Emily Crichton O'Hara

In a nutshell, what do you do?
I envision possible visitor experiences, distill expert knowledge into digestible content, and work on teams to build exhibits that excite people about science.
What are you working on right now?
I am the lead content developer for a 3,000-square-foot exhibition about the innovations and impact of human engineering in the Charles River Watershed, scheduled to open in December 2015.
Why do you love what you do?
I get to learn new things every day. In my job, I play the role of a museum visitor, learning about current research and finding the nuggets that will really excite our visitors. My goal is to inspire them to explore more about science and the world around them after they have left the museum.
How did Albion help you get there?
While at Albion, I had the ability to take classes in a multitude of fields. Even though I was an art major, also taking classes in math and science helped me gain a broad knowledge base. I was also able to participate in a museum internship my senior year. Together, these experiences have given me the ability to communicate with scientists and translate their expert understanding of a topic to a larger audience of general museum visitors.
For me, Albion...
...provided opportunities to explore the world beyond my passions, encouraged me to stretch my mind to places where it was uncomfortable, and put me in situations where I had to clearly articulate my ideas. These experiences gave me the foundation on which I have built my current career.
Anything else you’d like to add?
Students should take advantage of the opportunities that come with a liberal arts education. Even though the world sometimes projects a specialist education as the only option, you will end up competing for jobs with people who look exactly like you on paper. At a liberal arts college, you will be pushed outside your comfort zone and this will empower you more than you can imagine—you may find connections that strengthen your understanding or reveal a new way of looking at problems in your own field, or even discover a new path that interests you. These are vital skills that you will need to be successful after college.

Take It Further: Museum of Science, Boston; Art and Art History Department; Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program

Rudy Aronoff

In a nutshell, what do you do?
I manage the day-to-day operations, anything from scheduling client appointments to managing packing/moving/installation of important public, corporate and private art collections. I also conduct research and valuation on a daily basis. Basically I play a giant game of Tetris with art, objects and people.
What are you working on right now?
I am currently dealing with getting two artists' estates in order as well as moving a large private collection from Chicago to Florida. Oh, also all the small day-to-day appraisals that need to get off of my desk!
Why do you love what you do?
I never know how my days will go, or where I might end up for that matter. We pride ourselves on our ability to be everywhere at once, not limited by region. I never know where I might find myself at the end of the day.
How did Albion help you get there?
Working with the fabulous professors at Albion taught me that flexibility, problem solving and thinking a situation through to every eventual outcome has gotten me where I am today.
For me, Albion...
...was the jumping-off point for a great start to a successful career. The ability to work as a research assistant was one of the most beneficial experiences I had as an undergrad. Not to mention the ability to marry multiple disciplines in the Art Department. Having a formal art historical education as well as the ability to tangibly create art at the same time was key to why I went to Albion and have been successful afterward.
Anything else you’d like to add?
Never discount fine art majors. We have more skills and ingenuity than you can imagine!

Take It Further: Art and Art History Department, Anthropology and Sociology Department, Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity (FURSCA)

Josh Hicks

In a nutshell, what do you do?
I anchor The Washington Post’s Federal Eye blog and write for the newspaper, focusing on accountability journalism and feature reporting.
What are you working on right now?
Blogging about news as it happens, cranking out daily newspaper reports and juggling a few in-depth reporting projects.
Why do you love what you do?
I write for a living, hold authorities accountable and learn a great deal every day. Also because the White House answers my questions.
How did Albion help you get there?
It’s all about the liberal arts education. It taught me to think and learn, which is critical in journalism. Familiarity with Albion professors also helped—it’s one of the bonuses of small class sizes. I reached out to Ian MacInnes for a grad-school recommendation nine years after taking his course on Milton in the English Department. Luckily, he still remembered me, and his letter helped me earn a spot in Stanford’s graduate journalism program, where I polished my skills and met the connections that brought me to the Post
For me, Albion...
...is a place where I explored, found my passion and began working toward my dreams. The faculty members taught me to think critically, helped me develop new skills and came through when I needed them. Overall, the school delivered on its promise of individual attention and a well-rounded education. It was a great place for personal development and relationship building.
Anything else you'd like to add?
I always wanted to make a living as a writer, but I took an indirect path toward that goal and made the most of it. After graduating from Albion, I packed a bag and bought a one-way ticket to New Zealand, where I worked as a commercial fisherman and fruit picker—writers need experience. After that, I returned stateside and held a series of manual-labor and restaurant jobs before moving to Seattle and working for suburban newspapers. From there, I went to grad school, interned with The Philadelphia Inquirer and landed a spot at The Washington Post.

Take It Further: The Post's Federal Eye blog, English Department

Amanda Boundy

In a nutshell, what do you do?
I recently transitioned from a performance career into the field of arts administration. At FCS, I execute the performance season for nine youth choirs and one adult symphonic chorus. I also help to manage the fundraising, outreach and marketing activities for the organization.
What are you working on right now?
We just completed our December performances that consisted of two youth concerts, one adult concert, three outreach performances and one fundraising event. This month we will begin preparing for three March concerts, which include a partnership with the Fairfax County Public Schools and a performance of Ralph Vaughan Williams works in collaboration with the Amadeus Orchestra.
Why do you love what you do?
I get a thrill when FCS singers take the stage. This is especially true of our youth choruses. Music education and outreach have become my passion, and seeing the camaraderie that develops among these young singers really brings me back to why I love choral music. It is the team sport of singing and really creates a special community. Every year we ask our seniors to write about their experience with FCS so we can share it in the program of their final concert. Last season, a young singer wrote about how he planned to end his life, but attending choir rehearsals brought him back from that dark place. I love what I do because it is so important.
How did Albion help you get there?
I never would have become a singer, and then an arts administrator, if I did not attend Albion. Several professors in the Music Department saw something in me that I was not aware of as an 18-year-old first-year. The Music faculty offered me my first choral solo, first role in an opera, first time singing with an orchestra, first competition win, and even a couple of professional gigs. They were the first people who told me that music was not just a crazy dream, but a legitimate professional goal.
For me, Albion...
...is a place to discover who you are supposed to be.

Take It Further: Music Department, Anthropology and Sociology Department

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