Meet Our Students

Brittany Middlebrook

Brittany MiddlebrookBrittany Middlebrook, Gerstacker Institute Coordinator

BA, 2014, Michigan State University

Office: Robinson 106
Phone: 517/629-0418
Email:

Brittany is a linguist whose primary interest is the relationship between language and culture. Her foreign language studies have included French, German, and Spanish (with wholehearted optimism to study more)! She received her B.A. in Linguistics from Michigan State University, where her desire to work in higher education was ignited. Brittany has always been an advocate for diversity and education – working previously in the Admissions department at Baker College of Jackson. From this experience, her passion for student development and success rapidly grew – resulting in her enthusiastic step to become a part of the Albion College team. Brittany resides in Jackson and enjoys hiking, rollerblading, cooking, and traveling in her spare time.

Kim Tunnicliff Endowment

Kim TunnicliffKim Tunnicliff started his career at Albion College in 1984 when he became a faculty member in the Political Science Department. As director of the then-named Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Service from 1985 to 1999, he placed a special emphasis on developing experiential and international educational experiences for college students. He was highly regarded by his academic colleagues both at Albion and beyond.

Kim's passionate belief in public service brought the level of opportunities for Ford students to new heights that have carried them forward to leadership positions all over the globe. This endowment was established by his family, former students, colleagues, and friends to celebrate his life and the widespread and enduring impact of his legacy at Albion College.

2014 Recipient

Utrata2smallDavid Utrata, ’15

David Utrata is a member of the Ford Institute and the Center for Sustainability and the Environment. As Albion College's first-ever Kim Tunnicliff Fellow, David Utrata spent a semester in Stellenbosch, South Africa. The CIEE Stellenbosch Sustainability and Community study abroad program engages students in a variety of sustainability-related issues that impact present-day South Africa. David will deliver a public presentation on campus summarizing his research in Spring 2015.

Meet Our Alumni

It's a tradition going on four decades strong: Gerstacker students become successful and accomplished Gerstacker alumni. Through their efforts both in and out of the classroom, they are well prepared for the workplace and are often making a mark not long after graduating from Albion.

Meet some recent graduates below and see where their Gerstacker experience has taken them.

Kyle Alsheskie, '15Kyle Alsheskie, ’15

Associate Auditor
KPMG

Alex Archer, '13Alex Archer, ’13

Zone Manager
Ford Motor Co.

Mallory Brown, '08Mallory Brown, ’08

Founder and CEO
World Clothes Line

David Budka, '13David Budka, ’13

Financial Analyst
Dow Corning

Aaron Croad, '12Aaron Croad, ’12

Data Analytics Consultant
Ernst & Young

Blake DeCarlo, '09Blake DeCarlo, ’09

Account Executive
Bella Design Group

DeckerA64x91Alex Decker, ’15

Assurance Practice
Ernst & Young

Caroline Dobbins, '12Caroline Dobbins, ’12

Fellow, Challenge Detroit
Leadership Program

Marisa Fortuna, '07Marisa Fortuna, ’07

Graduate Student
Ford School of Public Policy
University of Michigan

Brooke Kaltz, '05Brooke Kaltz, ’05

Non-Production Material Network Management Americas
Mercedes-Benz USA

Sumedha Makker, '11Sumedha Makker, ’11

MBA Candidate
Class of 2017 at Indiana University Kelley School of Business

Trent Mikek, '15Trent Mikek, ’15

Ernst & Young

D.J. Mocini, '08D.J. Mocini, ’08

Assistant Men's Basketball Coach
Northwood University

MyersA64x91Amber Myers, ’13

Pursuing a JD at Michigan State University College of Law

Marty Nesbitt, '85Marty Nesbitt, ’85

Co-Owner, The Vistria Group
Treasurer,'08 and '12 Obama
presidential campaigns

Doug Parker, '84Doug Parker, ’84

Chief Executive Officer
American Airlines Group

John Pearce, '11John Pearce, ’11

Quantitative Analyst
Northpointe Capital

Kathleen Petchell, '13Kathleen Petchell, ’13

Completed Masters of Accountancy, U of M Tax Associate
Plante Moran

Moose Scheib, '02Moose Scheib, ’02

Founder and CEO
LoanMod.com

Victoria Slater, '14Victoria Slater, ’14

Completed program in December 2013; graduate study at London School of Economics (Fall 2014)

Connie Van Onselder, '84Connie Van Onselder, ’84

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Keeneland Association

Centers and Institutes

You’ll live in the real world. Prepare to succeed there now.

That's the genius behind Albion's Centers and Institutes. Regardless of your academic and career interests, these programs add value through specialized academic offerings and opportunities. Put your learning to work through internships, research and other pre-professional experiences. Give yourself a distinct advantage when applying to graduate or professional school. Or landing your first job after graduation.

Our Centers and Institutes…

  • Enhance your academic major

  • Build self-confidence and leadership skills

  • Develop your problem-solving and communication skills valued by employers

  • Create a community of students who share your interests and aspirations

  • Connect you with alumni for networking and career relationships

Course Schedule & Descriptions: SPRING 2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CAN BE FOUND UNDER THE SCHEDULE:

SUBJ CRS# SEC CRN COURSE TITLE DAYS TIME BLDG INSTRUCTOR
HSP 125  1H  3449 G. I. in Science Thursdays   7:00 - 10:00 Palenske Dan Skean
HSP 124 1M 3344 G. I. in Science  M  W  F 10:30 - 11:35 Observatory Doug White
HSP 131 1T 3237 G.I. in Humanities T  Th 10:30 - 12:20 Vulg 202 Mary Collar
HSP 131 2T 3345 G.I. in Humanities M W    2:15 -  4:05 Observatory Emanuel Yewah
HSP 155 1H 3260 G. I. in Social Sci M W F   9:15 - 10:20 Observatory Deborah Kanter
HSP 155 2H 3346 G. I. in Social Sci T  TH 10:30 - 12:20 Rob 403 Patrick McLean
HSP 155 1T 3347 G. I. in Social Sci T  TH   2:15 -   4:05 Rob 203 Andy Grossman
HSP 172 1A 3349 G. I. in Fine Arts T  TH   2:15 -  4:05 Observatory Lia Jensen-Abbott
HSP 172 1A 3348 G. I. in Fine Arts T  TH   10:30 - 12:30 Ceramics Annx Lynne Chytilo
HSP 397H 1 3350 Thesis Development T     7:00 -  8:00 Observatory Kennedy, E. Dale
                     

 

 SPRING 2017 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

Great Issues in Humanities  -  Mystery, Manners, Modernisms and Me
HSP 131    CRN  3237
Tuesday & Thursday    10:30 – 12:20
Vulgamore 202
Dr. Mary Collar

Course Description:
This course examines the response of thinkers, many of them literary artists, to the death of god, the idea that Nietzsche put at the center of thought for himself and for many of the moderns.   Even writers not directly influenced by Nietzsche have been haunted by the implications of such a philosophical orientation and have asked to what extent a death-of-God stance would necessarily reorient the artistic gaze away from Truth and towards the social good.    At mid-century, the American writer Flannery O'Connor uses the terms Mystery and Manners to designate these two realms; near the century’s end, the Indian writer Salman Rushdie contends that the conflict between the sacred and the secular poses the central aesthetic question for any modern writer.  Also in this late modern period, some thinkers use Nietzsche to undermine fundamental conceptions of human identify.  The goal of this HSP course is to expose and explore these tensions among competing and often contradictory visions, to provoke in students intelligent reflection upon some great issues surrounding truth, goodness, and beauty. 

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of Honors Humanities, you may not take this course unless you have written permission of Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

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Great Issues in Humanities  -  Law and Literature
HSP 131     CRN 3345
2:15 – 4:05    Monday, Wednesday
Observatory
Dr. Emmanuel Yewah

Course Description:
This course draws from a wide range of sources including novels, short stories and/or films and theoretical materials to establish the link between law and literature. It also explores such issues as text, legal ideology, storytelling techniques by writers and litigants in a courtroom, marginalization, language, the questions of evidence, etc.  Additionally, it seeks to understand writers’ contributions to the indigenous and received traditions in the law through legal narratives that illuminate some aspects of the law or, indeed, raise fundamental questions about those traditions.

Evaluation of the course will be based on attendance, attentive reading of assigned materials prior to class, active participation in class discussions, three critical essays (or the student’s own creative work), and a reasonable length term paper.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of Honors Humanities, you may not take this course unless you have written permission of Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

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Great Issues in Science:  -  The NATURAL HISTORY OF LOVE
HSP 124   CRN 3344

Monday, Wednesday, Friday    10:30-11:35
Observatory
Douglas White

Course Description:
Exploration of the nature and function of love in humans from the perspectives of evolutionary biology, ornithology, brain science, anthropology, psychology, mythology, and the arts.  What is love?  Why do we love?  How is love important? 

Love is virtually absent from Albion’s catalog.  Yet, love is a topic of deep and universal personal and societal interest.  Love is systemic to many and disparate academic disciplines.  And, Albion needs love to flourish.  Here, we break through obscuring jargon, silos, and silence, first by considering the breeding biology of birds.  Can we see love there in revealing variety?  We move on to examine how modern sciences of neurobiology, anthropology, and psychology are being used to characterize human love.  Do they have it right?  Do people and birds pick mates in similar ways?  Next, we will see if love, in its expansive sense, relates to the human subconscious as revealed by comparative mythology.  Where is your bliss?  Finally, we will test our biologically-informed models of love against meditations on love prized in drama and music.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of Honors Science, you may not take this course unless you have written permission of Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

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Great Issues in Science  -  Florida: Paradise Lost
HSP 125   CRN 3449

Thursdays          7:00 – 10:00pm
Dr. Dan Skean

Course Description:
This course is an introduction to the biodiversity and natural ecosystems of Florida and the environmental challenges imposed upon them by the demands of development and tourism. A field trip to Florida over spring break (March 3-11), is required at an additional cost.

Topics include environmental issues surrounding agriculture (citrus, sugar cane, and vegetables), freshwater availability, storm protection, and coastal development, all in the face of climate change and rising sea levels. Readings include natural history texts, novels, and primary scientific literature. The mandatory field trip introduces participants to the subtropical terrestrial and marine ecosystems of the Florida Keys, the sawgrass of the Everglades, the sloughs and swamps of Big Cypress, and the unique and endemic sand pine scrub of the Lake Wales ridge. If all goes well, we plan to end at Sea World in Orlando, with a behind-the-scenes tour of their animal rehabilitation and marine conservation efforts. You may have been to Florida, but you have never see it like this!

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking any Great Issues in Honors Science course, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from E. Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration.

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Great Issues in Social Science  -  After the Melting Pot: Issues in 20th-Century  U.S. Immigration
HSP 155     CRN  3260
Monday, Wednesday, Friday     9:15 – 10:20am
Observatory

Dr. Deborah Kanter

Course Description:
The role of immigrants in the U.S., a “nation of immigrants,” has been debated since the founding era. This seminar looks both at the experience and myths of immigration, as well as the debates over immigration’s place in the 20th-century U.S.

How has immigration changed since the arrival of the predominantly European “huddled masses” of a century ago?  Ellis Island holds a strong place in our national consciousness, but many American families first entered the U.S. in the past century at Angel Island, El Paso, JFK, or LAX. The U.S. population currently includes an all-time high number of foreign-born individuals, mostly from nations well beyond Europe: what does this hold for the future? How have attitudes toward immigration changed with the rise and fall of different notions of race?

The class will consider immigration through history, ethnography, demography, literature, film, and sociology. Amidst our general readings, the seminar will focus on three main immigrant groups: East European Jews, Mexicans, and South Asians. Students will have the opportunity to research other immigrant groups.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of Honors Social Science, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

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Great Issues in Social Science  -  Canada: More than Snow, Hockey & Maple Syrup
HSP 155H   CRN 3346
Tuesday & Thursday 10:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.
Robinson Hall 403
Dr. Patrick McLean

Course Descritpion:
This course is designed to introduce students to Canada and Canadian society from a range of vantage points.  We will examine the history, culture, politics, society, literature, arts and the strong regional differences within the country to our north through readings, discussions, guest lectures, film and travel.  We also will examine the highly asymmetrical relationship between Canada and the United States and the influence each has on the other.

Canada offers a convenient lens through which to view our own country.  Canada’s history parallels that of the US at times, but represents a very different response to colonial rule.  Canada retains a strong set of regional identities, including a linguistic minority that influences every facet of the country’s history.  Canada has developed through its Canadian content laws a vibrant arts, culture and literary scene.  Canada has followed a less assimilationist approach toward immigrants, resulting in a “Vertical Mosaic” compared to the American Melting Pot.

This course includes a required, week-long trip taken during Spring Break 2017 that will provide students with an opportunity to visit Parliament in Ottawa, a series of incredible museums, and to explore Toronto, Ottawa and several other cities in Ontario and Quebec.  Last year’s trip even included an NHL hockey game

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of Honors Social Science, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dr. Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration.

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Great Issues in the Social Sciences  -  “Savage ‘Little’ Wars: Narratives of   Counterinsurgency Warfare in Film                                                                       and in Practice 1963-2013”
151       CRN 3347
Tuesday, Thursday     2:15pm – 4:05pm 
Rob. 203
Dr. Andy Grossman
 

Course Description:
This honors seminar is framed by a puzzle which is best considered as a question: How is it that a military strategy, “Counterinsurgency” (COIN) that has failed so often and so systematically can continue to be held in high regard by political and military elites in countries such as the United States?

In thinking about this question, we  will analyze how COIN has been viewed by national security and military elites (post-World War II generals in particular) as a long-term strategy to fight asymmetric wars:  that is, post-Colonial conflicts, conflicts that arise in “failed states,” and, finally, the  problematic “global war on terrorism”— i.e., the post 9/11 strategies for asymmetric war. 

We will take two approaches to the analysis in the seminar. 1). The consideration of how COIN tactics have been portrayed in film; that is, how narratives are used in film to establish a particular kind of thinking. 2). A careful and close reading of important academic literature in the national security, war-fighting, and policy history scholarship. This aspect to our seminar aims at a fuller understanding of how military strategy has adjusted to modern asymmetric warfare and why COIN regularly reemerges with a new gloss, as the “go to” tactic/strategy for countries such as the United States.

As regards the use of film, the seminar will examine how COIN has been portrayed  in popular film as a means to either support or raise questions about so-called “small wars” and the tactics associated with these types of conflicts. We will view films representing various points of view.   We will also consider questions about how the use of film narratives (drawing on the work of Hayden White and others) can reconstruct a particular context (opposing realities if you will) that lends support to counter-insurgency warfare or, undermines this strategy.

The second approach will be reading intensive referencing the literature on the military strategies of asymmetric warfare emphasizing the perspective of those on the “receiving end” as it were, of counter-insurgency operations.  I would like us to  focus specifically on why COIN tactics and strategies seem to continue to garner significant purchase among the military, even in light of its abject historical failure (save a few instances in modern history).  Why is this the case?  That is the what the seminar is about.

The course will entail both a close reading of two types of texts: film and literature. Short papers follow each film. One final paper for the course. 

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of Honors Social Science, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

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Great Issues Issues in Fine Arts  -  Ceramics and the Industrial Revolution
HSP 172   CRN  3348
Tuesday & Thursday     10:30am-12:30pm
Ceramics Annex
Lynne Chytilo

Course Description:
Ceramics and the Industrial Revolution is an interdisciplinary course that engages students in producing handmade pottery while tracing the history and commerce of the ceramics industry from pre-industrial times to the 1920s. Students will learn to make and fire clay objects in the studio, starting with hand forming techniques and later using plaster molds, while taking part in discussions from readings about how the industrial revolution changed many aspects of the world. Each student will find a research topic related to cultural changes during the Industrial Revolution and present their findings to the class. Emphasis will be placed on student-facilitated learning, exploration, discovery, and collaborative processes.

NO CERAMICS EXPERIENCE NEEDED

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of Honors Fine Arts you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

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Great Issues in Fine Arts  -
HSP 172     CRN 3349
Tuesday & Thursday    2:15 – 4:05pm
Observatory
Dr. Lia Jensen-Abbott

Course Description:
This class will explore the relevance of all the arts in society, culture, and education.  As a microcosm of trends nationwide, the course will assess Albion's lack of funding for arts programs and perhaps try to come up with some ideas for this community.  The course will have three components: 

  1. individual exploration of students’ own needs, appreciation, etc. for the arts;
  2. We will read/research aesthetic philosophy/theory as well as some statistical research and analysis, and bring in speakers. 
  3. The final component will involve working in this community—the class will brainstorm a project with the ultimate goal of putting into place some new arts initiative. 

We may travel to see plays, museums, music performances, etc., along with speakers.  The course will involve different types of writing—journals, research based papers, and a final project.

Class trip to Chicago or Detroit DIA to get some direct experience of the things we will be covering in class --- visit to the art museum, etc….

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of Honors Fine Arts, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy

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FALL 2016 SCHEDULE - Descriptions are below

CRS# SEC CRN COURSE TITLE DAYS TIME BLDG INSTRUCTOR
123H 1S 2148 G. I. in Science M W F 11:45 - 12:35 Olin 230 Wilson, W. Jeff
123HL 1 2149 Laboratory R   9:15 - 11:15 Wilson, W. Jeff
124H 1M 2070 G. I. in Science  MTWF   1:00 -   2:15 Observatory Bollman, Mark
125H 1H 2367 G. I. in Science  MWF   9:15 - 10:20 Observatory Roy, Marc
131 1T 2480 G.I. in Humanities M W F   1:00 - 2:05 Vulg. 301 Judy Lockyer
151H 1T 2368 G. I. in Social Sci M W    2:15 -  4:05 Olin Yoshii, Midori
154H 1M 2184 G. I. in Social Sci T R    2:15 -  4:05 Norris 100 Saltzman, Greg
155H 1H 2369 G. I. in Social Sci M W    2:15 -  4:05 Rob 203 Walling, Carrie
175H 1H 2371 G. I. in Fine Arts T  R 10:30 - 12:20 Goodrich 145 Abbott, David
172 1A 2370 G. I. in Fine Arts M  W   2:15 -   4:05 Obsevatory Balke, Maureen
397H 1 2372 Thesis Develpmnt T    7:00 -  8:00 Observatory Kennedy, E. Dale 

 

FALL 2016 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Great Issues in Fine Arts
Music and the Holocaust
HSP 175   CRN  2371
Tuesday & Thursday    10:30-12:20 p.m. -  145 Goodrich Chapel
David Abbott

This class will explore the role of music of European music between 1925-50, a time of immense social, political and cultural turmoil.  Students will study and learn about the conditions and climate for artistic expression, including music composed under socialist patronage as well as a reaction or resistance to government and social repression.  This will include works created and performed in ghettos and concentration camps in situations of extreme impoverishment, cruelty and terror.  These activities constitute artistic attempts at survival, witness and resistance.

Students will be exposed to music and in some cases art, that is, the cultural “artifacts” created in a place and time that is significantly removed from the experience of American students in 21st century.  To help connect more directly with this historical period, lectures by Holocaust survivors and a visit to Holocaust Museum are part of the course curriculum.  After studying the circumstances of music composed and performed during the period of the holocaust, students will be directed to investigate and reflect on how people in the present day are continuing to be uprooted from their culture and environment and in many cases be faced with extinction.

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Great Issues in Fine Arts
“From the Ballroom to Hell” – Schubert’s Vienna ca. 1815
HSP 172     CRN  2370
Monday & Wednesday  2:15 - 4:05pm  -  Observatory
Maureen Balke

This course will look at Vienna around 1815—its background of Napoleonic war, politics, censorship, secret police, and rapidly changing society, as well as the diversions young people sought out to “escape” from unpleasant reality. 

These diversions ranged from grand public spectacle (major concerts, opera, the theatre, grand balls, celebrity virtuosos) to the intimate salon and Schubertiade, held in private homes and including poetry, song, and tableaux.  

To counter the horrors and chaos of war and the battlefield (where men reigned), the ballroom in particular became the dominion of the ladies, including the development of elaborate rituals and games concerning costume, etiquette and dance.    In tandem with dramatic and rapid changes in dress from the French aristocratic model to the more free and form-revealing “Josephine” style, new and scandalous dances (such as the Waltz—but not at all the sedate version we know today!) developed.  Ballroom “games” for choosing one’s dance partner, including “The Mirror” and “Whips and Reins”, frequently resulted in embarrassment and great hilarity.   Secret messages could be sent to a lover through glove and handkerchief flirtations.  All these activities were a form of “escape” within “safe” societal boundaries.

This class will study the political, social, and musical context in which all these reactions to the times developed.  We will study the Congress of Vienna and read the diary of a Napoleonic footsoldier.  We will read etiquette and dance manuals from the period, and look at historical costume and hairstyles.  We will listen to music of Schubert and his contemporaries, and look at some of the poetry Schubert chose to set to music. 

We will present our findings in a combination Schubertiade/salon/ball in a public performance near the end of the semester.   The evening will contain music, historical skits, dance, costume, games, and all will participate/contribute, each according to interests and abilities.

You do NOT have to be a dancer, singer, actor, poet, or musician in order to contribute.  You do NOT have to be a historian or a political scientist.  But if you have special interest or ability in any of these areas, that contribution will be welcome!

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Great Issues in Science
8 Big Ideas That Shaped Science
HSP 124   CRN 2070
1:00 – 2:15pm
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday - Observatory
Dr. Mark Bollman

This course will examine eight major scientific ideas, each one of which has had a revolutionary impact on a particular area of science.

Astronomy: Big Bang theory                            Biochemistry: DNA structure
Biology: Evolution                                            Chemistry: Periodic Law
Computer science: Information theory             Geology: Plate tectonics
Mathematics: Non-Euclidean geometry           Physics: Atomic structure

In several cases, students will read the original papers that reported the discovery. Laboratory work with Geometer’s Sketchpad will be used to explore the world of hyperbolic geometry.  Evaluation will be based on a sequence of short papers, a collection of laboratory reports from Sketchpad, and a substantial final project.

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Great Issues in Science:
Neurophysiology for Beginners
HSP 123     CRN 2148  / Lab CRN 2149
Monday, Wednesday, Friday = 11:45 – 12:35  Olin 230
Thursday LAB = 9:15 – 11:15am  Olin 234
Dr. Jeff Wilson

Everything that you do, feel, think, perceive… basically everything that matters to you… is the result of activity in your nervous system.  Individual cells called “neurons” communicate with one another to create your mind.  In “Neurophysiology for Beginners” we will learn about the activity of neurons: how they work, how they encode sensory information, how they control movement, perhaps how they produce emotions and mental activity.  The course will provide an overview of the history of our understanding of neurons, and will include many experiments and/or demonstrations that illustrate the concepts that we address.  You will also gain a basic understanding of simple instrumentation used to study the nervous system.  Because neurons are comparable across species, we can learn about your neurons by studying the neurons of simpler organisms like invertebrates; many of the lab experiences will focus on neurophysiology in cockroaches and earthworms, but we will also at times examine the neurons of students.  A specific lab period is scheduled, but lecture time will also be devoted on occasion to laboratory-related experiences and discussion.  Students will be expected to maintain a lab notebook in which they record methodology and observations of each lab.  Students will also write up three of the labs (literature review, methodology, results, and discussion) according to APA style – these write-ups will be graded.  Finally, each student will design an individual experiment that extends one of the studies that we conducted in lab, ideally providing information about some as yet unanswered question in the literature.

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Great Issues in Science
SEX AND GENDER, NATURE AND NURTURE
HSP 125    CRN 2367
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  -  9:15 – 10:20am    Observatory
Dr. Marc Roy

In this course, we will examine how biological factors interact with physical, social, and cultural factors to influence the expression of sex and gender in a variety of animals, including humans.  From the earliest possible moments, sometimes even before birth, we identify individuals as females and males.  Gender roles and identities are reinforced from birth with the clothes we dress infants in and the toys we give them.  But what makes us males and females?  Sex and gender are concepts that have been studied from a variety of perspectives and disciplines.  Are they the same things?  What leads to differences in sex and gender?  While some people have argued that biological factors are the primary factors that determine if an individual is female or male, others have argued that these terms are socially constructed and that social and cultural factors are the primary determinants of sex and gender. 

Our understanding of sex and gender has changed historically and is understood differently in different cultures.  Also in this course, we will examine how these constructs, along with sexual orientation, have changed over time.  We will also explore how gender and sexual orientation are understood and expressed in several different cultures and social groups (e.g. religious groups, race, and ethnicity), including those that the students may have encountered in their lives.  We will use texts from several disciplines including biology, psychology, and anthropology. 

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Great Issues in Social Science
Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
Greg Saltzman
HSP 154    CRN  2184
Tuesday & Thursday   2:15 – 4:05 PM  -  Norris 100

This course will help you learn how to secure agreements between two or more interdependent parties in order to get things done.  It draws from theories and concepts related to negotiation developed in microeconomics (game theory, Pareto efficiency), psychology (cognitive biases), and labor relations (integrative bargaining).  Numerous role-playing exercises will enhance students' skills as negotiators, through repeated practice.  This course also should help students become more aware of their own ethical values and personality traits.

Who Should Take This Course?

A course on negotiation and dispute resolution is especially important for students preparing for future roles as:

  • Lawyers                                                Managers
  • Public officials                                       Human services professionals
  • Environmental advocates                     Community group leaders

The principles of negotiation learned from this course should be broadly applicable to many contexts, such as law, business, international relations, and public policy.  I do not, however, emphasize the kind of intensely emotional interpersonal negotiations that a marital therapist or family therapist might facilitate.

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Great Issues in Social Science
DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION
HSP 155    CRN 2369
Monday & Wednesday  2:15 – 4:05pm  -  Observatory
Dr. Carrie Booth-Walling

In 1942 only twelve countries in the world could call themselves democracies. Less than 70 years later, there are more than 115 electoral democracies globally. Democracies continue to emerge, elections continue to be held, and popular decision-making continues to take root. This is staggering given the challenges that we face globally today: religious extremism, political violence and terrorism, global poverty, conflict, war, devastating natural disasters, global health challenges such as HIV/AIDS, and increased strain upon the environment, to name only a few.

Despite this hopeful news, challenges remain for those countries undergoing democratic transitions. These new democracies are all but stable, their transitions far from certain. Even our own stable and prosperous democracy, often fails to live up to the ideals of popular sovereignty, transparency, accountability, and checks upon state power.  This is a class about democratization—in short, how countries become, and how they stay, democratic. We will examine the meaning and importance of democratic institutions, the ways in which democratic transitions emerge, and the challenges in “consolidating” democratic transitions—in short, ensuring that democracy (rather than violence, authoritarianism, or military rule) becomes “the only game in town.”

We will examine case studies of democratization from various regions of the world in order to better understand the causes of democratic transition and democracy’s consolidation.  Because it is a presidential election year in the United States we will also focus our attention on evaluating the health and strength of the American democracy.  We will also look at the successful and failed democratic transitions underway in parts of the Middle East.  Students will have the opportunity to examine democratic waves in other regions (like Europe and Latin America as part of the third wave of democracy).   As the introduction above suggests, this class could not be more important and timely.

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Great Issues in Social Science
U.S. Foreign Policy Since 1945
HSP 151     CRN  2368
Monday & Wednesday  2:15pm – 4:05pm  -  Olin
Associate Professor of International Studies, Midori Yoshii

This course analyzes U.S. foreign policy from 1945 to present through documents. Students are required to participate in class discussions and write a research paper based on the State Department documents, Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS). They will learn how to read and interpret official documents and memoirs of policy makers. The class activities also include critique of contemporary media coverage and films related to American diplomacy. Special attention is paid to the policies by the Kennedy and Johnson administrations in the 1960s and the Middle Eastern policies under Reagan and Bush Sr. in the 1980s and early 1990s.

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Great Issues in Humanities
Funny Women:  Irony, Humor, and Satire in U.S. Women’s Writing
HSP 131    CRN 2480
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:00-2:00pm  -  Vulgamore 302
Dr. Judy Lockyer

Bring your sense of humor to this class.  Some people seriously argue that women can’t be funny because women aren’t funny.  Not so, say the women we’ll be reading.

Students in this seminar will begin with discussion and analysis of texts, followed by individually designed research, about several crucial issues:  What is humor and why do women in particular need it?  What is satire and how do we know good satire when we read or hear it? To what ends do women use irony, wit and satire? Our subjects of study will come from film, poetry, fiction, essays, and editorials.  Included on the syllabus are the Seneca Falls Declaration of 1848, Dorothy Parker’s stories, essays by Dorothy Allison and Katha Pollitt, and fiction by Flannery O’Connor, Sandra Cisneros, Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, and Nanci Kincaid.

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SPRING 2016

SUBJ CRS# SEC CRN COURSE TITLE DAYS TIME BLDG RM INSTRUCTOR MDE
HSP 124H 1M 9050 G. I. in Science M W F 9:15 - 10:20 Putnam 253 Dale Kennedy MMA
HSP 124H 2M 9434 G. I. in Science M W F 10:30 - 11:35 Observatory Doug White MMA
HSP 124H 3M 9435 G. I. in Science M W F 11:45 - 12:50 Palenske 225 David Seely MMA
HSP 131H 1T 9208 G. I. in Humanities M W F 1:00 - 2:05 Vulg 202 Kalen Oswald MTA
HSP 131H 2T 9221 G. I. in Humanities M W F 9:15 - 10:20 Vulg 202 Dan Mittag MTA
HSP 135H 2H 9077 G. I. in Humanities M T W F 11:45 - 12:35 Observatory Mark Bollman MHC
HSP 135H 1H 9227 G. I. in Humanities T  R 10:30 - 12:20 Vulgamore 301 Ron Mourad MHC
HSP 154H 1M 9188 G. I. in Social Science T  R 2:15 -  4:05   Norris 100 Greg Saltzman MMA
HSP 155H 1H 9353 G. I. in Social Science T  R 10:30 - 12:20  Robinson 403 Patrick McLean MHC
HSP 155H 2H 9436 G. I. in Social Science M W 2:15 - 4:05   Observatory Carrie Walling MHC
HSP 172H 1A 9425 G. I. in Fine Arts T  R 2:15 - 4:05 Observatory Maureen Balke MAC
HSP 172H 2A 9426 G. I. in Fine Arts M W F 2:15 - 3:20 Goodrich 145 Sam McIlhagga MAC
HSP 175H 2H 9431 G. I. in Fine Arts T  R 10:30 - 12:20 Goodrich 145 David Abbott MHC
HSP 175H 1H 9282 G. I. in Fine Arts M 2:15 - 5:00 Bohm Theatre
W 2:15 - 3:20 Rob 206 Geoff Cocks MHC
HSP 397H 1 9427 Thesis Develpmnt T 7:00-8:00 pm Observatory Dale Kennedy

 

Great Issues in Science - Animal Communication
HSP 124    CRN 9050       9:15 – 10:20 a.m.  Putnam 253
Observatory                     Instructor:  Dr. Dale Kennedy

In Animal Communication, we will start with the question, what is communication?   We will examine some of the diverse systems of communication among animals from an evolutionary perspective.  Animal communication involves a minimum of three components:  a signaler (sender), a signal, and a perceiver (receiver).  We will explore different types of signals in animal communication (including acoustic, visual, chemical, and tactile), and ask how environmental factors and other features, such as signal reliability and signal cost, affect signal selection in non-human species.   We will address a variety of other questions, including whether signals are honest and accurate from the perspective of the sender and the perceiver, whether signals work among different species (interspecific), and what (if anything) distinguishes non-human animal communication from human language.

This course fulfils the Modeling and Analysis mode. 

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 124H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Science - The Natural History of Love
HSP 124   CRN 9434    MWF 10:30 - 11:35 a.m.
Observatory                 Instructor:  Dr. Douglas White

Exploration of the nature and function of love in humans from the perspectives of evolutionary biology, ornithology, brain science, anthropology, psychology, mythology, and the arts.  What is love?  Why do we love?  How is love important? 

Love is virtually absent from Albion’s catalog.  Yet, love is a topic of deep and universal personal and societal interest.  Love is systemic to many and disparate academic disciplines.  And, Albion needs love to flourish.  Here, we break through obscuring jargon, silos, and silence, first by considering the breeding biology of birds.  Can we see love there in revealing variety?  We move on to examine how modern sciences of neurobiology, anthropology, and psychology are being used to characterize human love.  Do they have it right?  Do people and birds pick mates in similar ways?  Next, we will see if love, in its expansive sense, relates to the human subconscious as revealed by comparative mythology.  Where is your bliss?  Finally, we will test our biologically-informed models of love against meditations on love prized in drama and music.

This course fulfills the Modeling and Analysis mode.  It is not intended to address directly sex education, sexual politics, or gender issues. 

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 124H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Science  -  The Quantum Enigma
HSP 124H   CRN 9435         MWF 11:45 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Science Complex, T.B.A.     Instructor:  Dr. Dave Seely

One third of our nation's economy is based on products that were developed using quantum mechanics.  For eighty years quantum theory has been proven repeatedly and is arguably the most successful predictive theory in the history of science.  Unfortunately, no one really understands it and its deeper implications for our sense of what is physical reality.  In this course we discuss the nature and practice of modern science which leads to a study of the essential mysteries of the "quantum" world. We look at quantum mechanics in non-technical, but physically accurate, terms in an effort to explore the bizarre physical and philosophical implications of the fundamental quantum nature of the universe.

This course fulfills the Modeling and Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 124H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Humanities - Don Quijote of La Mancha
HSP 131H   CRN 9208     MWF 1:00 – 2:05 p.m.
Vulgamore 202                Instructor:  Dr. Kalen Oswald

“The best novel in history: 100 renown authors select ‘El Quijote’ in a survey conducted by the Nobel Institute.” 

Thus reads the title of a full page article in El País from Wednesday, May 8, 2002. Very few would argue that Miguel de Cervantes’s work El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha is a masterpiece  of world literature. Virtually everybody has heard of  Don Quijote and Sancho, and most have seen some representation of their (mis)adventures, be it the Broadway hit “Man of La Mancha,” the more contemporary made for TV movie starring Jon Lithgow, or Mr. Magoo’s Don Quixote. The verb  phrase “tilting windmills” and the adjective “quixotic” are found in English dictionaries.  Nevertheless, the fraternity of humankind that  has actually read the entire book cover-to-cover  is still relatively small. It is about time we make that fellowship a little larger. Reading and  analyzing this work—the first great modern novel —will be a challenging, but life changing experience.   His imagination became filled with a host of  fancies he had read in his books.”

This course fulfills the Textual Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 131H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.


Great Issues in Humanities  -  Religious Disagreements
HSP 131H   CRN 9221     MWF 9:15-10:20 a.m.
Vulgamore 202                Instructor:  Dr. Dan Mittag

With religious diversity comes religious disagreement. Christians, for example, believe in the existence of a personal God. Buddhists don’t. Some believe that salvation is only attainable through the death of Jesus Christ. All non-Christians deny this. These are deep disagreements (and especially important ones to the religious). What is the best way to understand and respond to them? Can more than one view be correct or epistemically reasonable? Given that we all know of this diversity in religious belief, and given that we know other reasonable people

disagree with us, how can we be rational in continuing to believe as we do? Does such awareness mean that we have an intellectual obligation to abandon our religious views? In this course we will explore such questions as we investigate religious diversity from an epistemological perspective.

This course fulfills the Textual Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 131H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Humanities  -  Perspectives on Gambling
HSP 135H   CRN 9077       MTWF 11:45 a.m. – 12:35 p.m.
Observatory                       Instructor:  Dr. Mark Bollman

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gambling, considering the topic from historical, philosophical, and mathematical perspectives for a balanced look at this multifaceted and increasingly important subject.  Evaluation will be based on 5-6 essays of varying lengths, computer laboratory work, and some mathematical exercises.  Students must be 18 years old no later than April 1, 2016.

Texts under consideration:
            History: Roll The Bones: The History of Gambling, David Schwartz
                        The Unfinished Game, Keith Devlin
            Mathematics: Practical Casino Math, Robert Hannum & Anthony Cabot
                                The Mathematics of Games and Gambling, Edward Packel
            Philosophy:   The Logic of Chance, John Venn
            Literature:    The Literary Companion to Gambling, Annabel Davis-Goff

This course fulfills the Historical and Cultural Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 135H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Humanities  -  Religion and Politics
HSP 135H   CRN  9227      TR 10:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.
Vulgamore Hall                  Instructor:  Dr. Ronney Mourad

This course will examine some of the institutional, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship between religion and politics.  In seeking to understand this relationship, we will draw on political theology, history, philosophy, and political science.  We will look at some classic Christian models for the relationship between church and state in their historical contexts, trace religious responses to the emergence of modern secularism, and examine some contemporary theological prescriptions regarding the role of religion in liberal democracies.  Class material will emphasize theoretical approaches to the topic, but student papers may apply these approaches to issues such as school prayer, the reference to God in the Pledge of Allegiance, or the display of religious symbols in government buildings.

This course fulfills the Historical and Cultural Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 135H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Social Science  -  Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
HSP 154H   CRN 9188         TR 2:15 – 4:05 PM
Norris 100                           Instructor:  Dr. Greg Saltzman    

This course will help you learn how to secure agreements between two or more interdependent parties in order to get things done.  It draws from theories and concepts related to negotiation developed in microeconomics (game theory, Pareto efficiency), psychology (cognitive biases), and labor relations (integrative bargaining).  Numerous role-playing exercises will enhance students' skills as negotiators, through repeated practice.  This course also should help students become more aware of their own ethical values and personality traits.

Who Should Take This Course? A course on negotiation and dispute resolution is especially important for students preparing for future roles as:
        Lawyers                                    Human Services Professionals
        Managers                                  Community Group Leaders
        Public officials                           Environmental Advocates 

The principles of negotiation learned from this course should be broadly applicable to many contexts, such as law, business, international relations, and public policy.  I do not, however, emphasize the kind of intensely emotional interpersonal negotiations that a marital therapist or family therapist might facilitate.

This course fulfills the Modeling and Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 154H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Social Science  -  Canada: More than Snow, Hockey & Maple Syrup"
HSP 155H   CRN 9353         TR 10:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.
Robinson Hall, T.B.A.           Instructor:  Dr. Patrick McLean

This course is designed to introduce students to Canada and Canadian society from a range of vantage points.  We will examine the history, culture, politics, society, literature, arts and the strong regional differences within the country to our north through readings, discussions, guest lectures, film and travel.  We also will examine the highly asymmetrical relationship between Canada and the United States and the influence each has on the other.

Canada offers a convenient lens through which to view our own country.  Canada’s history parallels that of the US at times, but represents a very different response to colonial rule.  Canada retains a strong set of regional identities, including a linguistic minority that influences every facet of the country’s history.  Canada has developed through its Canadian content laws a vibrant arts, culture and literary scene.  Canada has followed a less assimilationist approach toward immigrants, resulting in a “Vertical Mosaic” compared to the American Melting Pot.

This course fulfills the Historical and Cultural Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 155H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

 Great Issues in Social Science  -  The Politics of Genocide
HSP 155H   CRN 9436       MW 2:15 – 4:05pm
Observatory                      Instructor:  Dr. Carrie Walling

In this course students will examine genocide using historical, interpretive and comparative methods.  The course will focus principally on two genocides: the Holocaust and the Rwandan Genocide of 1994. We will use oral histories and written testimonies along with historical, political science and public policy texts, human rights reports, international law, and government documents.  We will examine the motives of perpetrators and the experiences of victims being attentive to the unique character of each genocide, as well as the similarities that exist between them.  Through our studies, we will confront extraordinary inhumanity by examining the causes of genocide and its methods of implementation but we will also learn about the strength of the human spirit by studying resistance, survival and rescue within the context of genocide. Students will have the opportunity to produce a major research report using oral testimony through the Shoah Digital Archives and other online sources. The course will include interaction with external speakers and a field trip to the Farmington Hills Holocaust Museum.  Students will be evaluated based on attendance and class participation, several short essays and a final research project using testimony.

This course fulfills the Historical and Cultural Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 155H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Fine Arts  -  “From the Ballroom to Hell” – Schubert’s Vienna ca. 1815
HSP 172H   CRN 9425          TR 2:15 – 4:05 p.m.
Observatory                         Instructor:  Dr. Maureen Balke

This course will look at Vienna around 1815—its background of Napoleonic war, politics, censorship, secret police, and rapidly changing society, as well as the diversions young people sought out to “escape” from unpleasant reality.  These diversions ranged from grand public spectacle (major concerts, opera, the theatre, grand balls, celebrity virtuosos) to the intimate salon and Schubertiade, held in private homes and including poetry, song, and tableaux.  

To counter the horrors and chaos of war and the battlefield (where men reigned), the ballroom in particular became the dominion of the ladies, including the development of elaborate rituals and games concerning costume, etiquette and dance.    In tandem with dramatic and rapid changes in dress from the French aristocratic model to the more free and form-revealing “Josephine” style, new and scandalous dances (such as the Waltz—but not at all the sedate version we know today!) developed.  Ballroom “games” for choosing one’s dance partner, including “The Mirror” and “Whips and Reins”, frequently resulted in embarrassment and great hilarity.   Secret messages could be sent to a lover through glove and handkerchief flirtations.  All these activities were a form of “escape” within “safe” societal boundaries.

This class will study the political, social, and musical context in which all these reactions to the times developed.  We will study the Congress of Vienna and read the diary of a Napoleonic footsoldier.  We will read etiquette and dance manuals from the period, and look at historical costume and hairstyles.  We will listen to music of Schubert and his contemporaries, and look at some of the poetry Schubert chose to set to music. 

We will present our findings in a combination Schubertiade/salon/ball in a public performance near the end of the semester.   The evening will contain music, historical skits, dance, costume, games, and all will participate/contribute, each according to interests and abilities.

You do NOT have to be a dancer, singer, actor, poet, or musician in order to contribute.  You do NOT have to be a historian or a political scientist.  But if you have special interest or ability in any of these areas, that contribution will be welcome!

This course fulfills the Artistic Creation and Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 172H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Fine Arts  -  Perspectives on Composer: Style and Expression in Music Composition
HSP 172H   CRN 9426           MWF 2:15 – 3:20 p.m.
Goodrich Chapel 145              Instructor:  Dr. Sam McIlhagga

This course will examine music composition through the lens of the composer, the performer, and the audience.  Further views by musicologists, philosophers, and psychologists will provide an interdisciplinary approach to the topic.  While music composition is the primary focus, relevant parallels in architecture, visual art, literature, and poetry will also be considered.  Historically established music traditions (e.g. concert music and jazz) are contrasted with new forms (e.g. techno, film music and rap) in search of the expanding role of music composition.  Course activities include artistic creation, readings, listening assignments, writing, concert attendance, field trips, class discussion, and presentations.

Student learning outcomes:
     Students will experience the compositional process first-hand through multiple composition projects on various topics.
     Students will prepare and perform select compositions from their portfolio of compositions in an end-of-semester recital.
     Students will accurately identify similarities and differences in musical genres, composers, compositions, and critical analyses through written assignments.

You DO NOT have to be a music major or play an instrument to take this class

This course fulfills the Artistic Creation and Analysis mode.Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 172H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Fine Arts  -  Music and the Holocaust
HSP 175H   CRN 9431          TR 10:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.
Goodrich Chapel 145             Instructor:  Dr. David Abbott

This class will explore the role of music of European music between 1925-50, a time of immense social, political and cultural turmoil.  Students will study and learn about the conditions and climate for artistic expression, including music composed under socialist patronage as well as a reaction or resistance to government and social repression.  This will include works created and performed in ghettos and concentration camps in situations of extreme impoverishment, cruelty and terror.  These activities constitute artistic attempts at survival, witness and resistance. 

Students will be exposed to music and in some cases art, that is, the cultural “artifacts” created in a place and time that is significantly removed from the experience of American students in 21st century.  After studying the circumstances of music composed and performed during the period of the holocaust, students will be directed to investigate and reflect on how people in the present day are continuing to be uprooted from their culture and environment and in many cases be faced with extinction.

This course fulfills the Historical and Cultural Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 175H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

Great Issues in Fine Arts  -  Kubrick
HSP 175H   CRN 9282           Monday 2:15 – 5:00 p.m., Bohm Theatre
                                            Wednesday 2:15 – 3:20 p.m., Robinson 206
Instructor:  Dr. Geoffrey Cocks

An intensive and critical study of the cinema of Stanley Kubrick in the context of twentieth-century Western history and culture.  Students will view all thirteen of Kubrick's feature films and read three of the novels on which Kubrick based screenplays.  Required readings include:  Cocks et al., Depth of Field; Nabokov, Lolita; Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Begley, Wartime Lies.

This course fulfills the Historical and Cultural Analysis mode.

Note:  If you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 175H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission from Dan Skean, Interim Director of Honors, before registration.

 

FALL 2015

CRS# SEC CRN COURSE TITLE DAYS TIME BLDG INSTRUCTOR
123 1S  8058 G.I. in Science M W  F   9:15 - 10:20 Putnam 253 V. McCaffrey
123L 1  8059 G.I. in Science LAB   2:15 -   4:35 Kresge 376 V. McCaffrey
124 1M  8257 G.I. in Science  MTWF 11:45 - 12:35 Palens 225 Mark Bollman
131 1T  8253 G. I. in Humanities M  W   2:15 - 4:05 Rob 403 Perry Myers
131 2T  8282 G. I. in Humanities T   R 10:30 - 12:20 Vulg 301 Judy Lockyer
154 1M  8188 G. I. in Social Science T  R   2:15 -   4:05 Norris 100 Greg Saltzman
151 1T  8430 G. I. in Social Science T  R   2:15 -   4:05 Observatory A. Grossman
155 1H  8116 G. I. in Social Science T  R 10:30 - 12:20 Observatory D. Chistopher
155 2H  8254 G. I. in Social Science M W F   2:15 -   3:20 Observatory Deborah Kanter
172 1A  8255 G.I in Fine Arts M W F 10:30 - 11:35 Goodrich 145 Sam Mcllhagga
172 2A  8256 G.I in Fine Arts M W F 10:30 - Noon Ceramic Annex Lynne Chytilo
172 3A 8488         G.I in Fine Arts T  R   2:15 - 4:05 Goodrich 145 L. Jensen-Abbott

 

Great Issues in Social Science

Black Swans and Everyday Life

HSP 155    CRN 8116     
Tuesday and Thursday     10:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m
Observatory
Dr. Drew Christopher

This seminar will examine how human beings typically process information about “black swans,” which are defined as events that are extremely rare, typically unpredictable, and have a visible, significant impact on everyday life. We will also discuss how human beings typically process information about “white swans,” which are defined as events that are common, predictable in the aggregate, and tend to have an unseen significant impact on everyday life. In this course, we will examine four historical events of a “black swan” nature: the rise of Nazi Germany during the 1920s and 1930s, the 9/11 attacks, Hurricane Katrina, and the Crash of 2008. In addition, we will examine at least one prospective black swan: the rise of the Islamic State and related extremist groups, and their potential impacts on American and global societies. We will also examine at least one issue of a “white swan” nature: drug abuse and addiction. Discussion will focus on the unfolding and aftermath of the black swan events, why experts tended to neglect the possibility of black swans, and how other supposed “experts” could explain them after they occurred. 

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP151 you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

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Great Issues in Social Science
Negotiation and Dispute Resolution

HSP 154    CRN 8188
Tuesday & Thursday     2:15 – 4:05 PM     Norris 100
Dr. Greg Saltzman                                                                           

Course Description

This course will help you learn how to secure agreements between two or more interdependent parties in order to get things done.  It draws from theories and concepts related to negotiation developed in microeconomics (game theory, Pareto efficiency), psychology (cognitive biases), and labor relations (integrative bargaining).  Numerous role-playing exercises will enhance students' skills as negotiators, through repeated practice.  This course also should help students become more aware of their own ethical values and personality traits.

Who Should Take This Course?
A course on negotiation and dispute resolution is especially important for students preparing for future roles as:

    - Lawyers
    - Managers
    - P
ublic officials
    - 
Human services professionals
    - Environmental advocates
    - Community group leaders

The principles of negotiation learned from this course should be broadly applicable to many contexts, such as law, business, international relations, and public policy.  I do not, however, emphasize the kind of intensely emotional interpersonal negotiations that a marital therapist or family therapist might facilitate.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP154 you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

----------

Great Issues in the Social Sciences:
“Savage ‘Little’ Wars: Narratives of Counterinsurgency Warfare in Film and in Practice 1963-2013 

HSP151       CRN 8430
Tuesday, Thursday     2:15pm – 4:05pm
Observatory
Dr. Andy Grossman 

This honors seminar is framed by a puzzle which is best considered as a question: How is it that a military strategy, “Counterinsurgency” (COIN) that has failed so often and so systematically can continue to be held in high regard by political and military elites in countries such as the United States?

In thinking about this question, we  will analyze how COIN has been viewed by national security and military elites (post-World War II generals in particular) as a long-term strategy to fight asymmetric wars:  that is, post-Colonial conflicts, conflicts that arise in “failed states,” and, finally, the  problematic “global war on terrorism”— i.e., the post 9/11 strategies for asymmetric war. 

We will take two approaches to the analysis in the seminar. 1). The consideration of how COIN tactics have been portrayed in film; that is, how narratives are used in film to establish a particular kind of thinking. 2). A careful and close reading of important academic literature in the national security, war-fighting, and policy history scholarship. This aspect to our seminar aims at a fuller understanding of how military strategy has adjusted to modern asymmetric warfare and why COIN regularly reemerges with a new gloss, as the “go to” tactic/strategy for countries such as the United States.

As regards the use of film, the seminar will examine how COIN has been portrayed  in popular film as a means to either support or raise questions about so-called “small wars” and the tactics associated with these types of conflicts. We will view films representing various points of view.   We will also consider questions about how the use of film narratives (drawing on the work of Hayden White and others) can reconstruct a particular context (opposing realities if you will) that lends support to counter-insurgency warfare or, undermines this strategy.

The second approach will be reading intensive referencing the literature on the military strategies of asymmetric warfare emphasizing the perspective of those on the “receiving end” as it were, of counter-insurgency operations.  I would like us to  focus specifically on why COIN tactics and strategies seem to continue to garner significant purchase among the military, even in light of its abject historical failure (save a few instances in modern history).  Why is this the case?  That is the what the seminar is about.

The course will entail both a close reading of two types of texts: film and literature. Short papers follow each film. One final paper for the course. 

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP151 , you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

----------

Great Issues in Social Science
After the Melting Pot: Issues in 20th-Century U.S. Immigration

HSP 155     CRN 8254
Monday, Wednesday, Friday     2:15 – 3:20pm
Observatory
Dr. Deborah Kanter

The role of immigrants in the U.S., a “nation of immigrants,” has been debated since the founding era. This seminar looks both at the experience and myths of immigration, as well as the debates over immigration’s place in the 20th-century U.S.

How has immigration changed since the arrival of the predominantly European “huddled masses” of a century ago?  Ellis Island holds a strong place in our national consciousness, but many American families first entered the U.S. in the past century at Angel Island, El Paso, JFK, or LAX. The U.S. population currently includes an all-time high number of foreign-born individuals, mostly from nations well beyond Europe: what does this hold for the future? How have attitudes toward immigration changed with the rise and fall of different notions of race?

The class will consider immigration through history, ethnography, demography, literature, film, and sociology. Amidst our general readings, the seminar will focus on three main immigrant groups: East European Jews, Mexicans, and South Asians. Students will have the opportunity to research other immigrant groups.

Readings (tenative list):
Ernesto Galarza, Barrio Boy
S. Mitra Kalita, Suburban Sahibs
Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake
Rubén Martínez, Crossing Over: a Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail
Israel Zangwill, “The Melting Pot”
Jane Ziegelman, 97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement

Films:
The Sixth Section
Hester Street
Today’s Special


Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP155, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration 

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Great Issues in Fine Arts

HSP 172     CRN 8488
Tuesday & Thursday
2:15 – 4:05pm
Dr. Lia Jensen-Abbott

This class will explore the relevance of all the arts in society, culture, and education.  As a microcosm of trends nationwide, the course will assess Albion's lack of funding for arts programs and perhaps try to come up with some ideas for this community.  The course will have three components:  1. individual exploration of students’ own needs, appreciation, etc. for the arts;  2. We will read/research aesthetic philosophy/theory as well as some statistical research and analysis, and bring in speakers.  The final component will involve working in this community—the class will brainstorm a project with the ultimate goal of putting into place some new arts initiative.  We may travel to see plays, museums, music performances, etc., along with speakers.  The course will involve different types of writing—journals, research based papers, and a final project.

Possible weekend class trip to Chicago or Detroit DIA to get some direct experience of the things we will be covering in class --- visit to the art museum, etc….

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP172, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 ---------------------------------

Great Issues Issues in Fine Arts
Ceramics and the Industrial Revolution

HSP 172   CRN 8256
Monday, Wednesday, Friday     10:30 - Noon
Ceramics Annex
Lynne Chytilo

Ceramics and the Industrial Revolution is an interdisciplinary course that engages students in producing handmade pottery while tracing the history and commerce of the ceramics industry from pre-industrial times to the 1920s. Students will learn to make and fire clay objects in the studio, starting with hand forming techniques and later using plaster molds, while taking part in discussions from readings about how the industrial revolution changed many aspects of the world. Each student will find a research topic related to cultural changes during the Industrial Revolution and present their findings to the class. Emphasis will be placed on student-facilitated learning, exploration, discovery, and collaborative processes.

NO CERAMICS EXPERIENCE NEEDED

 Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP172 you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

----------

Great Issues in Fine Arts
Perspectives on Composer:  Style and Expression in Music Composition

CRN 8255
Monday, Wednesday & Friday     10:30-11:35am
Goodrich 145
Sam McIlhagga

Course Description:
This course will examine music composition through the lens of the composer, the performer, and the audience.  Further views by musicologists, philosophers, and psychologists will provide an interdisciplinary approach to the topic.  While music composition is the primary focus, relevant parallels in architecture, visual art, literature, and poetry will also be considered.  Historically established music traditions (e.g. concert music and jazz) are contrasted with new forms (e.g. techno, film music and rap) in search of the expanding role of music composition.  Course activities include artistic creation, readings, listening assignments, writing, concert attendance, field trips, class discussion, and presentations.

You DO NOT have to be a music major or play an instrument to take this class

 Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP172H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration. 

 ----------

Great Issues in Humanities
Working in America:  Perspectives from the Humanities

HSP 131   CRN 8282
Tuesday & Thursday     10:30 – 12:20pm
Vulgamore 301
Judith Lockyer

Americans are among the hardest workers in the world.  Our identities are in large part defined by the work that we do.  You are now academic workers who are preparing for many professions and for full, active citizenship.  We know that from our work comes, of course, money, but usually also our sense of self worth. We also know that work and socio/economic class are not regarded by all as equally “important.” Many of us do not have a full or even accurate knowledge of the working conditions of many people, the tensions between labor and management, poverty, and the class system in this country. This seminar offers an opportunity to learn more about the complexities of working in America. We will read, discuss, and write about essays, fiction, drama and film, poetry, and autobiography, each of which will increase our understanding of work in America.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP131, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

----------

Great Issues in Humanities
Science and the Soul: Science, Religiion & Literature in Germany After Darwin

HSP 131    CRN 8253
Monday & Wednesday     2:15 – 4:05pm
Robinson 403
Dr. Perry Myers 

Description: Since the German Enlightenment changes in the way we understand human life and how we evaluate that knowledge have created a breach in “empirical” views of human kind and “religious” modes of assessing the human being and human behavior. This course will explore, through secondary and original texts, how science has confronted traditional religious views of human beings, and literary portrayals of these conflicts that arose. By combining historical texts, scientific and literary texts in excerpt, we will seek a more in-depth look at how the conflicts between science and religion have been negotiated in Germany throughout the nineteenth century and up to World War II. The course is designed specifically for the student interested in the history of science, the history of religious thought or literature. The student will learn 1) how science and religion come into conflict in modern times; 2) how to approach interdisciplinary reading in cultural history, science, theology and philosophy; 3) and how literature interprets the conflicts between science and religion. No prior knowledge of these areas is necessary.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP131, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

----------

G.I. in Science
The Nobel Prize in the Sciences

HSP 123 & 123L     CRN 8058    CRN Lab 8059
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:15 – 10:20 - Discussion
Monday 1:00 – 4:35 - Lab 
Putnam 253 & Kresge 376
Dr. Vanessa McCaffrey

Course Description:
Every October, the world (or at least me!!) waits with bated breath for the announcement of the Nobel Prizes. The award goes to “those who had done their best to benefit mankind in the fields of physics, chemistry, medicine, literature and peace.” (Nobel Website) In this class, we will be studying the legacy of Alfred Nobel and how it has impacted science and the world at large. We will be learning about Alfred Nobel and what lead him to establish this lasting award. We will be looking at several of the awards in great detail to understand the science behind the award and their benefits. I would also like to explore several controversies that surround the Nobel Prize, including Gender and Race in laureate selection, why certain fields were chosen to have awards, while others were not (Math and Biology for example) and what happens when the Swedish Academy of Sciences may have made an flawed selections.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP123, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 ----------

Great Issues in Science
8 Big Ideas That Shaped Science

HSP 124   CRN 8257
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday     11:45 – 12:35
Palenske 225
Dr. Mark Bollman

This course will examine eight major scientific ideas, each one of which has had a revolutionary impact on a particular area of science.

Astronomy: Big Bang theory
Biochemistry: DNA structure
Biology: Evolution
Chemistry: Periodic Law
Computer science: Information theory
Geology: Plate tectonics
Mathematics: Non-Euclidean geometry
Physics: Atomic structure

In several cases, students will read the original papers that reported the discovery. Laboratory work with Geometer’s Sketchpad will be used to explore the world of hyperbolic geometry.  Evaluation will be based on a sequence of short papers, a collection of laboratory reports from Sketchpad, and a substantial final project.

The reading list will include:
        The Discoveries, Lightman
        The Canon, Angier         
        A Well-Ordered Thing, Gordin
        The Non-Euclidean Revolution, Trudeau
        The Double Helix, Watson     
        The Origin Of Species, Darwin
        Fortune’s Formula, Poundstone
        Plate Tectonics, Orestes

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP124, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SPRING 2015

HSP SEC CRN COURSE TITLE DAYS TIME BLDG INSTRUCTOR
124 1M 7107 G.I. in Science M W F 10:30 - 11:35 Norris 104 Nicolle Zellner
124 2M 7412 G.I. in Science M T W F 11:45 - 12:35 Obsveratory Mark Bollman
131 1T 7171 G. I. in Humanities M W F   1:00 - 2:05 Observatory Kalen Oswald
135 1H 7202 G. I. in Humanities M W     2:15 -   4:05 Vulg 302 Sally Jordan
131 3T 7201 G. I. in Humanities T  R 10:30 - 12:20 Vulg 302 Mary Collar
135 2H 7414 G. I. in Humanities M W F   1:00 -  2:05 Vulg 301 Jeremy Kirby
155 1H 7413 G. I. in Social Science T  R 10:30 - 12:20 Rob 206 Trisha Franzen
154 1M 7422 G. I. in Social Science T  R   2:15 -  4:05 Olin 230 Suellyn Henke
175 1H 7274 G.I in Fine Arts   2:15 - 5:00 Film Ferg 111 Geoff Cocks
W   2:15 - 3:20 Ferg 111 Geoff Cocks
172 1A 7428 G.I in Fine Arts T  R   2:15 - 4:05 Obsveratory Lia Jensen-Abbott
397 1 7415 Thesis Development  T  7:00 - 8:00pm Observatory Dale Kennedy

 

 

Great Issues in Science - 8 Big Ideas That Shaped Science –Dr. Mark Bollman
HSP 124   CRN 7412  Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday  11:45 – 12:35
This course will examine eight major scientific ideas, each one of which has had a revolutionary impact on a particular area of science.

 

Astronomy: Big Bang theory
Biochemistry: DNA structure
Biology: Evolution
Chemistry: Periodic Law
Computer science: Information theory
Geology: Plate tectonics
Mathematics: Non-Euclidean geometry
Physics: Atomic structure

 

In several cases, students will read the original papers that reported the discovery. Laboratory work with Geometer’s Sketchpad will be used to explore the world of hyperbolic geometry.  Evaluation will be based on a sequence of short papers, a collection of laboratory reports from Sketchpad, and a substantial final project.

 

The reading list will include:
        The Discoveries, Lightman
        The Canon, Angier                    
        A Well-Ordered Thing, Gordin
        The Non-Euclidean Revolution, Trudeau
        The Double Helix, Watson                     
        The Origin Of Species, Darwin
        Fortune’s Formula, Poundstone
        Plate Tectonics, Orestes


GREAT ISSUES IN SCIENCE - ORIGINS: A COSMIC PERSPECTIVE – Dr. Nicole Zellner
HSP 124    CRN 7107    Monday, Wednesday, Friday    10:30 – 11:35am

 

This multidisciplinary course covers topics in physics, astronomy, chemistry, earth sciences, and biology to understand the origin of life.  We will review relevant concepts and discuss current issues from a "cosmic" perspective.  No specialized prior knowledge of these topics is assumed.

 

One of the fundamental goals in all of science is to understand the origin of life. This course will review relevant concepts and discuss current issues from a "cosmic" perspective. The importance of this approach is demonstrated by recent research, such as astronomical observations that show that organic molecules are synthesized in the interstellar clouds from which new planetary systems are born;

 

         analyses of meteorites that fell to Earth that show that they contain amino acids and other biologically relevant molecules of extraterrestrial origin;

 

         experiments in prebiotic chemistry that show that important prebiotic molecules may not have been produced in sufficient quantities here on Earth at the time of life's origin; and

 

         the knowledge that many other stars have planetary systems and the upcoming technology to test whether or not they support life.

 

Throughout this course, we will read relevant articles and discuss them from a scientific perspective.  Several published results about the existence of first life on Earth, for example, are highly controversial: the ‘lunar cataclysm’ hypothesis that suggests first life was wiped out multiple times before it became established; the conflict between a ‘hot’ or ‘cool’ origin of life; and the ongoing dialogue about whether or not carbon isotope signatures at ~3.8 Ga are truly biogenic, to name a few.  These ideas, among others, will be discussed and students will be able to draw their own conclusions about how and when life started on Earth. 

Once we have established a model for life based on necessary ingredients and conditions, we will begin to speculate about the possibility for the existence of life on other planets in our own Solar System, as well as the possibility for life in other star systems.  One such predictor is the Drake Equation, which uses a variety of parameters to ascertain the number of civilized (i.e. communicating) civilizations that may exist in our Milky Way Galaxy.  We will also talk about how extrasolar planets are detected and the best ways to predict their masses, compositions, water content, and temperature.  Finally, we will discuss various NASA and ESA missions that are currently designed to look for biosignatures on distant planets.


Great Issues in Fine Arts – KUBRICK – Dr. Geoffrey Cocks
HSP 175   CRN 7274    Mondays   2:15 – 5:00   Wednesdays 2:15 – 3:20pm 

 

An intensive and critical study of the cinema of Stanley Kubrick in the context of twentieth-century Western history and culture.  Students will view all thirteen of Kubrick's feature films and read three of the novels on which Kubrick based screenplays.  Required readings include:  Cocks et al, Depth of Field; Nabokov, Lolita; Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Begley, Wartime Lies.

 

 

Great Issues in Fine Arts – Dr. Lia Jensen Abbott
HSP 172     CRN 7428          Tuesday & Thursday            2:15 – 4:05pm

 

This class will explore the relevance of all the arts in society, culture, and education.  As a microcosm of trends nationwide, the course will assess Albion's lack of funding for arts programs and perhaps try to come up with some ideas for this community.  The course will have three components:  1. individual exploration of students’ own needs, appreciation, etc. for the arts;  2. We will read/research aesthetic philosophy/theory as well as some statistical research and analysis, and bring in speakers.  The final component will involve working in this community—the class will brainstorm a project with the ultimate goal of putting into place some new arts initiative.  We may travel to see plays, museums, music performances, etc., along with speakers.  The course will involve different types of writing—journals, research based papers, and a final project.

 

 

Great Issues in Humanities - Mystery, Manners, Modernisms and me – Dr. Mary Collar
HSP 131    CRN  7201          Tuesday  -  Thursday            10:30 – 12:20

 

This course examines the response of thinkers, many of them literary artists, to the death of god, the idea that Nietzsche put at the center of thought for himself and for many of the moderns.   Even writers not directly influenced by Nietzsche have been haunted by the implications of such a philosophical orientation and have asked to what extent a death-of-God stance would necessarily reorient the artistic gaze away from Truth and towards the social good.    At mid-century, the American writer Flannery O'Connor uses the terms Mystery and Manners to designate these two realms; near the century’s end, the Indian writer Salman Rushdie contends that the conflict between the sacred and the secular poses the central aesthetic question for any modern writer.  Also in this late modern period, some thinkers use Nietzsche to undermine fundamental conceptions of human identify.  The goal of this HSP course is to expose and explore these tensions among competing and often contradictory visions, to provoke in students intelligent reflection upon some great issues surrounding truth, goodness, and beauty. 

 

 

Great Issues in Humanities - The Literature of Horror – Dr. Sally Jordan
HSP 135   CRN 7202                        Monday & Wednesday         2:15 – 4:05pm

 

 Course Description:
In this class, we will read and analyze horror fiction from the late-eighteenth century through the mid-twentieth century.  One issue we will examine closely is the connection between horror literature and social history.  For instance, the genre which inaugurated the literature of horror, the gothic novel, arose in England during the late eighteenth century.  Is it merely a coincidence that this genre exploded in popularity just as England was struggling with a major societal unraveling?  How did the real-life fears of riot and revolution intersect with the invented fears of crumbling castles and ghostly apparitions? 

 

Other questions we will consider include the making of monsters: from what or whom does a culture shape its monsters?  Why?  What is the function of monsters within the larger culture?  Is monster-making a way to police social norms, or does it allow a space for the forbidden to flourish and the repressed to return?  We will also study theories of the sublime to begin thinking about the aesthetics of horror.

 

The course work will include reading, discussion, written assignments, and research projects.  The texts we will read include the first gothic novel, Horace Walpole’s bizarre Castle of Otranto; another gothic work by the most popular writer of her day, Anne Radcliffe; Mary Shelley’s story of science gone wrong, Frankenstein; several stories by the ever-morbid Edgar Allen Poe; Sheridan Le Fanu’s intriguing tale of a female vampire, Carmilla; Robert Louis Steven’s meditation on the monster within, The Strange Case of Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde; Bram Stocker’s tale of the fearsome foreigner, Dracula; Henry James’s uncanny story about possibly possessed children, The Turn of the Screw; some of H.P. Lovecraft’s deeply disturbing short stories; and Shirley Jackson’s comic yet creepy novel The Haunting of Hill House.

 

 

Great Issues in Humanities - Creationism and its Critics: Syllabus – Dr. Jeremy Kirby
HSP 135              CRN 7414             Monday, Wednesday, Friday           Time: 1:00 - 2:05pm

Description:  Herein we place the argument from design—the argument that concludes that the world’s structure can only be adequately explained with appeal to an intelligent designer—on trial.  For the Defense: Socrates, Plato, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Augustine, William Paley, Michael Behe, Phillip Johnson, and Alvin Plantinga.  For the Prosecution: Epicurus, David Hume, Charles Darwin, Robert Pennock, Michael Ruse, Daniel Dennett, and Eliot Sober.  

 

 

 

 Great Issues in Humanities - Don Quijota of La Mancha – Dr. Kalen Oswald
HSP 131    CRN 7171           Monday, Wednesday, Friday           1:00 – 2:05

 

“The best novel in history: 100 renown authors select ‘El Quijote’  in a survey conducted by the Nobel Institute.”  Thus reads the title of a full page article in El País from Wednesday, May 8, 2002. Very few would argue that Miguel de Cervantes’s work El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha is a masterpiece of world literature. Virtually everybody has heard of Don Quijote and Sancho, and most have seen some representation of their (mis)adventures, be it the Broadway hit “Man of La Mancha,” the more contemporary made for TV movie starring Jon Lithgow, or Mr. Magoo’s Don Quixote. The verb  phrase “tilting windmills” and the adjective “quixotic” are found in English dictionaries.  Nevertheless, the fraternity of humankind that has actually read the entire book cover-to-cover  is still relatively small. It is about time we make that fellowship a little larger. Reading and analyzing this work—the first great modern novel —will be a challenging, but life changing experience.  

 

Great Issues in Social Science - FOOD STORIES, FOOD STUDIES – Dr. Trisha Franzen
HSP 155     CRN  7413                     Tuesday – Thursday             10:30 – 12:20

 

Heirloom tomatoes, Oaxacan-style cheese, Japanese sushi, from the local food movement through the benefits and problems of globalized food systems, how do we decide what to eat?  In the last fifteen years, food has become a central cultural issue in the United States.  While food writing has existed for centuries, if not millennium, for most of that time scribes have documented the culinary experiences of a society’s elite.  Today we not only have a greater variety of media through which to learn about foods, but scholars, researchers, practitioners, and artists from all disciplines within the academy and many positions outside academia are reconsidering the importance of everyday food traditions.  Students in this class will step into the world of food writing, food films and food studies. Each regional study will include historical, cultural, and intersectional (gender, race/ethnicity, class and sexuality) analyses.


Great Issues in Social Science - SCHOOLS, INDIVIDUALS & SOCIETY – Dr. Suellyn Henke
HSP 154    CRN 7422                       Tuesday – Thursday             2:15 – 4:05pm

What is the relationship between schools, the individual, and society? What is the purpose of schooling? Do schools serve as sites of social reproduction, maintaining the status quo, or do they have transformative potential? Should the focus of schooling be to re-invent society or to preserve it? In the course Radical Teaching and Normative Realities of Schooling: What are the Possibilities students will explore different models of schooling and analyze and discuss the assumptions/features embedded within each model. We will begin with the Plato’s allegory of the “cave” and discuss differing views about nature of knowledge and purposes and aims of education. This discussion will continue through an examination of divergent school models (pre-school, elementary, secondary, adult) such as Waldorf, Montessori, The Highlander Folk School, Summerhill Free School, Harvey Milk High School, Mexican American Studies program at Tucson High School, and Pre-Schools in Three Cultures -Japan, China and U.S.   Critical pedagogy, an international and interdisciplinary constellation of theoretical perspectives that raise questions about the relationship of schooling and capitalism, gender, race, sexuality, language, and literacy, will be used as analytical tool to explore implications (e.g., power, ethical, cultural) of each model. As a final project students will identify and analyze a contemporary educational model or topic and present to a public audience. 

 

 

 HSP SEC           CRN       COURSE TITLE DAYS TIME BLDG INSTRUCTOR
123 1S 2308       G.I. in Science M W F 11:45 - 12:35 Olin 230 Jeff Wilson
123L 1 2309            LAB for CRN 2308 R   9:15 - 11:05 Olin 234 Jeff Wilson
124 1M 2310       G.I. in Science M W F 10:30 - 11:35am Observatory Nicole Zellner
123 2S 2483       G.I. in Science M W F 10:30 - 12:20 Observatory Vanessa McCaffrey
123L 2 2484            LAB for CRN 2483 W   2:15 -   4:30pm Vanessa McCaffrey
135 1H 2463       G. I. in Humanities M T W F 11:45 - 12:35 Observatory Mark Bollman
131 1T 2485       G. I. in Humanities M W F   1:00 -   2:05 Observatory Jess Roberts
135 3H 2486       G. I. in Humanities M W F   2:15 -   4:05 Vulg 301  Sally Jordan
155 1H 2311       G. I. in Social Science M W F 9:15 - 10:20am Observatory Deborah Kanter
151 1T 2312       G. I. in Social Science T  R   2:15 - 4:05pm Observatory Andy Grossman
155 2H 2464       G. I. in Social Science T  R 10:30 - 12:20pm Vulg 102 Carrie Walling
172 1A 2313       G.I in Fine Arts M  W   2:15 - 4:05pm Observatory Maureen Balke
172 2A 2500       G.I in Fine Arts T  R   2:15 - 4:05pm Bobbitt 202 Amy Rahn
397 1 2314       Thesis Development  T   7:00 - 8:00pm OBSERV Kennedy

 

 

Great Issues in Science - ORIGINS: A COSMIC PERSPECTIVE - Dr. Nicolle Zellner

This multidisciplinary course covers topics in physics, astronomy, chemistry, earth sciences, and biology to understand the origin of life.  We will review relevant concepts and discuss current issues from a "cosmic" perspective.  No specialized prior knowledge of these topics is assumed. 

One of the fundamental goals in all of science is to understand the origin of life. This course will review relevant concepts and discuss current issues from a "cosmic" perspective. The importance of this approach is demonstrated by recent research, such as  

  • astronomical observations that show that organic molecules are synthesized in the interstellar clouds from which new planetary systems are born;
  • analyses of meteorites that fell to Earth that show that they contain amino acids and other biologically relevant molecules of extraterrestrial origin;
  • experiments in prebiotic chemistry that show that important prebiotic molecules may not have been produced in sufficient quantities here on Earth at the time of life's origin; and
  • the knowledge that many other stars have planetary systems and the upcoming technology to test whether or not they support life.

Throughout this course, we will read relevant articles and discuss them from a scientific perspective.  Several published results about the existence of first life on Earth, for example, are highly controversial: the ‘lunar cataclysm’ hypothesis that suggests first life was wiped out multiple times before it became established; the conflict between a ‘hot’ or ‘cool’ origin of life; and the ongoing dialogue about whether or not carbon isotope signatures at ~3.8 Ga are truly biogenic, to name a few.  These ideas, among others, will be discussed and students will be able to draw their own conclusions about how and when life started on Earth. 

Once we have established a model for life based on necessary ingredients and conditions, we will begin to speculate about the possibility for the existence of life on other planets in our own Solar System, as well as the possibility for life in other star systems.  One such predictor is the Drake Equation, which uses a variety of parameters to ascertain the number of civilized (i.e. communicating) civilizations that may exist in our Milky Way Galaxy.  We will also talk about how extrasolar planets are detected and the best ways to predict their masses, compositions, water content, and temperature.  Finally, we will discuss various NASA and ESA missions that are currently designed to look for biosignatures on distant planets.

Great Issues in Science - NEUROPHYSIOLOGY FOR BEGINNERS - Dr. W. Jeff Wilson 

Everything that you do, feel, think, perceive… basically everything that matters to you… is the result of activity in your nervous system.  Individual cells called “neurons” communicate with one another to create your mind.  In “Neurophysiology for Beginners” we will learn about the activity of neurons: how they work, how they encode sensory information, how they control movement, perhaps how they produce emotions and mental activity.  The course will provide an overview of the history of our understanding of neurons, and will include many experiments and/or demonstrations that illustrate the concepts that we address.  You will also gain a basic understanding of simple instrumentation used to study the nervous system.  Because neurons are comparable across species, we can learn about your neurons by studying the neurons of simpler organisms like invertebrates; many of the lab experiences will focus on neurophysiology in cockroaches and earthworms, but we will also at times examine the neurons of students. 

A specific lab period is scheduled, but lecture time will also be devoted on occasion to laboratory-related experiences and discussion.  Students will be expected to maintain a lab notebook in which they record methodology and observations of each lab.  Students will also write up three of the labs (literature review, methodology, results, and discussion) according to APA style – these write-ups will be graded.  Finally, each student will design an individual experiment that extends one of the studies that we conducted in lab, ideally providing information about some as yet unanswered question in the literature.

Learning outcomes: By the end of the course students will be able to:
    Describe in detail the function of a neuron
    Describe the process by which neural activity is measured
    Explain how the nervous system encodes information about sensory stimuli
    Explain how electrical signals can cause muscles to move
    Explain how electrical signals can be used to examine sensory processing though the human nervous system
    Propose and conduct a well-controlled experiment addressing some feature of  neural activity and
    If all goes very well, propose an answer to the fundamental question of how neurons create mind.

Great Issues in Science - THE NOBEL PRIZE IN THE SCIENCES - Dr. Vanessa McCaffrey

Every October, the world (or at least me!!) waits with bated breath for the announcement of the Nobel Prizes. The award goes to “those who had done their best to benefit mankind in the fields of physics, chemistry, medicine, literature and peace.” (Nobel Website) In this class, we will be studying the legacy of Alfred Nobel and how it has impacted science and the world at large. We will be learning about Alfred Nobel and what lead him to establish this lasting award. We will be looking at several of the awards in great detail to understand the science behind the award and their benefits. I would also like to explore several controversies that surround the Nobel Prize, including Gender and Race in laureate selection, why certain fields were chosen to have awards, while others were not (Math and Biology for example) and what happens when the Swedish Academy of Sciences may have made an flawed selections.

 Great Issues In Humanities -  PERSPECTIVES ON GAMBLING - Dr. Mark Bollman

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gambling, considering the topic from historical, philosophical, and mathematical perspectives for a balanced look at this multifaceted and increasingly important subject.  Evaluation will be based on 5-6 essays of varying lengths, computer laboratory work, and some mathematical exercises.  Students must be 18 years old no later than November 1, 2014.

Great Issues in Humanities - THE LITERATURE OF HORROR - Dr. Sally Jordan

In this class, we will read and analyze horror fiction from the late-eighteenth century through the mid-twentieth century.  One issue we will examine closely is the connection between horror literature and social history.  For instance, the genre which inaugurated the literature of horror, the gothic novel, arose in England during the late eighteenth century.  Is it merely a coincidence that this genre exploded in popularity just as England was struggling with a major societal unraveling?  How did the real-life fears of riot and revolution intersect with the invented fears of crumbling castles and ghostly apparitions? 

Other questions we will consider include the making of monsters: from what or whom does a culture shape its monsters?  Why?  What is the function of monsters within the larger culture?  Is monster-making a way to police social norms, or does it allow a space for the forbidden to flourish and the repressed to return?  We will also study theories of the sublime to begin thinking about the aesthetics of horror.

The course work will include reading, discussion, written assignments, and research projects.  The texts we will read include the first gothic novel, Horace Walpole’s bizarre Castle of Otranto; another gothic work by the most popular writer of her day, Anne Radcliffe; Mary Shelley’s story of science gone wrong, Frankenstein; several stories by the ever-morbid Edgar Allen Poe; Sheridan Le Fanu’s intriguing tale of a female vampire, Carmilla; Robert Louis Steven’s meditation on the monster within, The Strange Case of Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde; Bram Stocker’s tale of the fearsome foreigner, Dracula; Henry James’s uncanny story about possibly possessed children, The Turn of the Screw; some of H.P. Lovecraft’s deeply disturbing short stories; and Shirley Jackson’s comic yet creepy novel The Haunting of Hill House.

Great Issues in HumanitiesMOBY DICK - Dr. Jess Roberts

In this course, we will set about the ambitious project of coming to understand the sense and nonsense, the portentousness and power, the history and wonder of what is arguably the most important novel ever written by an American—Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. Class discussions as well as formal and informal writing will provide opportunities for us to discover what the novel has to teach us about language, form, history, intertextuality, truth, fate, our selves, and, yes, whales. Because coming to understand one text is always a matter of coming to understand many texts, we will also read and discuss some of Melville’s sources (the Bible and Macbeth, among others) as well as later revisions of his novel (such as Wes Anderson’s The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou).

Course Goals. By the end of this course students will…

  1. have grappled with the form and content of what is arguably the most important novel ever composed by an American
  2. have come to a fuller understanding of the legacy of Melville’s work and what accounts for that legacy
  3. understand the nature of intertexutality and how it can help us generate increasing nuanced ideas about literary works and about ourselves
  4. be able to generate and explain insights regarding a piece of literature in compelling, cogently written, and logically sound literary analysis
  5. be able to recognize the difference between paraphrasing, summarizing, and analyzing
  6. be able to perform textual analysis; that is, identify the meaning(s) of a text and the strategies through which it creates that/those meaning(s)
  7. be able to engage in a reasoned exchange—that is, to articulate their own ideas clearly and logically, to listen attentively to others as they do so, to seek out the strengths and weaknesses in their classmates’ logic and their own, to ask real questions, and to emerge from an exchange not necessarily in agreement with the other person/people but with a better understanding of their classmates’ idea and their own
  8. be able to cite literary works according to the MLA format

 

Great Issues in the Social Sciences -  DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION - Dr. Carrie Booth-Walling

In 1942 only twelve countries in the world could call themselves democracies. Less than 70 years later, there are 117 electoral democracies globally. Democracies continue to emerge, elections continue to be held, and popular decision-making continues to take root. This is staggering given the challenges that we face globally today: religious extremism, political violence and terrorism, global poverty, conflict, war, devastating natural disasters, global health challenges such as HIV/AIDS, and increased strain upon the environment, to name only a few.

Despite this hopeful news, challenges remain for those countries undergoing democratic transitions. These new democracies are all but stable, their transitions far from certain. Even our own stable and prosperous democracy, often fails to live up to the ideals of popular sovereignty, transparency, accountability, and checks upon state power.  This is a class about democratization—in short, how countries become, and how they stay, democratic. We will examine the meaning and importance of democratic institutions, the ways in which democratic transitions emerge, and the challenges in “consolidating” democratic transitions—in short, ensuring that democracy (rather than violence, authoritarianism, or military rule) becomes “the only game in town.”

We will examine case studies of democratization from various regions of the world in order to better understand the causes of democratic transition and democracy’s consolidation.  We will focus on the third wave of democracy that swept large parts of Europe and Latin America beginning in the 1970s and we will explore the Arab Spring and prospects for democracy in the newly transitioning countries of the Middle East.  Each student will write a final paper examining the democratic transition of their choice.  This will introduce students to cultural and historical experiences different than their own and will also help them to make sense of the democratization process that is currently underway in parts of the Middle East – their own historical moment in time.  As the introduction above suggests, this class could not be more important and timely. I want to welcome you all to this course and I look forward to a challenging, exciting, and fun semester!

Great Issues in the Social Sciences - Dr. Andy Grossman
               “SAVAGE ‘LITTLE’ WARS: Narratives of  Counterinsurgency Warfare in Film and in Practice 1963-2013”

This honors seminar is framed by a puzzle which is best considered as a question: How is it that a military strategy, “Counterinsurgency” (COIN) that has failed so often and so systematically can continue to be held in high regard by political and military elites in countries such as the United States?

In thinking about this question, we  will analyze how COIN has been viewed by national security and military elites (post-World War II generals in particular) as a long-term strategy to fight asymmetric wars:  that is, post-Colonial conflicts, conflicts that arise in “failed states,” and, finally, the  problematic “global war on terrorism”— i.e., the post 9/11 strategies for asymmetric war. 

We will take two approaches to the analysis in the seminar. 1). The consideration of how COIN tactics have been portrayed in film; that is, how narratives are used in film to establish a particular kind of thinking. 2). A careful and close reading of important academic literature in the national security, war-fighting, and policy history scholarship. This aspect to our seminar aims at a fuller understanding of how military strategy has adjusted to modern asymmetric warfare and why COIN regularly reemerges with a new gloss, as the “go to” tactic/strategy for countries such as the United States.

As regards the use of film, the seminar will examine how COIN has been portrayed  in popular film as a means to either support or raise questions about so-called “small wars” and the tactics associated with these types of conflicts. We will view films representing various points of view.   We will also consider questions about how the use of film narratives (drawing on the work of Hayden White and others) can reconstruct a particular context (opposing realities if you will) that lends support to counter-insurgency warfare or, undermines this strategy.

The second approach will be reading intensive referencing the literature on the military strategies of asymmetric warfare emphasizing the perspective of those on the “receiving end” as it were, of counter-insurgency operations.  I would like us to  focus specifically on why COIN tactics and strategies seem to continue to garner significant purchase among the military, even in light of its abject historical failure (save a few instances in modern history).  Why is this the case?  That is the what the seminar is about.

Great Issues in Social Science - Dr. Deborah Kanter
                         AFTER THE MELTING POT: ISSUES IN 20th-CENTURY U.S. IMMIGRATION 

The role of immigrants in the U.S., a “nation of immigrants,” has been debated since the founding era. This seminar looks both at the experience and myths of immigration, as well as the debates over immigration’s place in the 20th-century U.S.

How has immigration changed since the arrival of the predominantly European “huddled masses” of a century ago?  Ellis Island holds a strong place in our national consciousness, but many American families first entered the U.S. in the past century at Angel Island, El Paso, JFK, or LAX. The U.S. population currently includes an all-time high number of foreign-born individuals, mostly from nations well beyond Europe: what does this hold for the future? How have attitudes toward immigration changed with the rise and fall of different notions of race?

The class will consider immigration through history, ethnography, demography, literature, film, and sociology. Amidst our general readings, the seminar will focus on three main immigrant groups: East European Jews, Mexicans, and South Asians. Students will have the opportunity to research other immigrant groups.

 

Great Issues in Fine Arts - Dr. Maureen Balke
                          “FROM THE BALLROOM TO HELL” – SCHUBERT'S VIENNA ca. 1815 

This course will look at Vienna around 1815—its background of Napoleonic war, politics, censorship, secret police, and rapidly changing society, as well as the diversions young people sought out to “escape” from unpleasant reality. 

These diversions ranged from grand public spectacle (major concerts, opera, the theatre, grand balls, celebrity virtuosos) to the intimate salon and Schubertiade, held in private homes and including poetry, song, and tableaux.   

To counter the horrors and chaos of war and the battlefield (where men reigned), the ballroom in particular became the dominion of the ladies, including the development of elaborate rituals and games concerning costume, etiquette and dance.    In tandem with dramatic and rapid changes in dress from the French aristocratic model to the more free and form-revealing “Josephine” style, new and scandalous dances (such as the Waltz—but not at all the sedate version we know today!) developed.  Ballroom “games” for choosing one’s dance partner, including “The Mirror” and “Whips and Reins”, frequently resulted in embarrassment and great hilarity.   Secret messages could be sent to a lover through glove and handkerchief flirtations.  All these activities were a form of “escape” within “safe” societal boundaries.

This class will study the political, social, and musical context in which all these reactions to the times developed.  We will study the Congress of Vienna and read the diary of a Napoleonic footsoldier.  We will read etiquette and dance manuals from the period, and look at historical costume and hairstyles.  We will listen to music of Schubert and his contemporaries, and look at some of the poetry Schubert chose to set to music. 

We will present our findings in a combination Schubertiade/salon/ball in a public performance near the end of the semester.   The evening will contain music, historical skits, dance, costume, games, and all will participate/contribute, each according to interests and abilities.

You do NOT have to be a dancer, singer, actor, poet, or musician in order to contribute.  You do NOT have to be a historian or a political scientist.  But if you have special interest or ability in any of these areas, that contribution will be welcome!

 Great Issues in Fine Arts - THINKING AS DRAWING/THINKING ABOUT DRAWING - Dr. Amy Rahn

Drawing is an art form that reaches back to the earliest human civilizations, yet it continues to be relevant for contemporary artists working today. How can we understand the continued relevance of drawing as an artistic practice?  Starting with Milton Glaser’s assertion that “thinking is drawing,” this class will combine the practice of drawing with class discussions of readings on the history and practice of drawing. Thus, in its subject and structure, the course will combine dawing practice and analysis in a discussion-based seminar. Readings will range from artists’ writings on drawing to critical and art historical analyses of drawings, investigating drawing as both a mode of cultural production and a form of thought. 

Students who complete this course will be able to:
• Experience drawing as both a practice and a mode of inquiry
• Understand key artworks in their historical and cultural contexts
• Gain experience reading and interpreting art history
• Identify and analyze artists’ drawing practices, and interpret writings associated with drawings

 

SPRING 2014

CRS# CRN COURSE TITLE DAYS TIME BLDG INSTRUCTOR
123 5141 G.I. in Science M W F 11:45 - 12:35 Olin 230 Jeff Wilson
123L 5142  LAB for 5141 TH   9:15 - 11:05 Olin 234 Jeff Wilson
124 5459 G.I. in Science M W F   9:15 - 10:20 Putnam 253 Dale Kennedy
131 5251 G. I. in Humanities M  W   2:15 - 3:55 Observatory Dan Mittag
132 5249 G. I. in Humanities M  W   2:15 - 3:55 Rob 403 Helena Mesa
154 5177 G. I. in Social Science T  TH   2:15 - 4:05 Norris 100 Saltzman
155 5427 G. I. in Social Science M  W   7:00 - 9:00pm Observatory Chris Hagerman
172 5403 G.I in Fine Arts T  TH   2:15 - 4:05 Observatory Maureen Balke
172 5458 G.I in Fine Arts M W F 11:45 - 12:50 Bobbitt Bille Wickre
397 5306 Thesis Development  T   7:00 - 8:00pm OBSERV Kennedy

 

NEUROPHYSIOLOGY FOR BEGINNERS
HSP 123     CRN  5141 / Lab CRN 5142
Monday, Wednesday, Friday = 11:45 – 12:35  Olin 230
Thursday LAB = 9:15 – 11:05am  Olin 234
Dr. Jeff Wilson

Everything that you do, feel, think, perceive… basically everything that matters to you… is the result of activity in your nervous system.  Individual cells called “neurons” communicate with one another to create your mind.  In “Neurophysiology for Beginners” we will learn about the activity of neurons: how they work, how they encode sensory information, how they control movement, perhaps how they produce emotions and mental activity.  The course will provide an overview of the history of our understanding of neurons, and will include many experiments and/or demonstrations that illustrate the concepts that we address.  You will also gain a basic understanding of simple instrumentation used to study the nervous system.  Because neurons are comparable across species, we can learn about your neurons by studying the neurons of simpler organisms like invertebrates; many of the lab experiences will focus on neurophysiology in cockroaches and earthworms, but we will also at times examine the neurons of students. 

A specific lab period is scheduled, but lecture time will also be devoted on occasion to laboratory-related experiences and discussion.  Students will be expected to maintain a lab notebook in which they record methodology and observations of each lab.  Students will also write up three of the labs (literature review, methodology, results, and discussion) according to APA style – these write-ups will be graded.  Finally, each student will design an individual experiment that extends one of the studies that we conducted in lab, ideally providing information about some as yet unanswered question in the literature.

Learning outcomes: By the end of the course students will be able to:

      Describe in detail the function of a neuron,
      Describe the process by which neural activity is measured,
      Explain how the nervous system encodes information about sensory stimuli,
      Explain how electrical signals can cause muscles to move,
      Explain how electrical signals can be used to examine sensory processing though the human nervous system,
      Propose and conduct a well-controlled experiment addressing some feature of  neural activity, and
      If all goes very well, propose an answer to the fundamental question of how neurons create mind.

Reading assignments will be drawn from the primary literature on the function of the nervous system

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP123, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration Great Issues in Fine Arts

 

ANIMAL COMMUNICATION
HSP 124   CRN 5459
Monday, Wednesday, Friday   9:15 – 10:20am
Putnam 253
Instructor: Dale Kennedy

Course Description:

In Animal Communication, we will start with the question, what is communication?   We will examine some of the diverse systems of communication among animals from an evolutionary perspective.  Animal communication involves a minimum of three components:  a signaler (sender), a signal, and a perceiver (receiver).  We will explore different types of signals in animal communication (including acoustic, visual, chemical, and tactile), and ask how environmental factors and other features, such as signal reliability and signal cost, affect signal selection in non-human species.   We will address a variety of other questions, including whether signals are honest and accurate from the perspective of the sender and the perceiver, whether signals work among different species (interspecific), and what (if anything) distinguishes non-human animal communication from human language. 

 

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP124, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 

THE NATURE OF RATIONALITY
HSP 131   CRN 5251
Monday and Wednesday  2:15 – 4:05pm
Dr. Dan Mittag
Observatory

Course Description :

Results in empirical psychology show that often we do not reason in conformance with the laws of probability and the laws of logic. If these divergences are due to our underlying reasoning competence, then one might wonder whether we are rational creatures, after all, since we reflexively think of rationality as being defined exactly in terms of these laws. Is it right, then, to question our rationality on the basis of these empirical results? How exactly do they bear on the status of our rationality? Can we learn anything about the nature of rationality by considering them? In this course we will explore such questions as we investigate the psychology of human reasoning and the nature of rationality.

A course packet, available for purchase in the philosophy department (Vulgamore 207).

Course Objectives:

     * To understand the psychological experiments central to the “heuristics and biases” literature, as well as the interpretive
        controversies that surround them.
     * To explore some philosophical issues relating to this literature.  
     * To better understand the nature of (theoretical) rationality.
     * To think and write carefully, clearly, and to the point.

Short Papers – 30%      Presentation – 15%     Final Paper – 35%      Participation – 20%

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP131, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 

POETIC FORMS AND TRADITIONS
HSP 132H   CRN 5249
Mondays and Wednesdays 2:15-4:05pm
Helena Mesa, English

Poet Charles Simic writes, “Poems witness our existence in ways nothing else can.  There’s that moment in a great poem when time stops and the reader’s self is touched by someone else’s life.  The poem ascends, and so do we in its company.  In a long history of forgetting, poems make us remember what it means to stand naked before ourselves.”  But how do we go about writing poems that metaphorically stop time, poems that emotionally touch the reader, or poems that unexpectedly ascend? 

As an introduction to poetic forms and traditions, this course provides guidance, feedback, and practice on the craft of writing poetry.  Throughout the semester, we will approach poetry from a writer’s perspective, analyzing how writers craft their poems, and each discussion will serve as a model for students to write their own poems.  We will study both traditional and contemporary readings, examining the writers’ techniques and styles; that is, we will investigate various traditional subjects (such as ekphrasis, dramatic monologues, elegies, and poetry of witness) in addition to various traditional forms (potentially sonnets, villanelles, heroic couplets, and blues poems).  Furthermore, we will consider not only the tradition of a poetic form (subject, structure, expectations), but contemporary uses and adaptations of the form.  And in the process of exploring poetic forms and traditions, we will also discuss what elements make a poem a great poem—imagery, narrative, lines, line breaks, music, etcetera.

Thus, the main concentration of our class will consist of three major components: reading and analyzing published poems;  writing, revising, and editing; and learning to critique fellow student work.  We will workshop several of each poet’s poems, offering constructive criticism and due praise, which the poet will revise for one portfolio and one reinventions project. Since the workshop’s usefulness depends on student ideas and suggestions, everyone will participate in class and individually respond to fellow writers’ work.  Lastly, students will present one poetic tradition or form to the class.

One does not need to be a poet to take this course—the course is designed so that every writer will learn about poetic craft, and so that every writer will develop over the course of the semester.

 Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP132, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration



NEGOTIATION AND DISPUTE RESOLUTION
HSP 154H    CRN 5177
Tuesday & Thursday   2:15 – 4:05
Dr. Gregg Saltzman
Norris 100

 Course Description

This course will help you learn how to secure agreements between two or more interdependent parties in order to get things done.  It draws from theories and concepts related to negotiation developed in microeconomics (game theory, Pareto efficiency), psychology (cognitive biases), and labor relations (integrative bargaining).  Numerous role-playing exercises will enhance students' skills as negotiators, through repeated practice.  This course also should help students become more aware of their own ethical values and personality traits.

Who Should Take This Course?

A course on negotiation and dispute resolution is especially important for students preparing for future roles as:
        Lawyers
        Managers
        Public officials
        Human services professionals
        Environmental advocates
        Community group leader 

The principles of negotiation learned from this course should be broadly applicable to many contexts, such as law, business, international relations, and public policy.  I do not, however, emphasize the kind of intensely emotional interpersonal negotiations that a marital therapist or family therapist might facilitate.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 154H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration.


WE ARE MAKING A NEW WORLD
HSP 155H   CRN 5427
Monday & Wednesday
7:00-9:00pm
Dr. Chris Hagerman

Course Description:

The Great War did not inaugurate trench warfare, but it brought to such fighting an unheralded degree of industrial intensity.  The inevitable corollary of this evolution toward perfection was a four-year spasm of destruction, unprecedented in severity and scale - one that visited unspeakable horrors upon millions of soldiers.  None emerged unchanged. Taking as its focus the three great traumas of trench warfare manifest on the Western Front – the destruction of human life, of civilization, and of the environment - this course explores the Great War’s impact on individual soldiers and, through them, culture at large.  Our approach will be interdisciplinary, encompassing detailed studies of the physical environment, traditional historical documents such as, diaries, letters, memoirs, and trench maps, photographs, film, poetry, painting, novels, and music. 

European Trip*:  (Not mandatory but highly recommended)

We will leave on or about May 12th and return on or about May 19th, 2014.   Our aim will be to experience and discuss the Great War battlefields, museums, and memorials of Ypres (Belgium) and the Somme (France).  In Europe we will be travelling point to point in vans, but will otherwise be on foot most of the time. 

Estimated cost per student:  $1,800, (excluding transfers to and from DTW and spending money)

 

 Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP 155H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration.

 

“FROM THE BALLROOM TO HELL” – Schubert’s Vienna ca. 1815
HSP 172   CRN 5403
Tuesday & Thursday  2:15 - 4:05pm
Observatory
Maureen Balke

This course will look at Vienna around 1815—its background of Napoleonic war, politics, censorship, secret police, and rapidly changing society, as well as the diversions young people sought out to “escape” from unpleasant reality. 

These diversions ranged from grand public spectacle (major concerts, opera, the theatre, grand balls, celebrity virtuosos) to the intimate salon and Schubertiade, held in private homes and including poetry, song, and tableaux.   

To counter the horrors and chaos of war and the battlefield (where men reigned), the ballroom in particular became the dominion of the ladies, including the development of elaborate rituals and games concerning costume, etiquette and dance.    In tandem with dramatic and rapid changes in dress from the French aristocratic model to the more free and form-revealing “Josephine” style, new and scandalous dances (such as the Waltz—but not at all the sedate version we know today!) developed.  Ballroom “games” for choosing one’s dance partner, including “The Mirror” and “Whips and Reins”, frequently resulted in embarrassment and great hilarity.   Secret messages could be sent to a lover through glove and handkerchief flirtations.  All these activities were a form of “escape” within “safe” societal boundaries.

This class will study the political, social, and musical context in which all these reactions to the times developed.  We will study the Congress of Vienna and read the diary of a Napoleonic footsoldier.  We will read etiquette and dance manuals from the period, and look at historical costume and hairstyles.  We will listen to music of Schubert and his contemporaries, and look at some of the poetry Schubert chose to set to music. 

We will present our findings in a combination Schubertiade/salon/ball in a public performance near the end of the semester.   The evening will contain music, historical skits, dance, costume, games, and all will participate/contribute, each according to interests and abilities.

You do NOT have to be a dancer, singer, actor, poet, or musician in order to contribute.  You do NOT have to be a historian or a political scientist.  But if you have special interest or ability in any of these areas, that contribution will be welcome!

 Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP172H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration


“ARTISTS AND WATER”
HSP 172    CRN 5458
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
11:45 – 12:50
Dr. Bille Wickre

Course Description:

    This course will explore the ways that artists respond to the worsening world water crisis in conceptual and visual ways.  In 2007 the United Nations Environment Program predicted that: “If present trends continue, 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity by 2025, and two-thirds of the world population could be subject to water stress.” Artists from around the world are creating art that calls attention to or illustrates the crisis, or actually remediates polluted water.  Rather than being grim or depressing, many of the works are beautiful and poetic.

 

FOLD, FAN, AND FOLIOS:  Books as Art
HSP 172    CRN 5471
Monday/Wednesday 2:15 – 4:05pm
Anne McCauley

Students in this course will learn to make historical book forms from various cultures (Coptic, codex, accordion, and Japanese bound) and discover an appreciation of books in a new and wider context.   From there, students will apply newly learned techniques to the production of nontraditional artist books.

In creating your original work, whether text, imagery, or a combination of the two is employed, emphasis will be placed on the creation of books as visual objects. 

No art making experience required.  Class size is limited to 10 students.  Fulfills Artistic Creation Mode.

 

 

 

*FALL 2013 SCHEDULE*

CRS#    CRN      COURSE/TITLE             DAYS                 TIME                  BLDG                  INSTRUCTOR

124       4452     G. I. in Science               T R                    2:15 -  4:05          Observatory           Dale Kennedy

123       4430     G. I. in Science               M W F             11:45 - 12:35         Olin 230                Jeff Wilson

123L     4431     G. I. in Sci LAB               R                       9:15 - 11:05         Olin 234                Jeff Wilson

124       4450     G. I. in Science               M T W TH          1:00 -   1:50         Observatory          Mark Bollman

131       4211     G. I in Humanities           M W  R             1:00 -    2:05         Vulg 201               Mary Collar

131       4212     G. I in Humanities           T  R                 10:30 -  12:20        Vulg 202                Judy Lockyer

155       4432     G. I. in Social Science     M W                10:30 -  12:20        Putnam 253          Trisha Franzen

11:45 -  11:00        Observatory          Debraa Kanter

151       4433     G. I. in Social Science     T  R                 10:30 -  12:20        Observatory          Andy Grossman

172       4451     G. I. in Fine Arts             M W F             10:30 - 11:35         Observatory          Sam Mcllhagga

175       4434     G.I. in Fine Arts              M W                   2:15 -  4:05         Observatory          Clayton Parr

397       4435     Thesis Development        T                        7:00 -  8:00         Observatory          Dale Kennedy

 

Neurophysiology for Beginners HSP 123
CRN 4430 & 4431
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:45 – 12:35
Thursday LAB = 9:15 – 11:05am Dr. Jeff Wilson

Everything that you do, feel, think, perceive… basically everything that matters to you… is the result of activity in your nervous system.  Individual cells called “neurons” communicate with one another to create your mind.  In “Neurophysiology for Beginners” we will learn about the activity of neurons: how they work, how they encode sensory information, how they control movement, perhaps how they produce emotions and mental activity.  The course will provide an overview of the history of our understanding of neurons, and will include many experiments and/or demonstrations that illustrate the concepts that we address.  You will also gain a basic understanding of simple instrumentation used to study the nervous system.  Because neurons are comparable across species, we can learn about your neurons by studying the neurons of simpler organisms like invertebrates; many of the lab experiences will focus on neurophysiology in cockroaches and earthworms, but we will also at times examine the neurons of students.  A specific lab period is scheduled, but lecture time will also be devoted on occasion to laboratory-related experiences and discussion.  Students will be expected to maintain a lab notebook in which they record methodology and observations of each lab.  Students will also write up three of the labs (literature review, methodology, results, and discussion) according to APA style – these write-ups will be graded.  Finally, each student will design an individual experiment that extends one of the studies that we conducted in lab, ideally providing information about some as yet unanswered question in the literature. Learning outcomes: By the end of the course students will be able to: - Describe in detail the function of a neuron, - Describe the process by which neural activity is measured, - Explain how the nervous system encodes information about sensory stimuli, - Explain how electrical signals can cause muscles to move, - Explain how electrical signals can be used to examine sensory processing though the human nervous system, - Propose and conduct a well-controlled experiment addressing some feature of  neural activity, and - If all goes very well, propose an answer to the fundamental question of how neurons create mind.

Reading assignments will be drawn from the primary literature on the function of the nervous system

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP123, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration  

 

Animal Communication
HSP 124H   CRN 4452
Tuesday, Thursday   2:15 – 4:05pm
Observatory
Instructor: Dale Kennedy   

Course Description:

In Animal Communication, we will start with the question, what is communication?   We will examine some of the diverse systems of communication among animals from an evolutionary perspective.  Animal communication involves a minimum of three components:  a signaler (sender), a signal, and a perceiver (receiver).  We will explore different types of signals in animal communication (including acoustic, visual, chemical, and tactile), and ask how environmental factors and other features, such as signal reliability and signal cost, affect signal selection in non-human species.   We will address a variety of other questions, including whether signals are honest and accurate from the perspective of the sender and the perceiver, whether signals work among different species (interspecific), and what (if anything) distinguishes non-human animal communication from human language. 

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP124, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 

8 Big Ideas That Shaped Science
HSP 124   CRN  4450
1:00 – 1:50pm Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
Observatory
Dr. Mark Bollman

This course will examine eight major scientific ideas, each one of which has had a revolutionary impact on a particular area of science.

Astronomy: Big Bang theory Biochemistry: DNA structure Biology: Evolution Chemistry: Periodic Law Computer science: Information theory Geology: Plate tectonics Mathematics: Non-Euclidean geometry Physics: Atomic structure

In several cases, students will read the original papers that reported the discovery. Laboratory work with Geometer’s Sketchpad will be used to explore the world of hyperbolic geometry.  Evaluation will be based on a sequence of short papers, a collection of laboratory reports from Sketchpad, and a substantial final project.

The reading list will include:  The Discoveries, Lightman, The Canon, Angier, A Well-Ordered Thing, Gordin The Non-Euclidean Revolution, Trudeau, The Double Helix, Watson, The Origin Of Species, Darwin, Fortune’s Formula, Poundstone, Plate Tectonics, Orestes

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP124, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

The Literature of Equality:  Truth, Lies, and Ambiguity
HSP 131    CRN  4212
Tuesday, Thursday 10:30 – 12:20
Dr. Judy Lockyer

One of the most compelling ideas in Western culture is that people are or should be equal before the law and in each other’s eyes.  In this seminar we will look to literature, philosophy, and public documents to find the complex of beliefs and assumptions that make equality still just out of reach and often ambiguous.  We begin with Shakespeare’s final play, The Tempest and Aimé Césaire’s revisionist play, Une Tempête to learn from one early source about the complexities of equality.  All of our reading offer specific and varied perspectives on power and equality; each text enriches and complicates ideas we generally believe are true and stable facts. Our reading will include The Declaration of independence and the Declaration of Sentiments, Seneca Falls; and Ralph Ellison’s classic novel Invisible Man and Paul Beatty’s comic response White Boy Shuffle.  All papers will require approaches to textual analysis.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP131, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration  

 

Mystery, Manners, Modernisms and Me
HSP 131    CRN  4211
Monday, Wednesday , Thursday 1:00 - 2:05pm
Dr. Mary Collar

This course examines the response of thinkers, many of them literary artists, to the death of god, the idea that Nietzsche put at the center of thought for himself and for many of the moderns.   Even writers not directly influenced by Nietzsche have been haunted by the implications of such a philosophical orientation and have asked to what extent a death-of-God stance would necessarily reorient the artistic gaze away from Truth and towards the social good.    At mid-century, the American writer Flannery O'Connor uses the terms Mystery and Manners to designate these two realms; near the century’s end, the Indian writer Salman Rushdie contends that the conflict between the sacred and the secular poses the central aesthetic question for any modern writer.  Also in this late modern period, some thinkers use Nietzsche to undermine fundamental conceptions of human identify.  The goal of this HSP course is to expose and explore these tensions among competing and often contradictory visions, to provoke in students intelligent reflection upon some great issues surrounding truth, goodness, and beauty. 

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP131H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission of Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration  

 

Women, the Environment and Sustainability
HSP 155    CRN  4432
Monday, Wednesday 10:30-12:20
Dr. Trisha Franzen

Rachel Carson, Vandana Shiva, and Wangari Maathai head the list of women thinkers, writers and activists who have given us fresh views on the environment and sustainability. Starting with the works of these women and recognizing that the United States and other western countries have no monopoly on with environmental theory or activism, students will explore the breadth of global and local women’s work on all the issues relevant to sustainability. While the general public doesn’t often see the environment as a women’s issue, women’s ecofeminism developed with the contemporary women’s movement. In addition to reading, class discussions and short papers, students will conduct original research on an individual woman or women’s group. From that research, students will teach a section of the class and write a significant paper. Students will participate in Albion College’s Year of Sustainability events and develop a related class project. Outcomes: • Teach students to think critically about the connections between women’s issues and the environment; • Examine how place influenced the particular paths  of the three key women theorists and activists; • Consider the basic concepts, frameworks and debates concerning gender and the environment; • Explore how women’s studies and feminism have contributed to ecological and environmental theory;  • Foster creative thinking and original research on global and local efforts by women ion these issues; and • Link this class with the campus-wide sustainability theme. Process: Students will • Participate in and lead class discussions; • Write short reflection papers; • Conduct original research; • Teach a class based on that research; • Develop a group project related to Albion College’s Year of Sustainability

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP155, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 

After the Melting Pot: Issues in 20th-Century U.S. Immigration
HSP 155     CRN 4278
Monday , Wednesday, Friday 11:45 – 12:50pm
Dr. Deborah Kanter

The role of immigrants in the U.S., a “nation of immigrants,” has been debated since the founding era. This seminar looks both at the experience and myths of immigration, as well as the debates over immigration’s place in the 20th-century U.S.

How has immigration changed since the arrival of the predominantly European “huddled masses” of a century ago?  Ellis Island holds a strong place in our national consciousness, but many American families first entered the U.S. in the past century at Angel Island, El Paso, JFK, or LAX. The U.S. population currently includes an all-time high number of foreign-born individuals, mostly from nations well beyond Europe: what does this hold for the future? How have attitudes toward immigration changed with the rise and fall of different notions of race?

The class will consider immigration through history, ethnography, demography, literature, film, and sociology. Amidst our general readings, the seminar will focus on three main immigrant groups: East European Jews, Mexicans, and South Asians. Students will have the opportunity to research other immigrant groups.

Readings (tenative list): Israel Zangwill, “The Melting Pot” Ernesto Galarza, Barrio Boy Rubén Martínez, Crossing Over: a Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake Vijay Prashad, The Karma of Brown Folk Jane Ziegelman, 97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement

Films: The Sixth Section Hester Street

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP155, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 

“Savage ‘Little’ Wars: Narratives of  Counterinsurgency Warfare in Film and in Practice 1963-2013”
HSP 151    CRN  4453
Tuesday, Thursday 10:30 – 12:30
Dr. Andy Grossman

This honors seminar is framed by a puzzle which is best considered as a question: How is it that a military strategy, “Counterinsurgency” (COIN) that has failed so often and so systematically can continue to be held in high regard by political and military elites in countries such as the United States?   In thinking about this question, we  will analyze how COIN has been viewed by national security and military elites (post-World War II generals in particular) as a long-term strategy to fight asymmetric wars:  that is, post-Colonial conflicts, conflicts that arise in “failed states,” and, finally, the  problematic “global war on terrorism”— i.e., the post 9/11 strategies for asymmetric war. 

We will take two approaches to the analysis in the seminar. 1). The consideration of how COIN tactics have been portrayed in in film, specifically how narratives are used in film to establish a particular kind of thinking. 2). A careful and close reading of important academic literature in the national security, war-fighting, and policy history scholarship. This aspect to our seminar aims at a fuller understanding of how military strategy has adjusted to modern asymmetric warfare and why COIN regularly reemerges with a new gloss, as the “go to” tactic/strategy for countries such as the United States.

As regards the use of film, the seminar will examine how COIN has been portrayed  in popular film as means to either support or raise questions about small wars and the tactic of COIN.   Films representing both points of view will be used.   We will consider questions about how the use of film narratives (drawing on the work of Hayden White and others) can reconstruct a particular context (a reality if you will) that lends support or undermines COIN.

With respect to the second approach, we will read the literature on military strategy, consider the  issue from perspective of war-fighting, from the perspective of regular soldiers, and from the perspective of those on the “receiving end” as it were, of COIN.  I would like us to  focus specifically on why COIN tactics and strategies seem to continue to garner significant purchase among the military, even in light of its abject historical failure (save a few instances in modern history).  Why is this the case?  That is the what the seminar is about.

Preliminary: Films and  Books Films: The Battle of Algiers, Restrepo, Go Tell the Spartans, Full Metal Jacket, Walking with Bashir, The Lemon Tree Books: Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians, Orwell, Animal Farm, Orwell,  Collection of Essays, West,   The Village, Miller,  Tiger the Lurp Dog, Junger, War, US Marine Corp,  Small Wars Manual

The course will entail both a close reading of two types of texts: film and literature. Short papers follow each film. One final paper for the course. 

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP151 , you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 

Historic Parallels in the Arts
HSP 175   CRN  4434
Monday & Wednesday 2:15 – 4:05pm
Clayton Parr Music Department  (; (224)436-0415

The course will examine a number of points in European cultural history and look at how changing aesthetic ideals were manifested in music, painting and architecture.  Students will gain a basic historical familiarity with the important movements in Western artistic thought while developing the ability to compare examples of these ideas in different artistic genres.

Possible weekend class trip to Chicago for students to get some direct experience of the things we will be covering in class --- visit to the art museum, an architectural walking tour, the Frank Lloyd Wright house in Oak Park, take in a concert.

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP172, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

 

Perspectives on Composer: Style and Expression in Music Composition
HSP172H CRN 4451
Monday, Wednesday & Friday   10:30-11:35am
Sam McIlhagga

Course Description: This course will examine music composition through the lens of the composer, the performer, and the audience.  Further views by musicologists, philosophers, and psychologists will provide an interdisciplinary approach to the topic.  While music composition is the primary focus, relevant parallels in architecture, visual art, literature, and poetry will also be considered.  Historically established music traditions (e.g. concert music and jazz) are contrasted with new forms (e.g. techno, film music and rap) in search of the expanding role of music composition.  Course activities include artistic creation, readings, listening assignments, writing, concert attendance, field trips, class discussion, and presentations.

Student learning outcomes: -Students will experience the compositional process first-hand through multiple composition projects on various topics -Students will prepare and perform select compositions from their portfolio of compositions in an end-of-semester recital -Students will accurately identify similarities and differences in musical genres, composers, compositions, and critical analyses through written assignments

You DO NOT have to be a music major or play an instrument to take this class

Note:  if you have taken or now are taking a section of HSP172H, you may not take this course unless you have written permission by Dale Kennedy, Director of Honors, before registration

Andrew Kercher

kercherandrew3

Hometown/High School: Port Huron, MI; Port Huron Northern High School

Majors/Minors/Institutes: History and Philosophy Majors; Ford Institute

Campus Organizations: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia music fraternity, Nwagni Project

Why I Chose Ford: Ford allowed me to stay involved with my love for politics without having to devote so much time and classes to being a fully fledged Poli Sci major. It allowed me to be involved in the community and provided many opportunities and connections I would never otherwise had.

Internship: Historic Interpreter, Mackinac State Historic Parks

Post Grad Plans: I plan on going to grad school for museum studies, and I ultimately wish to stay employed in the museum field.

Albion College Student Farm

The mission of the Albion College Student Farm Association is to cultivate a student-organized, all-natural, sustainable, and aesthetically pleasing produce garden for the benefit of students and faculty from all academic disciplines and community members of all ages.

Using a combination of fields, a hoop house, and Three Sisters plots, the student farm grows a variety of peppers, tomatoes, green beens, onions, squash, corn, beets, and herbs at its location in the Whitehouse Nature Center

The goals of the student farm include:

  • Promote gardening as an uplifting, healthful, environmentally-friendly activity
  • Experiment with organic gardening practices such as composting and planting heirloom seeds
  • Raise awareness about the role of a local diet in reducing carbon footprint by offering our produce to Dining Services, student apartments, and annexes
  • Help ensure equal access to nutritious food in the Albion community by donating produce to local charities
  • Encourage Albion residents, especially youth, to learn about and appreciate organic gardening, become more connected with their local food system, and grow a deeper sense of community.

A group of five students started the farm during Albion’s Year of Sustainability in 2010.

Student Workers

The farm is a three way collaboration among Albion College's Center for Sustainability and the Environment, the Whitehouse Nature Center, and an independent student organization.

The work in the student farm is all volunteer during the school year. In the summer, the Center for Sustainability employs two interns to work half time at the farm, with the Nature Center employing them the other half of their time. 

Gardens and Hoop House

The The 1,440-square-foot growhouse is a "greenhouse on wheels." The hoop house was made possible by a generous gift from the Baird family in honor of Jessica Baird’s, ’11, graduation. Jessie was one of the founding members of the student organization. The Student Senate has also supported the student organization generously over the years.

In the hoop house, student farmers grow tomatoes and a variety of peppers. Outside the hoop house, students manage Three Sisters plots (corn, beans, and squash), as well as:

  • Winter squash
  • Watermelons
  • Various herbs, including basil, parsley, oregano, mints
  • Onions 
  • Summer squash
  • Green beans

How To Help

You can get involved with Albion's student farm by volunteering with the Student Farm Association, or apply to work at the student farm during the summer. Contact CSE Director Tim Lincoln for details. 

The student farm needs help with:

  • Weeding
  • Composting
  • Planting and cultivating crops

 

Samantha Stanek, '13

Samantha StanekCurrent LocationUniversity of Michigan-Flint Physical Therapy School in Flint, MI

Current Occupation: 3rd year PT student

In a nutshell, what do you do? 

I am in my final year of physical therapy school. I am currently finishing up my didactic course work, and I start three 10-week clinical rotations in the fall. During these clinical rotations, I will gain experience in orthopedics, pediatrics, and inpatient rehabilitation.

How did Albion's Healthcare Institute help you get there?

Albion's Healthcare Institute helped open my eyes to other healthcare professions that I hadn’t had much exposure to prior to college. The institute provided me with the resources to help get me into physical therapy school, and assisted me with observation sites to obtain the required volunteer hours to apply to PT school. I was also provided with resources to assist in studying for the GRE.

What's your best Albion College memory? 

I have too many great memories at Albion. My best memories include spending time with my friends on the weekends, going to La Casa, and dancing with the Albion College Dance Team during half time of the basketball games.

What's the benefit of having a healthcare institute like Albion's?

The benefit of being a part a healthcare institute like Albion’s is the guidance that you receive along the way. My intended major and ideas for career choices changed many times at the beginning of my Albion education. I was able to talk about it with someone who could provide me with more information on each career and help find the best fit for me. The institute provides an individualized plan for each member to help them best succeed in whatever they may want to pursue.

Brandon Lebioda, '18, Talks Clinical Job Shadowing

Brandon Lebioda, '18Major: Biology

Hometown: Romeo, Michigan

What was your summer experience like?

My summer experience consisted of a total of 40 hours shadowing in clinical settings. It started with Dr. Michael Williams, who is a family doctor for Prism Medical Group. He was my contact that helped me set up with other doctors in the Macomb area. I ended up shadowing seven different doctors from all ranges of practice. I had the pleasure of observing many different types of physician work, which ranges from watching multiple surgeries in Troy Beaumont's operating rooms to being with doctors in family practices. Every physician or surgeon that I shadowed had something else to bring to the table, and every new place I went felt like a new adventure in the world of healthcare.

What do you love about being in Albion's Healthcare Institute?

I love Albion's Healthcare Institute because of their effort. Dr. Barbara Keyes was the person who set me up with Dr. Williams, and I believe that without her none of my experience could have been possible. The Healthcare Institute goes to great lengths to prepare students for the next step toward their career goals, whether that is some sort of specialty school, or jobs within healthcare. This institute provides hands-on help to educate and help students toward their goals.

How do you think your experience will help you in your career goals?

I believe this summer experience helped me gain crucial knowledge of different healthcare careers while also giving me a sense of direction when it comes to choosing the career that suites my interests the best. Watching these different physicians, and learning about their backgrounds, allowed me to see how many different paths there are to become a kind and caring physician, who works hard to improve the lives of their patients.

What do you love about Albion College?

I love Albion College because of it's family atmosphere. The College as a whole, not only the Institute of Healthcare, does a great job of preparing students for their next step. The smaller numbers allow coaches, professors, advisors, and other faculty members to create relationships with students that other universities cannot compete with.

Tracks

Tracks are one way Ford students can grow within a specific interest area. No additional for-credit course work is required.

Ford staff members consult students within each track and jointly decide on speakers, short courses, field trips, panel presentations and other means of expanding students’ skills in the chosen track. Through affiliations with outside businesses, organizations and institutions, students are placed in internships and volunteerships that provide hands-on knowledge.

Current tracks available to Ford students:

  • Campaigns and Elections
  • Foreign Policy and Human Rights
  • Non-Profits and Foundations
  • Pre-Law
  • Science and Health Care
  • State and Local Government
  • Urban Revitalization

Do you have an idea for a track? Please let us know!

Other Trip Details

An experiment aimed at understanding the growth and carbon sequestration under elevated CO2 is explained at Oak Ridge National Lab

On the trip, we also explored other issues and visited other relevant places. At the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Labs, we visited the environmental section, where experiments ranging from ways to lessen fish kills from hydroelectric turbines to studies of the potential effects of elevated global CO2 on forest growth were explained.

Early morning mists shroud Fontana Dam, built to provide power to war industries, including Oak Ridge, in the 1940's

On another day we visited the TVA headquarters and the nearby Norris Dam, first of many hydroelectric projects which forever altered both the economy and the riparian ecology of the region.

 Students stroll amid the gardens of Eco-village residents

We ended the trip with a quick visit to Berea College's Eco-village. This complex of apartments uses 75% less water and energy than conventional housing. The progressive environmental and social innovations shown by a sister College provided inspirational and up end to our trip.

 

Tiles created by children in the complex adorn the base of a demonstration straw bale pavilion in the complex

Other Aspects

Wild (feral) ponies visit our campsite on Assateaque Island

On the trip we also visited Assateaque Island and Ocean city Maryland, to contrast the quiet waters of the bay with the open coast of the barrier islands, and the natural Assateaque seashore with developed Ocean City. We concluded the trip in Washington DC, where students had a day to explore the City on their own.

Kapil, John and Wes prepare dinner on Assateaque IslandChemistry Professor Cliff Harris poses with models in one of many shops along the Ocean City BoardwalkErica and Lisa discuss global change policy with Senator Debbie Stabenow's environmental aideStudents relax in the National Building Museum after visiting the display on green building

Natural Florida

reflected_heron

Everglades habitats are dominated by sawgrass prairies, the river of grass, but also include cypress domes, hardwood hammocks, sloughs and coastal mangroves. Functioning naturally, the vast reaches of sawgrass, coupled with un-confined Lake Okeechobee stored seasonal rainfall for much of the dry winter season, and allowed a vast array of wetland- dependant species to flourish. Today, with dikes, canals and roadways that act as dams, hydroperiods are drastically altered, nutrient levels are higher, and the remaining wetlands are to a large extend dependant on human-controlled flows. We can still see the habitats and most of the species, but can only read about and imagine the riotous abundance of birds and other animals that inhabited the natural Everglades.

Without question the Everglades restoration efforts are having a positive impact. We were impressed by the magnitude (and expense) of these efforts. But there is something inelegant about relying on pumps, wells and flooded rock quarries to store water that one was stored by stately flow through the Everglades. If stored water can be sent to the Everglades, it can also be sent to the urban coast. In the face of growing population and inevitable drought years, will people maintain the political will to provide for the natural areas when a literal flip of a switch can divert water to needy humans?

Our last day was spent snorkeling on a reef in the Keys.  For many, this was a highlight.  Even here, change is evident, as much of the coral is bleachedOur last day was spent snorkeling on a reef in the Keys.  For many, this was a highlight.  Even here, change is evident, as much of the coral is bleached

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alumna Hillary Burgess is presently working on an Everglades restoration project.  She led us on a "swamp slough' to a cypress dome.  Left, Hillary shows her mentor, Biologist Dan Skean some orchids in bloom.  Right, John poses with ferns in the dome

Alumna Hillary Burgess is presently working on an Everglades restoration project.  She led us on a "swamp slough' to a cypress dome.  Left, Hillary shows her mentor, Biologist Dan Skean some orchids in bloom.  Right, John poses with ferns in the domeOther creatures encountered included a water moccasin and alligatorsOther creatures encountered included a water moccasin and alligators

 

 

 

 

 

 

For a bird lover, the Everglades remain a paradise.  Clockwise from upper left, Brown Pelican, Anhinga, Cormorant, Little Blue Heron, Great Egret, White IbisFor a bird lover, the Everglades remain a paradise.  Clockwise from upper left, Brown Pelican, Anhinga, Cormorant, Little Blue Heron, Great Egret, White IbisFor a bird lover, the Everglades remain a paradise.  Clockwise from upper left, Brown Pelican, Anhinga, Cormorant, Little Blue Heron, Great Egret, White IbisFor a bird lover, the Everglades remain a paradise.  Clockwise from upper left, Brown Pelican, Anhinga, Cormorant, Little Blue Heron, Great Egret, White IbisFor a bird lover, the Everglades remain a paradise.  Clockwise from upper left, Brown Pelican, Anhinga, Cormorant, Little Blue Heron, Great Egret, White IbisFor a bird lover, the Everglades remain a paradise.  Clockwise from upper left, Brown Pelican, Anhinga, Cormorant, Little Blue Heron, Great Egret, White Ibis

Robyn Murphy

Robyn Murphy, Gerstacker Institute Associate Director
B.A., 1995, Michigan State University

Office: Robinson 106A
Phone: 517/629-0366
Email:

Robyn Murphy is a graduate of Michigan State University's Broad College of Business. She received her bachelor's degree in Human Resource Management. Robyn has worked for a number of different companies earning experience in financial, automotive, staffing and mortgage industries. Those companies included: R.W. Smith, Raymond James, Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., OfficeTeam and Quicken Loans. Most recently, Robyn's area of expertise was to develop staff through feedback, coaching and mentoring. She is thrilled to utilize these resources with the students of the Gerstacker Institute to advance their professional development and align their talents with internships that will excel their education.

Kyle Henry

Kyle Henry, '12

Hometown/High School: Almont, MI; Almont High School

Majors/Minor/Institutes:
Secondary Education English Major with Creative Writing, Political Science Minor; Ford Institute

Campus Organizations:
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity

Why I chose Ford: I chose to join the Ford Institute because it presented me with a wide variety of career plans, even if I wasn't interested in pursuing public policy in the long run. Since I'm going into education, internships and volunteer service have opened my eyes to the importance of public service and how I can make a difference in certain areas. There's no way I would have obtained the same opportunities if I hadn't joined the Ford Institute.

Internship: Chosen as the first Joe Stroud Intern in Journalism and Policy. Worked at the Detroit Free Press, even writing editorial pieces for the paper.

Post Grad Plans: Ideally, I would move to Chicago and teach Secondary English in the downtown school districts. At the same time I would work towards a graduate degree and eventually teach collegiate level creative writing. My ultimate goal is to write for a living; short stories, freelance writing, and eventually novels.

Elizabeth Frankowski

Liz Frankowski, Albion College and Ford Institute Class of 2013Hometown: Washington, MI

Major/Minor/Institutes: Psychology/Political Science/Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service

Campus Organizations: Student Senate, Albion Admissions Tour Guide and Management Team, Alpha Xi Delta Sorority, Student Alumni Association, Phi Alpha Delta Pre-Law Fraternity, Pan-Hellenic Counsel, Mentoring Program with Harrington Elementary, International Honors Society in Psychology Psi Chi

Why I chose Ford: I joined the Ford Institute because I wanted to explore policy issues that are going on in today's society, learn how to analyze these topics, and build leadership experience that would benefit me for my future career as a politician.

Internship plans: I interned for the City of Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado in Miami Florida and for Miami-Dade School Board Member Raquel Regalado.

Post-graduation plans: Dual Program: Law School and Masters in Public Health

Favorite movie about my future career: To Kill a Mockingbird

Current issue/topic that is important to me: The current issue I am most passionate about is the health care reform policy. There are millions of Americans that need health care, but also there are many that take the system for granted. I believe there needs to be some sort of reform, but not to the extent of what is currently in place. Also, there are million of baby boomers that are going to be in need of care in the near future, but will have limited choices of who and when they can see a physician and what kind of treatment they can receive. This policy not only limits the choice of the baby boomer generation, but society as a whole. I believe it should be the patients' choice of what health care provider they should see.

Honors Program

Where curious minds reach higher.

Science. Humanities. Fine arts. Social sciences. Our curriculum immerses you in these four fields of intellectual inquiry, then connects and expands your thinking through a senior Honors thesis.

From our home base inside the campus' historic Observatory building, students in the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program have access to a number of challenging and rewarding experiences. We explore. We create. And we go places (like the Art Institute of Chicago and to Broadway shows around Michigan).

It’s a balance of rigorous academics and social support that works—our students have recently won a National Science Foundation research award, two Morris Udall awards, and a number of Fulbright fellowships.

We're glad you're thinking about Albion's Honors Program. We encourage you to explore our site, and to contact us with any questions.

Apply to Albion College

Dr. Tim Lincoln

Tim Lincoln
Tim Lincoln

Q&A with Tim Lincoln

Students should join CSE because…

"I don't know of any other program that offers such a diverse curriculum and wide range of hands-on experiences. We offer three majors and two concentrations so that students are prepared for a variety of career options when they graduate, and we develop the skills necessary for them to be effective leaders."

Tim’s Best Advice

"Get involved! There are so many opportunities for you to make an impact. Students who find the time to be involved in projects have no problem finding their way into meaningful careers."

Why Tim loves being the Center’s Director

"I enjoy talking to prospective students about the opportunities our program offers, working with students on projects like the Student Farm, and following the careers of our alumni. It’s deeply rewarding. Some of the most interesting things I have seen in my life have been on our field trips."

On his favorite class field trip

"While in Oregon, we hiked the Cascade Mountains, studied sustainable urban development in Portland, looked at ecological research and forest management in the Andrews Experimental Forest, found inspiration in organic farms, spent a day discussing coastal zone management issues with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, and embarked on two scenic train rides on the Empire Builder."

Our field trips are significant because…

"Students are given an opportunity to actually experience different ecosystems of the U.S. They get to see the environmental issues that are happening and get to speak with professionals that are working to resolve them. Friendships and memories are formed on these trips that will last a lifetime."

New Mexico Trip 2013

Cover picture on bluff
Jackie, Scott and Ken overlooking Chaco Canyon

 

The 2013 CSE trip was to New Mexico, where we investigated several themes, water management in a water-poor area, administration of public park land, effects of climate change on civilizations, and, intertwined throughout, the way the history of the many cultures in the region shape the present state of affairs.

Rio Grande and Water 

paige talk
Students discussing water management with a hydrologist from the N.M. Interstate Water Commission
RioG
Jackie, Sara and Kara looking at invasive and highly water-consumptive salt cedar in the Rio Grande bosque, Albuquerque

Early in the trip. We spent a morning with Albion Geology Field camp alumna Page Pegram, now with the Office of the State Engineer’s Interstate Water commission. Page met us in the bosque along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque and explained some of the complexities of complying with interstate water agreements, protecting endangered species and conserving as much water as possible for New Mexico residents.

Native American History and Cultures

Our look at the long and important history of Native Americans began with a visit to the Chaco Culture National Historic Park, arguably the most fabulous archeological site in North America and also one of the most enigmatic. Real questions persist, with discussion of both how the civilization flourished in such a demanding environment and why the area was ultimately abandoned. The relationships among people, culture and climate are central to this discussion. We also visited Bandelier National Monument where more recent Pueblo cliff dwellings are well preserved, and Sky City at Acoma Pueblo, where modern descendants of the Chacoans still live in the longest continuously inhabited community in the country. Finally, we visited the Four Corners Power Plant, one of the most polluting plants in the nation, and considered the complex relationship between the plant and the Navajo Nation, in which it is located.

Acoma Pueblo

Acoma_Distant
"Sky City" of Acoma Pueblo is seen atop its 650 foot meas as we approach for our visit.  This site has been continuously inhabited for over 800 years.
rachel_acoma
Our tour of the pueblo included time to talk with local artists and shop their wares. Here Rachel is considering a traditional pot.
Acoma stairs
Although there is now access to the mesa top via a road constructed in the 1950's, the group opted to return to the base via older stairs cut into the rock.

Chaco Canyon

chaco from above
Pueblo Bonito is one of the best restored "great houses" in the canyon.
chaco in house
Jackie, Sara and Meredith in a room in Pueblo Bonito. Note the small size of the doorways and the lack of windows. Some people believe these indicate the rooms were storerooms for maize.
Chaco Cleft
Jackie follows a cleft to the top of the canyon on the trail to Pueblo Alto.
chaco on cliff copy
Scott, Jackie, Ken and Kara on the cliff behind Pueblo Bonito
Bonita house
View of Pueblo Bonito from the cliff behind it. The enigmatic "D" shape of the pueblo is evident.

Bandelier Archeology

Stairs to cliff In Cliff

 

 

 

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