Program Requirements

In the "Academic at Albion" section of this catalog, the College’s core curriculum is described. Part II of this curriculum requires that all students take a course that will introduce them to each of the following five Modes of Inquiry:

  1. Textual Analysis
  2. Artistic Creation and Analysis
  3. Scientific Analysis
  4. Modeling and Analysis
  5. Historical and Cultural Analysis

Since each Honors course fulfills a Modes of Inquiry requirement of the College’s core curriculum, Honors students can satisfy as many as four of this five-course requirement with Honors classes. Additionally, Honors students can satisfy part of the College’s distribution requirement (one fine arts course, two humanities courses, two science courses and two social science courses) by taking Honors seminars.

Students take four Honors courses, one from each of the four divisions of the College.

All courses to meet the Honors core must be taken for a numerical grade.

To guide Honors students in their selection of Great Issues courses, the following numbering system is used:

HSP 12xH—Natural Science & Mathematics HSP 1x1H—Textual Analysis
HSP 13xH—Humanities HSP 1x2H—Artistic Creation and Analysis
HSP 15xH—Social Sciences HSP 1x3H—Scientific Analysis
HSP 17xH—Fine Arts HSP 1x4H—Modeling and Analysis
HSP 1x5H—Historical and Cultural Analysis

For example, HSP 154H would be a Great Issues in Social Science seminar that satisfies the Modeling and Analysis Mode.

Introduction

Although they are not separated from the campus at large, students in the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program do enroll in four unique Honors seminar courses in their first three years. Great Issues in Science, Humanities, Social Science and Fine Arts all explore topics of current interest through the use of classical and contemporary readings. Through their small size, discussion format and emphasis on critical thinking and writing, these special courses encourage students to value ideas and to play active roles in their own intellectual development. They also fulfill the special core curriculum for Honors students.

Admission—Students must be admitted to the Brown Honors Program. Visit the program's website for admission requirements and information on the application process.

Faculty and Staff

E. Dale Kennedy, director, Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program; professor of biology.
B.A., 1975, College of Wooster; M.A., 1979, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ph.D., 1989, Rutgers University.

Honors Program Courses

HSP 12xH Great Issues in Science (1)
A seminar for Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program students in which they read and discuss classic and modern works in the history, philosophy, methodology and ethics of science and technology. All seminars fulfill one of the Modes of Inquiry requirements of the College's core curriculum. Staff.

HSP 13xH Great Issues in Humanities (1)
A seminar for Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program students in which they read and discuss classic and modern works of philosophers and humanists. All seminars fulfill one of the Modes of Inquiry requirements of the College's core curriculum. Staff.

HSP 15xH Great Issues in Social Science (1)
A seminar for Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program students in which they read and discuss classic and modern works on methodology, philosophy and policy issues in the social sciences. All seminars fulfill one of the Modes of Inquiry requirements of the College's core curriculum. Staff.

HSP 17xH Great Issues in Fine Arts (1)
A seminar for Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program students in which they explore, through representative readings, exhibits, concerts, performances and lectures, major issues in the development of the fine arts: the relationship between the artist and society, the evolution of critical theory in the arts and the nature of creativity. Individual courses may focus on the visual arts, music, theatre, film or dance. All seminars fulfill one of the Modes of Inquiry requirements of the College's core curriculum. Staff.

HSP 289H Selected Topics (1)
Prerequisite: Permission of the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program director.
An examination of a special topic which is not included in the regular curriculum. Staff.

HSP 397H Thesis Development Colloquy (1/4)
A workshop open to Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program juniors and second semester sophomores which guides them through the process of finding and developing a thesis topic and assembling a thesis committee. Students also develop their library research and other thesis-related skills. In the semester they enroll in the colloquy, Honors students may take up to 4 3/4 units without additional tuition charge. Offered on a credit no credit basis. Staff.

HSP 422H Honors Thesis (1/2-1)
Directed independent study leading to the submission of an Honors Thesis. Normally, students begin their thesis research in the second semester of their junior year by enrolling for 1/2 unit of Honors Thesis credit with their thesis adviser. This process continues during the students' senior year when they normally take another one to two units of Honors Thesis credit in order to complete their research and write up their results. In the semesters they enroll for Honors Thesis credit, Honors students may take up to five units (where 1/2 unit is for thesis credit) without additional tuition charge.