advisor for assistance in choosing classes.
  • Get a summer job that will provide you with an opportunity to learn about a career field that interests you.

Get to know the staff in the Career and Internship Center and use all our resources to your advantage!

NEXT: Sophomore Year: Career Exploration & Leadership Development

America Job - a federal and state government job search

Foreign Service Officer at the U.S. Department of State - Requirements and openings

GovernmentJobs - job opportunities in the public sector

Partnership for Public Service - non-profit, nonpartisan organization providing information on internship and job opportunities in the federal government

United Nations - Information on the on-line recruiting system for positions in the United Nations

USA.gov - the federal site for federal, state, and local government jobs

USAJobs - Federal government opportunities for employment across the world

Student Jobs - internships, training opportunities, and positions for students

The decision to pursue graduate school is multifaceted.

  • Do you want to pursue graduate education directly from Albion College or do you want to work prior to continuing your education?
  • What field of graduate study interests you?
  • Which school is a good fit for your chosen field of study?

Use all the resources available to determine what you want to pursue in graduate school and the best places to do that work. Don't forget all the resources on campus—Albion faculty and alumni are often forgotten as people explore options.

See the articles below for helpful information, and don't hesitate to schedule an appointment with the Career and Internship Center for further help and insight on your graduate school decision.

Fellowships

The question of graduate school financing is one that needs careful consideration. Here are a few places to start when searching for financial help with graduate school.

Internet Resources for Locating Funding

View fellowship and scholarship listings received by the Career and Internship Center

 

Note: Many graduate schools offer fellowships, assistantships, and scholarships that help cover the cost of tuition. Contact your graduate program to determine financial aid opportunities specific to their students.

Graduate school admission testing is required by many schools. Preparing for these tests is critical!

The Career and Internship Center has many resources available to assist you as you prepare to take required graduate school tests.  information and registration forms on the GRE, LSAT, GMAT, MCAT, and TOEFL tests are maintained in the Career Development office.  Contact the staff in Career Development and visit the Career Development Resource Center for assistance.

Main information sites for graduate school testing

  • GRE - Graduate Record Examination
  • LSAT - Law School Admissions Test
  • GMAT - Graduate Management Admissions Test
  • MCAT - Medical College Admissions Test

Study programs available for purchase

  • The Princeton Review - test preparation in GRE, LSAT, GMAT, MCAT and more
  • Peterson's - testing preparation, test dates, and resources for the GRE
  • Kaplan - test preparation in GRE, LSAT, GMAT, MCAT
  • ETS (Educational Testing Service) - GRE and TOEFL test preparation

Free resources on graduate school testing

  • Michigan eLibrary - free resource from the Michigan eLibrary that hosts practice tests for common graduate school admissions tests
This page contains links to web sites that are not under the control of Albion College or the Career and Internship Center. We are not responsible for the contents of any linked site. The Career and Internship Center provides these links merely as a courtesy. The data contained in this web site is for informational purposes only and is not represented to be error free.

 

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE
*This page contains links to web sites that are not under the control of Albion College or the Career and Internship Center. We are not responsible for the contents of any linked site. The Career and Internship Center provides these links merely as a courtesy. The data contained in this web site is for informational purposes only and is not represented to be error free.

Don’t forget to prepare for one of the most vital pieces of your application – whether for an internship, graduate school, or job. This is your chance to show your professionalism, interest in the position, and answer questions that may arise from your other application materials. Preparation for an interview is vital!

The Career and Internship Center is available to assist you in preparing for an interview. Mock interviews allow you to think on your feet as you face questions, see your body language, and consider annoying habits before you face the interview. Contact us for an appointment.

Get the answers to ace the interview

Albion sees alumni returning to campus for a multitude of reasons – to give back to the campus in some way, to enjoy the intellectual atmosphere, to listen to the lectures, reconnect with the faculty and staff, and because it is a special place to all who have spent time here.

How We Can Assist You

The Office of Career and Internship Center understands that career development is a lifelong process. As a Briton alumnus, you are welcome to all the services that a current student may access. See our information on graduate schools, job searches, résumé and cover letter development, and much more!

If you need assistance with developing your career or are anticipating a career change, contact our office.

How You Can Assist Other Brits

In these tough economic times, everyone needs assistance in establishing a career. We ask that you, as an alumnus, consider how you can assist current students as they prepare for their future. Please review the information on this website and consider offering your insights about your career field as a mentor or alumnus panel participant, consider Albion students for internship or other experiential learning opportunities, and/or keep Albion graduates in mind for job openings.

We look forward to your continued involvement with Albion College and commitment to our students!

Welcome, Students!

The Office of Career and Internship Center strives to help you answer the question, “What will you do with a liberal arts education?”

There is no one answer to this question, just as there is no one goal in life for all Albion College students. The Office of Career and Internship Center is available to all students to support you in finding your path through college that will lead you to your next steps in life. The professional staff will assist you as you find your passion and realize your full potential.

We Can Help!

Career and Internship Center staff provides services for students deciding on a major, looking for internships, preparing for graduate school, seeking a professional job, and life after Albion.

We look forward to helping you – whether you are a freshman or a senior. Make an appointment or come in during Walk-in Hours and work with us.

The Career and Internship Center assists employers in connecting with Albion College students and the campus.fiske2014-140

About Our Students

Albion College has a tradition of producing quality graduates trained in the liberal arts tradition in a setting which supports and encourages the practical aspects of professional preparation. The liberal arts curriculum, along with the many experiential learning opportunities available here (including internships, externships, off-campus programs, and professional concentration programs) provides Albion students with an exceptional education. It emphasizes the development of their critical thinking abilities, problem-solving, communication and leadership skills. Perhaps most important in today's world, Albion College graduates are well-trained in the process of learning.

Connect with Students

Employers are encouraged to come to campus and meet out students in person through on-campus recruiting. Want to do more than just post a job for students to apply? Do you want to develop a relationship with the students and faculty on campus? Contact the Career and Internship Center for ideas for connecting your organization with Albion talent and use Albion's online recruiting tool.

Special Note Regarding Unpaid Internships

  • Reference the FLSA Fact Sheet #71 to see if the intern must be paid the minimum wage and overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act for the services that they provide to “for-profit” private sector employers.
  • Consider the socioeconomic background of interns that cannot afford to accept an unpaid internship.  We hope that you will consider providing opportunities to all students and not just those that have the money to take unpaid positions.

DevJobs - Provides international job announcements on various development fields

4International Careers & Jobs - leading international employment directory for overseas jobs

Global Career Center - International database for positions around the globe

graduate-jobs.com - a leading independent graduate job board in the United Kingdom.

Jobs Abroad - Job opportunities around the world

iHipo International Careers - International jobs and internship opportunities

InterExchange - International exchange programs, internships, summer jobs, and all forms of global work

Search Jobs Abroad - opportunities for people wanting to work for an international company or in a job overseas and advice for making the transition

BritNetworkHandshake

Handshake helps students and recruiters come together to meet, talk, and share opportunities. Create a profile and access thousands of jobs and internship opportunities in your areas of interest!

jobpursuit-logoJob Pursuit: The Interview Fair

Friday, February 16, 2018 at the Crown Plaza Hotel - Lansing

Job Pursuit is the annual job fair sponsored and hosted by a consortium of private, independent Michigan Colleges and Universities dedicated to the advancement of employment opportunities in Michigan. Visit the website through the above link for complete information, including a list of employers scheduled to attend the 2015 event (list of companies TBA as event gets closer).

Recommended Resources for Internships and Jobs

  • Coolworks.com - job and internship site for the adventurous student and graduate
  • Idealist.org - internship opportunities worldwide focused on non-profit organizations
  • Internships.com - Internships.com claims to be the world's largest internship marketplace bringing students, employers and higher education institutions together in one centralized location. 
  • Interninimichigan.com - Register with the new Intern in Michigan and get instant internship matches based on your individual needs. It's free to post internships and it's free to apply for opportunities.
  • Pure Michigan Talent Connect - Michigan Talent Bank connects you to postings on company websites of internship and job opportunities in Michigan
  • MI Internships - MIINTERNSHIP.com is an internship service provided by regional economic development partners led by Southwest Michigan First, Southwest Michigan's private economic development organization serving a seven-county region.
  • Michigan.gov/intern - internships with the State of Michigan in various agencies and departments
  • Mlive Job listings in Michigan listed with Mlive
  • NACELinkNetwork - National Association of Colleges and Employers web site for national job postings. Consistently, over 2 million jobs and internships geard toward college students.
  • Pathways to Equity - Improving women's access to good middle-skill jobs can help close the wage gap and improve women's economic security. The Pathways to Equity Initiative shows job changes that can improve women's economic standing and meet employers' demands for skilled workers.
  • Science Jobs and Internships - Comprehensive list from the Albion College Library
  • USAJobs - Government website where nearly all federal government jobs are posted.
  • ZipRecruiter - Great resource that is being touted as the best job search engine.

 

LinkedIn

LinkedIn Job Search - The world's largest professional network to build relationships and connect with opportunity. Use LinkedIn Job Search to harness the power of your network to uncover insights such as whom you know at a company, providing you an edge in your job search.
LinkedIn Internship Search - Same powerful tool as LinkedIn Job Search, but focused on internships.
LinkedIn Salary Search Tool - Good method for you to understand your worth as you enter salary discussions with employers.

 

General Internship Advice

In today's competitive job market, it is extremely important for you to obtain experience related to your career ambitions.  Employers will be asking you about your internships, part-time jobs, and summer jobs to assess your ability to perform in a full-time position.  Companies are now using internships as one of the most common methods to select new employees.  Albion College can help you with this process through your faculty advisor, your institute, and the Career and Internship Center. 

  • Use ALL resources available to you including all personal and professional contacts, the Career and Internship Center, and your faculty advisor.
  • Apply early and apply often to any opportunity that might interest you.  Do not turn down a job or internship that you have not been offered!
  • Be certain you have a quality resume and associated application materials before applying— the Career and Internship Center is available to assist you!
  • Use the Registrar's Internship Form to receive credit for your internship

Additional Internship Sources

Research and/or Fellowship Opportunities

Additional Career Resources

GlassDoor

By your third year, you should have laid the groundwork for your future. You have chosen a major and are active in adding experiences to complement your studies. At this time all the experience and information you have gathered should be crystallizing into solid career goals and plans.

  • Meet with a Career Development staff member to formulate your job or graduate school search timeline and plans.
  • Focus and set career goals based on what you have learned about you, your interests, and possible professions.
  • Discuss your career plans with your faculty advisor.
  • Explore and make arrangements for off-campus study and internship options.
  • Consider applying for scholarships and fellowships found in the Career and Internship Center and in Career Resources, Graduate School Financing.
  • Join student chapters of professional organizations to gain career information and to start networking.
  • Research graduate/professional school possibilities, their application procedures and deadlines. Many resources are available through the Career Development Office, including Peterson’s Graduate and Professional School Guides.
  • Pick up a GRE, LSAT or MCAT packet in the Career Development Office.
  • Register and prepare for admission tests such as the GRE, LSAT and MCAT.
  • Participate in career fairs and career related events to explore your options and network with potential employers.
  • Get to know faculty members in your major.
  • Take on leadership roles on and off-campus.
  • Get professional experience through on-campus research, an internship, on-campus employment, volunteer work or a summer job.

Use all of your resources, including the Career and Internship Center. You are not alone in this process!

NEXT: Senior Year: Implementation & Transition

Today’s primary modes of communication are e-mail, text messages, and web pages. The job search process is no different. Most job searches are done on the Internet, and job seekers e-mail their resumes or complete online applications.

Given these facts: Are cover letters still necessary?

While the answer varies, the majority of human resource representatives and recruiters say yes. Done the right way, a cover letter can capture the second glance needed in a competitive job market.

There are two tips for crafting a catchy cover letter: follow the formula and personalize it.

Tip #1: Follow the formula

Cover letters contain four components with one essential question answered in each.

Paragraph One – Introduction

Who are you and why are you writing?

Paragraph Two – Highlight of Qualifications

How has your education, previous employment, or other experiences repared you for the position?

Paragraph Three – Connection to the Company

Why is this company or job a good fit for you?

Paragraph Four – Closing Statement

How interested are you and where can you be reached for an interview?

Tip #2: Personalize it

Paragraphs one and four follow standard formats. The opportunity for your application to connect with a recruiter is in paragraphs two and three.

Paragraph Two: Draw attention to yourself

When you read the job description and you declared, “I’m perfect for this job!” Tell the recruiter why. Is it because of a particular course you studied? Did you complete an internship that allowed you to perform similar duties and responsibilities? Were you able to develop a skill set through a part-time job or campus activity that is applicable to this position?

Make the connection between your past and this job. Don’t repeat your resume, but rather make reference to items on it that you especially want the recruiter to be aware of.

Paragraph Three: “Professional Flattery”

Your job search will reveal many positions for which you are qualified, but not all of them are of interest. What makes this position or company different? Pinpoint specifics about the job description that catch your eye. Research the organization. If the company product or workplace philosophy is appealing, tell the recruiter why.

Avoid empty compliments. Recruiters can spot meaningless sweet talk a mile away.

Pitfalls to Avoid

Applicants sometimes forget professionalism, and even common sense, when it comes to e-mailing and the job search. If your e-mail contains any of the following, hit the delete button.

  • A risqué e-mail address. Use a basic e-mail address comprised of your name, initials, or something similar. Save or for corresponding with friends.
  • Greeting the recruiter by their first name. If you know the recruiter’s name, don’t forget that Mr. or Ms. is still necessary. Just because Ms. Jane Doe lists her first name doesn’t mean you can call her Jane.
  • A salutation that doesn’t begin with “Dear.” This is a business letter. Beginning the correspondence with “Greetings,” “Hello,” or “Hi There!” is not acceptable.
  • Emoticons. 8-) :-( ;-) Emoticons are used to convey attitudes or emotions, both of which are irrelevant in a cover letter.
  • Acronyms. LOL, COB, FAQs. As with emoticons, acronyms have no place in job-search correspondence, unless they are standard acronyms, such as that used for a company or association. For example: NACE (National Association of Colleges and Employers) is appropriate. “The 411 about NACE is very positive” is not.
by Kelli Robinson
JobWeb.com - Career and Internship Center and job-search advice for the new college graduate

Advertising Age Talent Works - job postings across the country in advertising, media, marketing, and public relations

Advertising Educational Foundation - information on advertising careers including advise on preparing for a career and links to multiple career search engines

Magazine Publishers of America - comprehensive career site for the consumer magazine publishing community including internship and job searches

Marketing Research Resources - search for a wide range of jobs in the area of market research across the country

AdvertisingJobsNow.com -  search for jobs in the advertising fields as well as get advice on the ins and outs of this particular fields job market

Do you want to help an Albion student?

As Albion College alumni, you know the quality of the educational experience at Albion and its students. You also know that the people working in careers have an expertise that can go beyond what is available at the College. If you are interested in assisting current Albion students, we are interested in adding you to our network of mentors.

Process Overview

The Albion College mentoring program uses the strengths of the LinkedIn network, Albion alumni, and supporters. The Albion Mentoring LinkedIn Group is a subgroup of the Albion College official LinkedIn group. You will need to be granted permission to be a part of the Mentoring group and will be expected to adhere to strong ethical standards to participate.

Mentoring Topics

Topics that may be covered within a mentoring relationship may be as simple as questions about how to communicate a skill in a resume.  Students and mentors may form longer term mentoring relationships that cover choice of career, success in college, and success after college.

Getting Matched with a Mentee

The matching process will materialize in one of a few ways: the public arena of the Linkedin group or through a student reaching out to a specific mentor that is a member of the group.  Public postings allow the Career and Internship Center, Alumni, and Parent Leadership offices to monitor and facilitate matches.

pdfMentoring Program Handout for Mentors

If you have any additional questions, please contact the Career and Internship Center.

We hope you consider giving back to Albion College students. The role of mentoring is very important to the success of our graduates!

Higher Education and Ministry - comprehensive information on ministerial careers, education, financial aid, and networking

Work Ministry - a faith-based social network of job seekers and job opportunities

Jesuit Volunteer Corp - offers men and women an opportunity to work full time to  a mission of serving the poor directly, working for structural change in the United States, and accompanying people in developing countries.

 Mercy Corps - Their mission is to alleviate suffering, poverty, and oppression by helping people build secure, productive, and just communities. 

Lutheran Volunteer Corps - Lutheran Volunteer Corps (LVC) unites full-time stipended Volunteers with financial supporters, non-profit organizations and ministries to work for peace with justice across the nation. In addition to working for justice, LVC Volunteers live together in intentional household communities of 4-7 people to encourage simple, sustainable living.

A Great Lakes Colleges Association Recognized Program

Subjects: Visual Arts, Performing Arts, Media Arts, and Writing and Publishing.

Prerequisities: 2.7 GPA, junior-level standing, demonstrated maturity. Placement with a sponsoring artist to be arranged by a New York faculty advisor.

Length: Fall semester, spring semester, or 4 week Summer Visual Arts Intensive (4 credits = 1 unit).

Credit: 4.0 units (16 semester hours): 2.0 unit seminars, 2.0 units internship, credit/no credit only.

Faculty: Each student is assigned an academic advisor from their area of study. This faculty member teaches an area study and works closely with the student and their apprenticeship sponsor.

Housing: In the New York Arts Program's Chelsea Residence

Cost: Albion College tuition and room charges cover program tuition, fees and room. Students receive $25 per week for transportation and cultural events, paid out twice during the semester provided students' accounts are current.

Costs Not Covered by Albion: $150 for housing deposit, travel to New York City for the required interview and for the program, food, local transportation, miscellaneous personal expenses, incidentals, and entertainment.

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Bille K. Wickre, 517-629-0249,

Comments: The New York Arts program is made up of 4 components: Internships, Seminars, Tutorial & Independent Study and Journals. Students will be required to work in internships usually 30 hours a week forming the major part of the program; take a six-week seminar with their Faculty Advisors on various topics; pursue a clearly defined self-directed study project designed in conjunction with and supervised by his or her faculty advisor; and keep a journal of their experiences, observations and critical reflections. A personal interview in New York is required of all applicants to determine potential ability to work with any given sponsor. Students should allow 3 working days in New York for these interviews. Albion allows only 4 total units of internship toward graduation requirements; the Registrar can help you determine if you will exceed this amount.

Contact:
Susan Childrey
Program Coordinator
305 West 29th Street
New York, NY 10001
Telephone: 212-563-0255
Fax: 212-563-0256
E-mail: susan@newyorkartsprogram.org
Web: http://www.nyartsprogram.org/

Center for Strategic & International Studies - internships for those interested in gaining practical experience in public policynonprofit sector

Federation of State Public Interest Research Groups (PIRG) - positions available across the country for people interested in social change to work in the non-profit sector

Idealist Guides to Nonprofit Careers - information and listings for career opportunities in the

JustMeans - opportunities in social and environmental innovation across the country

Michigan Nonprofit Association - nonprofit job opportunities in Michigan

Nonprofic Career Network - opportunities in the nonprofit sector and a directory or nonprofit organizations helping the world

SocialService.com - job opportunities in all areas of the social service industry

 

 

All Areas of Diversity

  • Diversity Employers - Jobs with employers committed to diversity
  • Diversity Jobs - search for jobs at diversity-friendly companies in your area
  • Diversity Search - helping to promote diversity in the workplace
  • Equal Opportunity Publications - a portfolio of seven national career magazines, a diversity website, online job board, and Career Expos for women, members of minority groups, and people with disabilities

 

Physical Disabilities

For People of Color

 

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, & Transgender Friendly Employment

  • GLB Careers - jobs for the gay community
  • Out & Equal - LGBT CareerLink - job search and employment networking site
  • Diversity World - information on job seeking if you have a disability and career opportunities
  • ProGay Jobs - find the perfect position with companies committed to diversity in the workplace
  • Simply Hired - jobs at GLBT-friendly companies
  • Out for Work - assistance to students in the cultivation and enhancement of skills to explore career options, master search techniques and strategies and research employment opportunities

Women in the workforce

    Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey!

    Your reponses are key to information that will assist in improving services at the college as well as provide information in respond to questions from faculty, graduate schools, employers, alumni, and prospective students. Grouped data is also used in response to requests from organizations like Barron’s, Peterson’s and U.S. News and World Report.

    Information provided will remain strictly confidential and absolutely no identifying information will be used.


    How to complete the survey

    • You will be mailed a copy of the survey to complete and return
    • If you prefer, you can complete the survey on-line


    Thank you very much for your time and participation!

    Following are a list of questions commonly asked by potential employers. Review this list and pre-plan possible responses. This will help you feel at ease during the interview.

    General Questions

    • Tell me about yourself.
    • What school activities have you participated in? Why?
    • If you have not been active on campus, why not?
    • Have you held any leadership roles? If so, what were they and what did you learn from these experiences?
    • Why/how did you choose Albion College?
    • What is your major? Why/how did you choose that major? If you were to start over, would you choose it again? Why/why not?
    • What were you favorite/least favorite classes? Why?
    • Do you feel you have done the best scholastic work you are capable of? Why/why not?
    • What is the single most important statement you would make about your experiences at Albion College?
    • What are your greatest strengths/weaknesses? What are you doing to improve any weaknesses?
    • What personal characteristics do you think are necessary for success in this field?
    • How do you work under pressure? Can you give me an example?
    • Give me an example of when you worked as a team leader/player.
    • What is the toughest group you've had to get cooperation from?
    • Tell me about your past work experiences. What did you like most and least about these jobs?
    • Have you ever been a member of a group where members did not get along or work well together? What did you learn from this experience?
    • What interests you about this position/organization?
    • Describe a situation that required you to do many things at once. How did you handle this?
    • What are two or three things that are most important for you to have in a job/position?
    • Describe a major problem you've encountered. How did you handle this?
    • Describe a project or idea you initiated.
    • Describe an unpopular decision you made. What was the result?
    • What do you consider to be your most significant accomplishment? Why?
    • Describe the relationship you think should exist between a supervisor and supervisee.
    • What type of work environment do you prefer?
    • What do you know about this organization?
    • Tell me about something creative you've done in a past job.
    • If you were hiring someone for this position, what qualities would you look for in a candidate?
    • Why should we hire you?

    Questions commonly asked of teacher candidates

    • What is your philosophy of education?
    • What issues in education are of greatest concern to you? Why?
    • Describe the role of the teacher in the learning process.
    • What is the role of the teacher in the community?
    • How would you individualize instruction in your classroom?
    • Why do you want to teach?
    • What special abilities do you have that would benefit your students?
    • What prompted you to go into the field of education?
    • Describe your grading style. Do you grade on ability or effort? Why?
    • Tell me about your student teaching experience.
    • How do you feel about observations by supervisors or principals?
    • Are you interested in working with students in extracurricular activities? Why/why not? Which activities?
    • What subject areas most interest you?
    • How do you think children learn?
    • What magazines, periodicals, books have you read recently related to education?
    • What is your philosophy of classroom management? Give me an example of how you handled a discipline problem during your student teaching.
    • What are your thoughts on teaching a split grade?
    • Give me an example of a time where you contributed to a project.
    • What did you find most beneficial in your student teaching experience?

    The interview is your chance to meet potential employers or graduate school colleagues and to expand upon the information highlighted in your résumé and application materials. It is also the chance to learn first hand and in detail about positions and organizations in your field of interest.

    Think of the interview as the opportunity to exchange information, not a one-way monologue in which your role is to only answer questions asked.

    Although interviewing time lines and processes vary according to your field or the organization, there are many standard aspects of interviewing. These include:

    • Interacting with employers before and after the interview
    • Preparing for the interview
    • Tips on the interview itself

    The Career and Internship Center is available to assist you as you prepare for an interview. Preparation and practice are key in acing your interview!

    The Career and Internship Center staff is available to assist your organization in recruiting Albion College students. Please contact us and we are happy to assist you.

    In addition to the opportunities listed below, employers are invited to send recruitment information or company brochures to our office. This information is kept on file for students who are interested in exploring possible employment options.

    There are many ways that the Career and Internship Center can assist you with your recruiting needs. While these are listed below, please do not hesitate to contact the Career and Internship Center to see how the office can format your recruiting experience around your specific needs.

    Post job and internship opportunities in Handshake Join Handshake

    Join Handshake now

    If you have an account, simply sign in using your username and password.

    • To create and account, use the Register or Register And Postr Job buttons to the right. You will receive an email with a link to the Albion College site once access is completed
    • You can always contact the Career and Internship Center at 517/629-0332 and we can create an account for you

    Post your job descriptions directly through this system.

    If you prefer to have the Career and Internship Center staff post your position, simply send the information via email to or via fax to 517/629-0578.

    Conduct on-campus interviews

    On-campus interviews at Albion College are particularly important. It provides acces to our students and exposes your company to Albion College. This familiarity will help you create knowledge and understanding of who you are and the employment opportunities that you have available. Your interviews aso help expose the students to the important services offered by the Career and Internship Center. You are provided space to meet individually with students in a private setting. Our staff is available to assist you in posting notices, registering applicants, and providing support as you are on campus.

    To arrange on-campus interviews, contact our office by phone at 517/629-0332, via email at . You may also login to the Handshake to submit details and request a schedule.

    Participate in information sessions

    You may choose to present a program to interested students (typically 1 hour in length) on the Albion College campus. This format allows employers and students to learn more about one another in a relaxed setting. The Career and Internship Center can assist you by arranging the accommodations, providing audio-visual equipment, publicizing the program, and following up with any recruitment needs that may arise.

    To arrange to conduct an information session, contact our office by phone at 517/629-0332 or via email at .

    The first step to attending graduate school is to find the one best suited to you!

    You ultimately will need to do the research necessary to determining which schools fit your needs. The Career and Internship Center is available to assist you through the process.

    To get started, here is a list of Internet resources providing searchable lists of graduate schools based on many criteria.

    This page contains links to web sites that are not under the control of Albion College or the Career and Internship Center. We are not responsible for the contents of any linked site. The Career and Internship Center provides these links merely as a courtesy. The data contained in this web site is for informational purposes only and is not represented to be error free.

    Anywork Anywhere - Information on Visa's, permits, and restrictions for working abroad

    EscapeArtist.com - Supporting materials and job searches to maximize your chance of obtaining a position overseas

    Hostels.com - Hostels and other cheap places to stay worldwide

    One Small Planet - General information on work study, volunteer, and travel options abroad

    U.S. Department of State - Authoritative information on everything you need to travel or work abroad

    Bureau of Labor Statistics - The U.S. Department of Labor site providing information on trends in careers, employment, compensation, and much more

    CareerOneStop - Industry profiles, employment opportunities, and salary possibilities

    GlassDoor - An inside look at jobs and companies

    Linked-In.com - a network of colleagues and industry experts for inside connections and information for your questions

    WetFeet.com - Industry profiles and general information on a large range of careers

    Often the resume is the first piece of information that an employer sees about you.  It is of utmost importance to make your resume professional and communicate your intended message. We can help you demystify the process!

    Please review our comprehensive pdfResume Handout for resume information. Seeking personalized help with your résumé? Schedule an appointment with the Career and Internship Center.

    Fashion Career Center - career advice, schools, and opportunities in the world of fashion

    National Retail Federation - Retail Careers Center provides information on job openings as well as information on improving your skills in all aspects of retailing


    March 20, 2007

    Ms. Nancy Edoff
    Human Resources
    1461 E. Twelve Mile Rd.
    Madison Heights, MI 48071

    Dear Ms. Nancy Edoff:

    I am writing to apply for the Development Assistant position at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital advertised on the Albion College eRecruiting website. I am highly interested in working in the nonprofit sector, and believe my event planning, fundraising, and communication skills match what you are looking for in a candidate.

    In addition to my Bachelor of Arts degree in Speech Communication, I have been an events planning intern at the XYZ Women’s Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan. My experience at XYZ taught me how to work with vendors, design promotional materials, and organize all aspects of events. I played a major role in organizing the yearly Walk for Women event, from contributing creative ideas to calling contacts and organizing events. This experience makes me well suited to execute development events for St. Jude.

    My fundraising experiences also make me well qualified for this position. In addition to learning about the field of development while volunteering at three local nonprofit organizations, I have been the philanthropy chair for my sorority. This year my sorority raised money for a local women’s shelter. My creativity and knowledge helped me to create a fundraising campaign that has brought the most money to the shelter in years. Since fundraising is a significant part of the Development Assistant job, I would be well equipped to continue St. Jude’s fundraising success.

    Finally, my communication skills will help me make a contribution to the St. Jude team. As a student assistant in the Albion College Communications Office, I wrote press releases everyday. These skills will allow me to clearly convey to potential donors the importance of supporting St. Jude.

    I have enjoyed the nonprofit work I have done and find that it energizes me. I would like to bring my event planning, fundraising, and communication skills to the St. Jude Children’s Research team as the Development Assistant. Enclosed is my resume for your review and I am available at your convenience for an interview.

    Thank you for your time in reviewing my materials. I look forward to speaking with you.

    Sincerely,

    Mary A. Albion

     


     

    Brit Briton
    900 Kellogg Center
    Albion College
    Albion, MI 49224
    (517) 629-0000
    email

    April 8, 2011

    Ms. Katherine Sorrel
    Relations Specialist
    ABC Corporation
    1 Industry Drive
    Hartford, CT 06152

    Dear Ms. Sorrel:

    Please consider my enclosed resume for the XYZ Leadership Development Program. Currently, I am a senior majoring in English at Albion College with a minor in Economics. The qualities I have to offer XYZ in this program include:

    Leadership skills: While a student at Albion, I co-founded a student organization aimed at increasing community service involvement campus-wide. Over the past three years, we have been able to generate a 32% increase in student participation and have made valuable contributions to the Albion community. I also served as a Resident Assistant to more than 100 first-year students while achieving a 3.5 GPA in my classes.

    Interpersonal skills: While working as an intern at XYZ Company, I was selected for the marketing strategy team that partnered to increase revenue by 41% and customer base by 20%. During the summer months, I volunteered for a local non-profit organization where I worked with clients from different cultures. Based on my contributions and commitment to the organization, I earned recognition as “Volunteer of the Month.”

    Analytical and quantitative skills: In a team-based business simulation, I continuously analyzed the market and our competition for a financial services firm throughout the semester. The professor acknowledged our final project as being “an outstanding example for future classes.” Last year, as an intern, I participated in a cross-functional team to assess a proposed business venture expanding customer product offerings.

    XYZ is a long-time leader in providing full-service solutions. Through this approach, the company has continued to expand its client base and market position for more than 125 years. Specifically, your mission to help people lead healthier, more secure lives matches my own personal values and interests, as demonstrated through my community service efforts.

    I am committed to adding value and contributing to XYZ’s global expansion. I am available at your convenience for an interview. Thank you in advance for your consideration. I look forward to speaking with you.

    Sincerely,

    Brit Briton

    Asking questions of your interviewer is the simplest way of showing knowledge about the position and an interest in the company. Don't interrupt with questions but be prepared when given the opportunity.

    Sample questions you might ask a potential employer

    • What is a typical day like?
    • What personal qualities/characteristics are most important for success in this position/organization?
    • What working relationships will I have with others in the organization?
    • How often will my performance be evaluated? How will I be evaluated?
    • What are the prospects for future growth and expansion of this company?
    • What are the major changes that this organization wishes to bring about?
    • What training opportunities are available to better prepare employees for their position or for advancement?
    • What is the company's management philosophy?
    • Has this organization hired Albion graduates in the past? If so, what is their success record?
    • What will be expected of me as a new employee?
    • What has been your career path with this company?

    If interviewing for a teaching position

    • What is the average class size?
    • What auxiliary services are offered to the student? To the teacher?
    • Describe the economic/cultural mix of students in your district.
    • Does the community support the school district? How?
    • What type of support does the administration provide for teachers?

    American Cancer Society - bring your talent and skills to communities across the country and join in the fight against cancer

    Health Careers in Michigan - Michigan.gov resource for information on the hottest health careers in Michigan

    MedZilla - internship and job opportunities in biotechnology, pharmaceutical, healthcare, and science fields

    Michigan Health Care Jobs - job board for health care professionals

    At long last - you have achieved your last year at Albion College. It is more critical than ever that you use your resources well, stay organized, and keep your eye on the ball.

    • Meet with a Career and Internship Center staff member to design a job search strategy or finalize your graduate/professional school search timeline and plans.
    • Attend Career and Internship Center workshops targeted for seniors: Developing a Job Searching Plan, Resume Writing, Successful Interviewing, Getting an Apartment, Day One at Work as well as a Senior Open House and more.
    • Ask faculty and employers to provide references for you.
    • Revise and update your resume and draft a cover letter.  For graduate school, complete your personal statement.
    • Mail your applications to graduate schools.
    • Prepare for graduate school or job interviews with a mock interview in the Career and Internship Center.
    • Complete an internship or career-related work experience if you haven’t already.
    • Formulate an alternate “Plan B” in case you need to make last minute career adjustments.
    • Assist your student organization transition from your leadership to the upcoming leaders in the group.
    • Begin to research companies/organizations and the career opportunities they offer.
    • Participate in career fairs and build your network of contacts in your field of interest.

    Most importantly - use all the expertise and resources Albion College has to offer as you transition to career or graduate school following graduation!

    Where small commitments make big differences.

    Service work provides opportunities to gain experience in an area you are considering as a career. You may choose to help out a local candidate for political office, assist the elderly in preparing their taxes, or work with children in the schools. Whatever your career interests are, you can find great experience in a service opportunity.

    Here is a very limited list of organizations providing service opportunities—the possibilities are limitless!

    • 4-H Clubs - Volunnteer as an adult in your local community club.
    • American Cancer Society - Work as a volunteer in any community to help further the fight against cancer.
    • American Red Cross - A national organization with local chapters.
    • Americorps - Your chance to put your ideas into action while learning new skills, making new connections, and earning money to pay for college.
    • Camp Staff - A resource for summer camp jobs across North America.
    • Connect-123 - Volunteer and internship programs in five international cities: Buenos Aires, Barcelona, Cape Town, Shanghai, and Dublin.
    • Cross-Cultural Solutions - A resource for international volunteer opportunities.
    • Global Volunteer Network - A non profit organiziation which places volunteers in community projects worldwide.
    • Global Volunteers - Live and work with local people on life-affirming service programs.
    • GoAbroad.com - Directory of over 27,000 opportunites abroad updated daily.
    • Habitat for Humanity - Building projects across the nation and world change lives and communities.
    • Idealist.org - Thousands of volunteer opportunities in the nonprofit sector.
    • Innisfree - Provide live-in caregiving to residents with intellictually disabilities.
    • Make-A-Wish Foundation - Fulfilling the wishes of children with life-threatening illnesses - opportunities available at chapters across the country.
    • Michigan Community Service Commission - Provides vision and resources to strengthen communities through volunteerism.
    • Michigan Nonprofit Association - Committed to promoting and strengthening a life-long ethic of service and civic engagment through the support of community-building initiatives.
    • Peace Corps - Work across the globe to train people for better lives.
    • Rotary International - Service club providing volunteer opportunities locally, regionally, and internationally.
    • Student Conservation Association - Providing hands-on conservation service opportunities.
    • Teach for America - Teaching children in underserved areas.
    • UN Volunteers Program - The United Nations Volunteer Program (UNV) is the UN organization that contributes to peace and development through volunteerism worldwide.
    • United Way - Volunteer in one of countless ways across America through the United Way.
    • Volunteer Centers of Michigan - Statewide network of over 30 volunteer centers serving 59 Michigan counties.
    • Volunteer Match - Find opportunities around the country to volunteer.
    • World Volunteer Web - A resource of networking and dissemination of information, to develop an inclusive and global volunteer network.

    This page contains links to web sites that are not under the control of Albion College or the Career and Internship Center. We are not responsible for the contents of any linked site. The Career and Internship Center provides these links merely as a courtesy. The data contained in this web site is for informational purposes only and is not represented to be error free.

    In your second year, it is even more important that you are looking toward the future. You will declare your major and need to be actively searching for experiential learning opportunities.

    • Meet with a Career Development staff member to discuss your career plans and re-evaluate your personalized 4-year career plan.
    • Continue to research career fields that interest you.
    • Register with professional networks to begin connecting with experts in areas of interest. TrylinkedinLogo
    • Attend a Career Development workshop to learn about the process of choosing a major or career path and attend programs featuring guest speakers from career fields that interest you.
    • Conduct informational interviews with professionals to learn about a particular career field.
    • Complete your core academic requirements.
    • Meet with your faculty advisor to choose a major.
    • Take an active role in a student organization to develop your communication, teamwork and problem-solving skills.
    • Explore experiential learning options.
    • Develop the materials needed to apply for experiential learning opportunities such as internships.
    • Secure an internship, on-campus job or summer employment related to your career goals.

    As you become more active in seeking experiences to compliment your academic learning, continue to utilize the resources and expertise of the staff in the Career Development Office!

    NEXT: Junior Year: Career Goal Setting, Gaining Experience & Graduate School Planning

    The Market: Careers in College Athletics - an NCAA site providing a wide range of opportunities in every aspect of college athletics

    TeamWork Online - an online job board providing information on opening with teams in all sporting fields

    CoolWorks.com - positions in recreational areas for year-round or seasonal work

    YMCA of the Rockies - seasonal or year-round volunteer and employment opportunities in the Rockies and Internationally

    Summer employment is unique - particularly if you are seeking work in a summer camp! The search engines on this site focus on positions for the summer.

    Remember - general job search engines also list positions for summer work!

    experience_logo     The eRecruiting network at Albion College: Create a profile and access both jobs and internship opportunities in your areas of interest!
    • CampDepot.com - summer and after-school opportunities and tips on what program directors seek in an employee
    • CampJobs.com - a one-stop site for all forms of summer camp employment around the world
    • CampStaff.com - create one profile and contact hundreds of potential employers across North America
    • CoolWorks.com - seasonal or permanent employment available in a wide range of areas, including National Parks
    • Yellowstone National Parks Lodges - jobs for people at all skill levels from entry-level to management - internship opportunities also available!
    • YMCA of the Rockies - seasonal or year-round volunteer and employment opportunities in the Rockies and Internationally
    This page contains links to web sites that are not under the control of Albion College or the Career and Internship Center. We are not responsible for the contents of any linked site. The Career and Internship Center provides these links merely as a courtesy. The data contained in this web site is for informational purposes only and is not represented to be error free.

    Today, Behavioral-Based Interviewing (BBI) is the most commonly used campus interviewing technique. Corporate recruiters spend anywhere from half a day to two days learning to ask questions based on the BBI method. For you, acing the BBI is a matter of planning and understanding what recruiters are looking for.

    Why BBI?

    It’s simple. The best predictor of future behavior is recent past behavior. For example, you have a friend who is always late to class. What’s the likelihood that she’ll be late to class tomorrow?

    That’s the principle of BBI. Interviewers want to get a picture of how you have behaved (recently) in a situation because it will help them determine how you’ll most likely behave in that same situation on the job.

    What kinds of questions will be asked?

    Questions will always be asked in the past tense. For example:

    • Tell me about a time that you…
    • Think back on a situation where you…
    • Play a little movie in your mind and remember a time when you…

    How should I respond?

    Let’s say that I asked you to tell me about a time when you were a part of a difficult team and what you did to get the team back on track. Corporate recruiters want your answers to include the following:

    • Situation: Explain the situation. Was it a class team? What was the project? What was difficult about the team?
    • Action: What did YOU do to pull the team together? What specific action did you take? Keep in mind that recruiters want to know what “you” did. Not, what “we” did or “they” did. Talk about your role in the situation.
    • Outcome: Discuss the outcome of the project or team. Did the team succeed? How did you know the team was successful?
    • Learning: Sometimes you’ll be asked to think back on an example when you weren’t successful (or when you failed at something). If the recruiter doesn’t ask you what you learned and how you modified your behavior, be sure that you add this information to your answer. Again, be specific about exactly what you learned and how you’ve incorporated this learning into your daily routine.

    Whenever possible, use examples from your internship, class work, professional association, or other work/degree-related experiences. Before going to an interview, stop and think of some of your most important milestones: projects, grades, presentations, work experiences that make you most proud. Build your examples around these when answering questions. Always use your best examples and concisely tell the story to the recruiter.

    Caution: Corporate recruiters spend hours being trained to ask legal questions. Keep your answers focused on recent job-related experiences, professional association experiences or classroom examples. Do your very best NOT to use personal or family examples, examples from religious organizations or nondegree related association examples. And, when deciding whether to use an example from something you did when you were in high school vs. college—use the most recent example.

    How do I prepare?

    To prepare, look at the job description (if one is available—if not, use the ad for the job as a basis) and think of the best example to demonstrate that you have each attribute. In addition, there are some standard attributes that many companies look for, such as the following:

    • Strong communicator
    • Adaptable/flexible
    • Able to work in teams
    • Self-directed/motivated
    • Demonstrates honesty and integrity
    • Goal-oriented
    • Strong follow-through

    A corporate recruiter’s advice

    Dana Pulliam, senior manager of university relations for Applied Biosystems, offers the following tips:

    • Make sure your response is clear and concise. Watch the interviewer’s body language. If they seem uninterested, wrap up your answer.
    • The worst thing you can do is make up an answer. If you can’t think of an answer, say so. Don’t try to bluff your way through because the interviewer will know it.
    • Before admitting to not having a response, stop and think about class projects, group projects, or even an activity that’s not school-related.
    • Use your career services center to look for sample questions and participate in mock interview classes.
    • If you have to use a personal example to answer a question, that’s okay. Just be sure that you don’t answer every question with a personal example.
    • The best students that I have interviewed have been those who are able to speak to everything on their resume.
    By Sue Keever
    JobWeb.com - Career and Internship Center and job-search advice for the new college graduate

    Success in anything comes with practice. To develop a confident interview style, you are advised to practice in a "risk-free" atmosphere. You can practice in front of a mirror or in front of a friend, but serious practice will reap benefits before an interview.

    The Career and Internship Center offers several resources to help you gain interviewing experience and to help you develop strategies for relating your past experiences to employers. The Career Resource Library has several books and resources on interviewing. Access to potential questions, in conjunction with your background research, will allow you to have meaningful practice sessions.

    Consider scheduling an appointment in the Career and Internship Center for a mock interview. Students who have done this tell us it is very beneficial to their comfort level and confidence. Don't forget the faculty at Albion. Mock interviews with experts in the field is also extremely beneficial.

    As you consider how to respond to potential interview questions, your objective should be to have responses which are thoughtful, persuasive, and illustrated by example, as well as to successfully articulate how you will contribute to the organization and what you seek from the job.

    Don't feel you have to do this on your own… contact us!

    NEXT: How to Ace an Interview - How can I set myself apart from other interviewing?

    A Great Lakes Colleges Association Recognized Program

    Subjects: The Philadelphia Center offers more than 800 internships and students from all majors are welcome. Students will earn a full semester's credit as they intern four days a week in an organization of their choice; live with fellow students throughout the city; learn through our city-based seminars; and experience life in one of the nation's most dynamic cities. TPC's full-time faculty and staff offer a unique and highly individualized program.

    For more than 40 years, The Philadelphia Center has offered more than 6,000 college students a semester of experiential education, a unique hands-on opportunity geared toward professional, academic, and personal growth in an active urban environment. Students will work closely with TPC staff to choose career-building internships and independent living arrangements. TPC's seminars will provide insight into professional and urban life. At The Philadelphia Center, experiential education means that you influence and direct your learning.

    Prerequisities: 2.7 GPA, junior-level standing, demonstrated maturity.

    Length: Fall and Spring Semesters (or Learning Work -- an eight-week summer program)

    Credit: 4.0 units: 2.0 units Urban Field Placement (Internship), 1.0 unit City Seminar, 1.0 unit Elective Seminar.

    Housing: Homes or apartments (TPC assists students in locating reasonably priced, conveniently located housing). Students are housed in a hotel during initial orientation.

    Faculty Advisor: Dr. Vicki Baker, Robinson 111; e-mail:

    Cost: Albion College tuition and fees covers program tuition and fees.

    Costs Not Covered by Albion: Housing, board and entertainment. You will not be paying room and board and those funds are applied to your living expenses in Philadelphia. Other expenses include one-time expenses for hotel/temporary housing, books, and travel to and from Philadelphia. Students are often required to make a one- to two-month security deposit for their housing.

    Comments: The program is open to all majors and provides opportunities for professional and intellectual development while living in the city and learning in an experience-based and academic context. The internships involve working full-time four days a week (a minimum of 32 hours) at the internship sites. Students should note that no more than 4.0 units of internship can count toward graduation requirements.

    Contact:
    Diana Waters,
    121 South Broad Street, 7th Floor
    Philadelphia, PA 19107
    Phone: 215.735.7300
    URL: www.tpc.edu

     

    Subjects: One seminar, variable topics. Internship. The Washington Center (TWC) assists students from all academic backgrounds in securing full-time internships in Washington, D.C. Through partnerships with over a thousand organizations in the nonprofit, for-profit, governmental and international arenas, TWC advisors are able to find students opportunities that not only match their professional interests, but also allow them to gain hands-on experience in their respective fields. In addition to the full time internships, students also take one academic course and attend a series of leadership, civic engagement, and professional development programming events. There are up to 30 courses offered each semester and summer across all academic disciplines. Through TWC's programming events, students engage with leaders in a range of fields in both the public and private sectors.

    Prerequisities: Junior-level standing is required by Albion College for admission into the program. Other factors that will be considered for admission are maturity level, quality of application materials (statement of professional interest, issues essay, resume, and letters of recommendation), and GPA. The basic GPA requirement is a 2.75, though keep in mind that a higher GPA may be required for the most competitive of placements. Due to background check requirements for some placements, early application submission may also be required. For dates and deadlines, we encourage you to review information on TWC’s website. Lastly, all students attending TWC from Albion must be approved by the campus liaison, Patrick McLean, prior to being granted admission by TWC.

    Length: Fall or Spring Semester or Summer Term

    Credit: The 4.0 units: 2.0 unit Internship, 1.0 unit seminar, and 1.0 unit for LEAD Colloquium. Summer credit is 2.0 units. Washington Center program is a comprehensive working, learning, and living experience, through which students not only complete a full-time internship, but also take an engaging academic course of their choosing, and attend weekly programming that furthers their professional development and exploration into their chosen career paths. For completion of this program, students receive academic credit directly from Albion College. Upon completion of a 15-week fall or spring semester program, students receive 4 units of credits, two as internship credit and one as seminar credit, and 1.0 unit for LEAD Colloquium. For the summer term program, which is 10 weeks in length, students receive 2 units of credit, one as internship credit and one as seminar, or students may apply both credits towards the internship.

    Housing: Most students are housed in The Washington Center's privately owned and operated Residential & Academic Facility (RAF), located in the NoMa neighborhood. The RAF is centrally located and convenient to all forms of public transit, such as the Metro, DC's underground subway system. The Washington Center also partners with other professional-style apartment facilities in the NoMa neighborhood to provide additional housing when necessary. Visit http://www.twc.edu/program-fees for more information on housing.

    Cost: Albion College tuition and room charges cover program tuition and room fees.

    Costs Not Covered by Albion: The program fees associated with The Washington Center program are covered by students’ tuition charges paid to Albion for the semester or term of attendance. Housing fees are paid directly to Albion College. Students are responsible for travel to and from Washington, D.C., as well as local transportation and living expenses while in the program. Depending on lifestyle, it is estimated that students spend between $125 and $200 per week.

    (Note: The U.S. Attorney's office, U.S. Department of State, and U.S. Department of Justice are agencies that require background checks, so students need to apply six (6) months in advance for these programs.)

    Faculty Advisor: Patrick McLean, Robinson Hall,

    Comments: The Washington Center offers some scholarships. See the brochure and the faculty advisor. Students should keep in mind that Washington is a very expensive city; internships require local transportation and they should budget accordingly. The Washington Center awards scholarships to between 75% and 80% of the students attending their programs during any given term or semester. To give yourself the greatest chance of receiving one of their awards, we encourage you to plan ahead and apply by the priority deadline. Amounts tend to range between $500 and $3,000. Read the descriptions of the available scholarships on TWC’s website www.twc.edu/internships/washington-dc-programs/program-costs-scholarships/us-students

    Contact:
    If you have any questions about The Washington Center and would like additional details on the program, please contact them directly:

    E-mail:
    Main Phone: (202) 238-7900
    Toll Free: (800) 486-8921
    Website: www.twc.edu

    The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars
    1333 16th St. NW
    Washington, D.C. 20036

    Begin planning for graduate school at least a year prior to when you would like to enter. Deadlines vary depending on the program, though, and it is important that you begin identifying potential schools/programs early and are clear on individual deadlines!

    Junior Year

    If you are considering graduate school, you need to begin your search for possible programs the fall of your junior year.

    • Meet with staff in the Career and Internship Center for assistance as you begin the search
    • Attend Graduate/Professional school fairs both on- and off-campus
    • Request information from programs that spark your interest
    • Consider making a visit to those schools/programs of most interest to you
    • Begin to explore financial aid resources - the Career and Internship Center can assist!

    By the spring and summer of your junior year, you should have a fairly good idea of places you intend to apply and know the deadlines you face in the fall.

    • Develop a personal statement using faculty and the Career and Internship Center as resources to create the best possible document for your field.
    • Register and prepare for required standardized tests.
    • Develop an application timeline for all schools to which you are applying - the process takes too much effort to be eliminated because you've missed a deadline!

    Senior Year

    Fall of your senior year is the time to be sure everything is in order and submitted on time!

    • Ensure you know how to apply for each school and have all the materials needed
    • Finalize essays and personal statements for each application
    • Request letters of recommendation from faculty - provide reference writers with your resume, personal statement, proper forms, adequate time to write the letters, and directions for handling the letters
    • Consider doing a mock interview with faculty or videotaped in the Career and Internship Center prior to professional school admissions interviews
    • Take your required standardized tests
    • Complete the applications - cutting and pasting information from word documents helps in ensuring there are no typing errors. Be sure to proofread the application before sending.
    • Order transcripts from the Registrar's Office - include fall semester grades if available prior to the deadline

    By spring of your senior year, many application deadlines have passed. Hopefully you are not waiting until the final deadline to submit your application! This is the time to await word on acceptance and finalize financing.

    • If you haven't yet completed your application submissions, you need to do that now
    • Complete financial aid forms - you may need to include a copy of your income tax return so consider getting that done early
    • Contact schools to be sure your application was submitted if you haven't received notice and verify the timeline for acceptance
    • Write thank you notes to the many people who have assisted you in the application process

    There are many resources on the Internet to assist you in writing a personal statement for graduate school.  No one resource is helpful to everyone and you are encouraged to read several as you start the writing process.

    Following are some resources published on the web.

    While the above articles can provide insight into writing personal statements, there is no substitute for speaking with people at Albion College. The faculty in your area of study has been through this process and can assist you with questions.  In addition, the Career and Internship Center is available to you for individual assistance as you start the process.

    General Tips as you Start

    Finding employment is, in large part, a function of effective communication. The success of your job search will hinge on your ability to present yourself professionally and demonstrate your value as a prospective employee. You must convince employers that you have something to offer if you are to receive further consideration. Employers are seeking to hire persons whose interests and abilities most closely match requirements of the job. A good fit between an individual's personality, values and philosophy and the organization's culture is also highly desirable.

    Producing a Professional Letter

    Just as with your resume, your letters should be error free and visually appealing. Although you may be able to send the same resume to a variety of different organizations, each letter you send should be carefully tailored to the situation and the employer being addressed. Never send a form letter.

    Employers will view your letter as an indication of your written communication skills, so keep it formal, businesslike, and concise. One page should be sufficient and it should be in print that is sharp and easy to read. Do not use unusual fonts.

    Whenever possible, address your letter to a specific person. This may require you to call the organization and ask to whom you should address your cover letter. Last, but not least, proofread carefully. Typos, spelling, grammatical or punctuation errors will prevent you from receiving serious consideration.

    Final Tips

    • Write to a specific person.
    • Present your message clearly, concisely, and honestly with consideration for your reader. Desirable length is usually one page.
    • Give specific and pertinent information relative to the position you seek. Generalities are not only confusing, but they imply you are trying to conceal a weakness. Include enough facts to be convincing.
    • Be yourself and be positive. Personnel executives easily recognize letters copied from textbooks, written by employment agencies, or sent out in mass.
    • Make the appearance attractive. Use a standard business letter format and 8 1/2 x 11" bond paper. White, ivory, and light gray colors are desirable. Type the letter with proper margins, indentation and spacing.
    • Proofread your letter. Is it interesting and persuasive? Does it include important aspects of your college experience, a bit of your personality, and all pertinent qualifications and skills? Are the punctuation, grammar, and spelling correct?
    • Drop off a draft, or make an appointment with a Career and Intership Center staff member for an objective critique of your letter.

    Cover letters can be a powerful way to add a compelling narrative about your skills to your job application, but like all things career-related, they need to be done effectively.

    A cover letter should never be an afterthought. The goal is for your cover letter to enhance your chances of getting an interview, but when done incorrectly, they have the exact opposite effect!

    Top 5 tips for creating a winning cover letter

    In the course of your job search, you will write two basic types of letters to seek out employment opportunities: letters of application and letters of inquiry.

    Letters of Application:

    This type of letter is written in response to a specific, advertised job opening. Your purpose is to spur employers to read your resume and set up a job interview. In order to be successful, you must demonstrate that your qualifications match the requirements of the position. If possible, get a copy of the position description and study it carefully. Your letter should be organized as follows:

    • Identify the position for which you are applying and state how you learned about it.
    • Describe your qualifications as they relate to the position requirements, providing evidence of your related experiences and accomplishments.
    • Convince the employer that you have the personal qualifications and motivation to perform well in the position.
    • Indicate your availability for an interview.

    Letters of Inquiry:

    This letter is written to seek out possible openings and generate, if not a job interview, at least an initial informal interview. Since many positions are not widely advertised, a letter of inquiry is used to familiarize the employer with your qualifications so they will remember you when a position opens. Its structure is similar to the letter of application; but instead of addressing specific position requirements, it focuses on your qualifications and interests in broader, more general terms. Like the letter of application, it will be most effective if it reflects a knowledge of the organization and communicates what you can do to contribute to organizational needs and goals. This type of letter should be organized as follows:

    • Ask for consideration for any existing or anticipated openings suited to your qualifications.
    • State why you are attracted to the organization and indicate the area of the organization that interests you or the type of position you are seeking.
    • Highlight your qualifications as they relate to your stated interest.

    Ask for the opportunity to meet with someone to further discuss your interests and qualifications.

    The interview provides a potential employer insight into who you are and how well you will fit into the company.  It also provides you with the opportunity to assess the work environment and people you will potentially call colleagues. This is true whether an interview for a job or for graduate school.

    Always prepare for an interview. Know as much as possible about the mission and work of the company or program. You also need to know the role you would assume and prepare for questions about your skills and abilities as fit the role.

    There are two basic types of interviews - in-person and over the phone.  Each requires preparation.

    In-person interviews

    • One-on-one interviews - You will meet with one person at a time. If you have several individual interviews, know that those you talk with will confir after you leave.
    • Committee interview - You will be interviewed by several individuals at the same time. This can be intimidating. Be confident in your preparation and make eye contact with each person as you respond to questions.

    Telephone interviews

    At some point in your job search, you may be invited to participate in a telephone interview. This type of interview is often used when considerations of time and distance preclude a face-to-face meeting. Telephone interviews are generally used only for screening purposes, but they must be taken seriously as they lead to the next step - the all important on-site interview.

    For those who are accustomed to meeting with employers in person, the phone interview poses unique challenges. By anticipating some of these challenges, you can better prepare to deal with them. Through planning, certain aspects of the interview format can be used to your advantage.

    Focus on the Conversation

    You will probably notice that phone interviews tend to be a bit more businesslike than face-to-face meetings. Less time will be spent breaking the ice with informal conversation. Don't take it personally. If you are subsequently invited for a site visit, you can be assured that the interviewer will spend much more time getting to know you. Yet, you should look at the phone interview as an exchange, where you have the opportunity to educate the interviewer about your relevant background and experiences. Don't be afraid to ask questions throughout the conversation. But, be careful not to dominate the entire interview.

    Creative Visualization

    Another characteristic of phone interviews is the lack of nonverbal feedback from the interviewer. When two people meet in person, it is possible for each of them to listen silently while conveying interest in the information that is being shared. By smiling, leaning forward, or nodding his or her head, the listener can provide support and encouragement to the person who is speaking. In a phone interview, it is impossible to provide this type of feedback. Therefore, the candidate must learn to live without it.

    One approach that can be effective is to engage in a bit of "creative visualization." Since you can't see the interviewe, why not picture her/him sitting on the edge of her/his seat, smiling and nodding in approval? This type of image can make periods of silence seem much shorter and less threatening.

    Use Gestures

    The inability to engage in nonverbal communication can place limitations on you, as a candidate. Your words will be more important than ever, since the interviewer will be focusing on what you are saying rather than on how you are saying it. Pay close attention to the content of your speech.

    This is not to say that gestures should not be used. While the interviewer will not benefit from your nonverbal behavior, you will. Although gestures are used primarily for purposes of communication, they also provide the speaker with a means by which to release nervous energy. You may feel a little bit silly, sitting alone in a room and waving your hands around, but it's better than a quivering voice.

    Be Comfortable

    You are the only one who ever has to know what you look like during the interview. In fact, this can be one of the biggest advantages of the phone interview. Employers who meet face-to-face with candidates often form their overall impressions during the first two or three minutes of the interview, and appearances often contribute significantly to the impression that is formed. Telephone interviews can have an equalizing effect that benefits the majority of candidates. Imagine being able to interview in your sweats! Take advantage of the opportunity to dress in your most comfortable clothing. It will help you to feel more relaxed and to perform better in your interview.

    Use Notes

    Another benefit of remaining unseen during your interview is that you can keep notes in front of you, to make sure that you don't overlook any important points in your discussion. At least a day or two before the interview, write down a list of topics that are likely to be raised. Once you have generated a complete list, write up a separate note card for each topic, with related information about your education, experience, and philosophy. You will also want to note any questions that you might have which relate to various aspects of the position and the organization. Also be sure to have a pen and paper handy during the interview, so that you can take notes. Don't forget to write down the name and title of the interviewer!

    Prevent Interruptions

    As the interview time approaches, make sure that you have done all that you can to prevent interruptions. If you have a choice in scheduling the interview, try to pick a time when external demands on you are low, but when your energy level is high. Get a good night's sleep beforehand, to make sure that you will be alert at the time of the interview.

    Write a Thank-You Letter

    Immediately after the interview, review your notes. Make sure all the information that you have written down is clear and complete. Fill in any gaps while the information is still fresh in your mind. Within 24 hours, sit down and write a thank-you letter, just as you would after most interviews. As you write your letter, refer to the material in your notes. Relate your interest in the position to the concerns of the employer, as expressed in the interview, and provide any additional information requested by the interviewer.

    A Word About Conference Calls and Speaker Phones

    One of the most obvious disadvantages of phone interviews is the possibility of technical difficulties. Telephone interviews may be conducted as conference calls, with several interviewers on the line simultaneously. Depending upon the interviewers' level of familiarity with the phone system, there may be a bit of fumbling before the questioning begins. Don't let it throw you. Stay calm and focus on the content of your discussion.

    It is possible that the interview team will use a speaker phone, in which case, you may experience difficulty in hearing some of the questions that are raised. Don't be afraid to ask an interviewer to repeat a question. It is easier than bluffing, and invariably produces better results.

    With preparation and planning, you can excel at the art of phone interviewing. The next step is to prepare for the on-site interview!

    Thank you for completing the alumni survey. This information helps Albion College make improvements through increased understanding of the effectiveness of our programs. To receive your Albion College Alumni Window sticker, please complete the following information. Please keep in mind that you have exited the official survey and information on this page is not considered anonymous or confidential.

    Please enter your first name.
    Please enter your last name.
    Please enter your current employer.
    Please enter your phone number.
    Please enter your street address.
    Please enter a city.
    Please select a state.
    Please enter your ZIP code.
      

    A Program of the American University

    Subjects: Program options: American Politics - Foreign Policy - Global Economics & Business - International Environment & Development - International Law & Organizations - Journalism & New Media - Justice & Law - the Middle East & World Affairs - Peace & Conflict Resolution - Transforming Communities & Public Policy

    An internship is required for each of the program options.

    Prerequisities: 3.0 GPA, junior-level standing, demonstrated maturity.

    Length: Semester or summer.

    Credit: Generally 4.0 units (4 semester hours = 1 Albion College unit) dependent on courses chosen. Includes 1.0 unit of internship credit.

    Housing: On Campus Residence Halls or Off Campus Apartments

    Cost: Albion College tuition plus supplemental covers program tuition. Students may apply for scholarship aid from American University.

    Costs Not Covered by Albion: Travel to/from Washington; housing (various room options are available); food (various meal plans are available); transportation locally and during vacation travel; textbooks (approximately $200-$300); entertainment; miscellaneous personal expenses. Students should keep in mind that Washington is a very expensive city; internships require local transportation and they should budget accordingly.

    Faculty Advisor: Dyron Dabney, 319 Robinson Hall, e-mail:

    Comments: Albion College students may apply for a partial tuition scholarship (up to $2,500) to help reduce the program charges. The program consists of a two-course seminar (study portion), an internship, and a research project. For full details on the summer program, go to: www.american.edu/spexs/summerintern/index.cfm

    Contact:
    Dr. Leroy Miller, Director
    Washington Semester Program
    American University, School of Professional & Extended Studies
    4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
    Washington, D. C. 20016-8083
    Telephone: 202/895-4900
    Fax: 202/895-4960
    E-mail:
    Web: www.american.edu/spexs/washingtonsemester/

    A student consults with Midori Yoshii, associate professor of international studies, during Declare a Major Night 2013.
    Midori Yoshii, associate professor of international studies, advises a student during Declare a Major Night 2013.

     

    Engage your community

    Practical Knowledge

    Congratulations! You have completed your freshman year!

    Albion College is committed to your continued engagement with your community and educational process. During your sophomore year, we have activities and events planned to help you succeed in your college career and beyond.

    Over the next year, you are expected to engage with your Albion College community through participating in:

    • Participate in a community service project

    • The Off-Campus Programs Fair – September 4 from 4:40 p.m. to 7 p.m. (Quad - within Briton Bash)

    • Gerstacker Recruiter's Night – September 10 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. (Science Complex Atrium)
    • LinkedIn Workshop – September 11 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. (Ferguson 111)
    • The Academic Fair – September 26 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. (Science Complex Atrium)

    • LinkedIn Workshop – October 3 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. (Ferguson 111)

    • Career and Internship Center Employer visits during Fall 2013 and Spring 2014

    • Serve the People Event – Spring 2014 (Date, time, and location TBA)

    • Visit with someone from Career and Internship Center about your summer job and tying that into your future

    • Visit with your academic adviser

    • Declare a Major Event – February 10-13 (Career & Internships Center)

    All sophomores will receive a punchcard in their campus mailbox to record attendance at these events and activities. Each time you attend an event, you will receive an entry for the raffle at the Declare a Major Event in the spring (must be present to win).

    Through the Sophomore Year Experience, we aim to make your second year at Albion not just successful, but fulfilling and memorable. If you have questions about the SYE program, please contact the Career and Internship Center and we'll be happy to answer them.

    To develop a confident interview style, you may wish to practice in a "risk-free" atmosphere. A mock interview in the Career and Internship Center serves to help you recognize areas in which you excel as well as areas of improvement that would enhance your interview style.

    All appointments are videotaped. After a 10-15 minute interview, you and your mock interviewer will review the tape and discuss your performance. You will receive a suggestion form after your interview with notes on potential strategies for improvement. The entire appointment typically lasts 45 minutes to 1 hour.

    It is a good idea to prepare for your mock interview in advance. Reading literature on interview techniques and reviewing potential questions will be helpful.

    To schedule a mock interview

    • Contact the Career and Internship Center Office identifying your career interest or position for which you are applying.
    • Bring a résumé to the interview.
    • Dress and groom as you will for the actual interview - we will provide feedback to assure you of the right look.
    • If you would like to keep a videotape of your mock interview, bring a tape.

    We look forward to working with you!

    Writing a personal statement for graduate school applications can feel overwhelming. The purpose of your personal statement is to introduce yourself, explain why you are a good match for the program, market yourself, and entice the admissions committee to positively consider your application. Begin by researching each graduate school you are applying to and learning everything you can about their programs, faculty interests, and requirements for applications.

    The Career and Internship Center is available to discuss the process with you and assist you as you develop your cover letter – simply contact us.

    In addition to Career Development staff, don’t forget the other many resources available to you:

    • Albion faculty – they were successful in their applications
    • Albion alumni and friends who have gone on to graduate school – they have insight into what worked for them and/or what a specific school is looking for
    • Internet sites created by graduate students at various schools – search on the Internet for blogs
    • The writing center – available to assist you in the writing process

    Sometimes all of us need a reminder of how to behave in what could be a stressful situation.

    DO

    • Research the company and specific position ahead of time.
    • Get a good night's sleep before the interview so you will be mentally alert.
    • Leave plenty of time to get to the interview, you should arrive 10-15 minutes early.Never arrive late!
    • Dress properly and appear well groomed.
    • Express enthusiasm.
    • Remember and correctly pronounce the names of the people you meet.
    • Sit up straight, maintain eye contact, and show sincere and polite interest in the position and interviewer.
    • Listen carefully to interview questions and answer completely.
    • Sell your qualifications rather than your need for a job.
    • Ask questions during the interview.
    • Bring additional copies of your resume and list of references.
    • Follow-up the interview with a thank you letter.

    DON'T

    1. Bring others to the interview.
    2. Interrupt the interviewer.
    3. Ask questions about salary and benefits.
    4. Criticize former employers, co-workers, applicants, organizations.
    5. Chew gum.

    The best way to be sure you are prepared for an interview is to do a mock interview in the Career and Internship Center or with faculty specific to the area you are interviewing for. Treat a mock interview as the real thing - dress and all!

    All the time and effort you put into producing a professional/polished résumé should be complemented with a well constructed cover letter. When receiving a letter and résumé, most employers will read the letter first. This means that if you want an employer to give your resume serious consideration, you have to sell yourself in your letter.

    Writing effective letters takes considerable thought and effort. You must reflect not only on your personal objectives, but also on the needs and interests of your reader and the requirements of the situation. Ideally your letters should flow from and be linked to the following career development activities:

    • Assessing your abilities, interests, values and motivations
    • Researching and evaluating occupations and employers
    • Defining your work objectives and career goals
    • Writing a professional resume
    • Planning and implementing your job search campaign
    • Interviewing for job opportunities
    • Choosing appropriate employment

    Even though letter writing most directly supports the last three tasks, it is important to place this activity in the broader context of career planning and your job search. Should you find yourself struggling with your letters, it may be because you have failed to devote the necessary attention to assessing your strengths, researching occupations and employers, and defining your work objectives and career goals.