Meet Our Students

Audit Form

Please use these forms when doing your academic planning.  If you have any questions contact the Gerstacker Institute staff or the Registrar's office.

 

pdfGerstacker Concentrations Audit Form

 

 

Briton Career Connections

Share your Career Experiences and Guide Current Students on their Paths

Location: Kellogg Center 2nd Floor

Date: Friday, October 14, 2016

Time: 1:00p - 3:00p

What is Briton Career Connections?

Briton Career Connections is a great opportunity for alumni and parents to have personal conversations with students about their professional fields in a fair-style format. Attendees will be expected to talk about their career paths and offer suggestions for aspiring young professionals. This is also an ideal time to provide students with information on internships and jobs at your place of work or within your network.

Who Should Participate?

Anyone who would like to provide current students with information on their career path, company/organization or industry. Current professionals, current graduate students, and retired professionals all have very important information to communicate to students.

What is the Format of the Event?

You can choose to attend as an individual or represent your company. Participants will be provided table space that encourages networking with students and other alumni. The atmosphere will be a blend of a college career fair and networking event.

What Will/Should I Do at the Event?

As students visit your table it will be helpful if you can:

  • Recruit for jobs and internships with your company/institution
  • Provide them with information about your career path
  • Advise students about pursuing careers similar to yours
  • Discuss past experiences and what has provided a strong sense of meaning during your career
  • Discuss graduate program options and your experience
  • Communicate pointers about trends in applicable career fields
  • Provide advice regarding students’ networking/elevator speeches

Questions?

Please contact Troy Kase, Director of the Career and Internship Center at or 517/629-0332.

Sign-Up Now!

Deadline: Friday, October 7, 2016

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Students (2)

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2008 Alumni

Majors

  • Suzie Pumpkin
  • Mindy K
  • Pru Dee
  • The Resnet Queen

Minors

  • Julie Cieszkowski
  • Erika Comment
  • Lisa Keef
  • Michael Parka
  • Matthew Miller
  • Sarah Turner
  • Lisa Vacca

Congratulations, seniors!

Big Interview

We are pleased to offer you a free training system that features a new and innovative way to help you prepare more effectively for a job interview.

Big Interview is an online system that combines training AND practice to help improve your interview technique and build your confidence.

You have at your disposal a variety of tools including:

  • Challenging, virtual mock interviews for all experience levels and dozens of industries
  • A database of thousands of interview questions with tips on how to answer them
  • The ability to rate and share your interview answers for feedback
  • A comprehensive video training curriculum covering all aspects of landing a job
  • A step-by-step interview Answer Builder for crafting answers to behavioral questions

How to Register

Here is the info to set up your Big Interview account:

  1. Go to https://albion.biginterview.com/register.
  2. Complete registration process, be sure to use your albion.edu email address.
  3. You'll then receive a confirmation email. Follow the link in that email to start using Big Interview.

Top 5 Tips For Creating a Winning Cover Letter

Cover letters can be a powerful way to add a compelling narrative about your skills to your job application, but like all things career-related, they need to be done effectively.

A cover letter should never be an afterthought. The goal is for your cover letter to enhance your chances of getting an interview, but when done incorrectly, they have the exact opposite effect!

Top 5 tips for creating a winning cover letter

International Education (2)

Albion College is committed to providing students with international learning experiences, and it’s important that our future teachers understand their profession on a global scale. The Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development offers students two different opportunities to study abroad, both of which involve a comparative education inquiry project.

Top Five Learning Goals of International Education for Teachers

  1. Learn how to critically analyze and contextualize the American educational experience.

  2. Gain awareness of personal cultural experiences and values through conversations with host families.

  3. Increase cultural competence by living with a host family and participating in a practicum in a foreign educational setting.

  4. Enhance instructional skills (lesson planning and communication) by teaching lessons in literature, English conversation, and American culture.

  5. Understand the scope of diversity, the influences of globalization, the challenges presented when bridging cultures, and the benefits of creating international opportunities for teaching and learning.
  6.  

20140516 074634Noisy-le-Roi, France

In this course, students will travel to Noisy-le-Roi for two weeks in January where they will live with a host family, visit French schools, and interact with students, faculty, and staff. Upon returning to the U.S., they will present their findings and experience to public school students and to Albion College peers, faculty, and staff during the Capstone Symposium on Teaching.

Heredia, Costa Rica

Students travel to Heredia, Costa Rica for four weeks where they will live with a host family, visit Costa Rican cultural sites, particpate in classes at Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica with Costa Rican peers studying to be teachers, and interact with children, youth, faculty, and staff at Pará School. Focused specifically on teaching English as a foreign language, students will develop an inquiry topic, teach a unit plan, and give a presentation on material culture to frame and focus the practicum. Upon returning to the U.S., they will present their findings and experience to public school students and to Albion College peers, faculty, and staff during the Capstone Symposium on Teaching. Read more!

Abigail E. Cahill

Abigail Cahill
Assistant Professor of Biology

aecahill.weebly.com

B.A., 2007, Colgate University (Biology, French)
Ph.D., 2014, Stony Brook University (Ecology & Evolution)

Appointed: 2016

Expertise Areas: Ecology, evolution, marine biology, dispersal, invertebrate biology

Current Courses:

  • BIO 195 (Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity)
  • BIO 225 (Invertebrate Biology)
  • BIO 289 (Marine Biology)

Research Interests:
Dr. Cahill's research interests center around evolutionary ecology of early life stages of marine species. She is interested in questions relating dispersal of marine invertebrates to other ecological and evolutionary processes, especially how dispersal type can influence local adaptation to temperature regimes and ultimately how these species may or may not evolve in response to global climate change. She is also interested in how marine invertebrate population dynamics are driven by recruitment and subsequent survival, and how these crucial processes are affected by environmental, phenotypic, and genetic variation. Answering these questions involves labwork using molecular methods, as well as lab and fieldwork with live organisms. At Albion, she will be branching out into freshwater invertebrate systems to ask some of these same questions regarding connectivity, dispersal, and life history.

SEA Semester-Woods Hole, MA (4)

Professor Yoshii on the SSV Cramer in the Spanish Mediterranean summer 2014
Professor Yoshii on the SSV Cramer in the Spanish Mediterranean summer 2014.

Subjects: Oceanography, Nautical Science, Maritime Studies

Prerequisities: 3.0 GPA; junior-level standing, interest in science, demonstrated maturity.

Length: Semester--Fall or Spring (12 wks), Summer (8 wks).

For up-to-date information on the whereabouts and activities of our vessels, check out the daily report on the SEA Web site at: http://www.sea.edu

Credit: Up to 17 semester hours or 4.25 Albion College units (4 semester hours = 1 Albion College unit). Credit is apportioned on the 2 components of the program in this way: 2.25 Albion College units for Shore component; 2.00 Albion College units for the Sea component.

Faculty: All of SEA's faculty hold doctorate level degrees. SEA's nautical science faculty are licensed professional Master Mariners who teach nautical science on shore and go to sea as masters of the vessels. The Oceanography faculty teach oceanography on shore and go to sea as Chief Scientists on board the vessels. SEA's Maritime Studies faculty teach maritime studies on shore, providing the humanities focus of ocean study. The SEA faculty is augmented by visiting scholars and lecturers. These men and women have all worked at sea and understand the challenges and rewards of living in and studying the world offshore.

Housing: Cottage dormitories during the shore component, on board a sailing ship during the ship component.

Costs Not Covered by Albion: Transportation to/from Woods Hole; transportation to/from ship (varies depending on which cruise selected); books; board on shore; incidentals.

As early as possible as Sea Education has a rolling basis admissions.

Faculty Advisor: Ruth Schmitter, Putnam 054, 517-629-0379,

Comments: Designed for students with or without oceanographic background or career interests. The program is in two parts: a 6-week shore component that provides classroom-based instruction in theories of sea life; and a 6-week Ship component on board a sailing ship that emphasizes learning through participation and practical experience. Some financial aid is available through the SEA Semester program. See program brochure for more details.

Contact:
Elizabeth Dorr
SEA Semester Admissions Office
Sea Education Association
P. O. Box 6
Woods Hole, MA 02543 Telephone: 800-552-3633, ext 770
Fax: 508-540-0558
E-mail:
Web: http://www.sea.edu

Hal Wyss Endowed Scholarship in Literature

Dr. Hal Wyss taught in the Albion College English Department from 1970-2005. A beloved professor, he specialized in American literature, with a particular love for Hemingway, Frost, Twain, Faulkner, and Melville In addition to courses on composition and linguistics, Professor Wyss developed and taught courses on horror and science fiction, the work of individual authors, literary criticism, and interdisciplinary studies of the environment; he was also named Teacher of the Year and College Advisor of the year during his time at Albion.

An avid birdwatcher and fisherman, Professor Wyss authored two books, on eagles and hummingbirds. As a resident of Albion, he was also deeply involved in the community, holding leadership roles with the Albion First United Methodist Church, the Albion Academy of Lifelong Learning and the Albion Rotary; in addition, he was a member of Albion Community Theatre, the Albion Historical Society and the Riverfront Committee.

In commemoration of Professor Wyss's significant and long-lasting impact at Albion College and on the town of Albion, his family, friends, and alumni established this scholarship to encourage a promising English major with at least sophomore standing and a minimum GPA of 2.7, with preference given to a student from the town of Albion.

Awardees include:

  • 2017 - Alisha Bailey and McKenna Donahue
  • 2016 - Nicole Kurlich and Mary Noble

Kim Tunnicliff Endowment

Kim TunnicliffKim Tunnicliff started his career at Albion College in 1984 when he became a faculty member in the Political Science Department. As director of the then-named Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Service from 1985 to 1999, he placed a special emphasis on developing experiential and international educational experiences for college students. He was highly regarded by his academic colleagues both at Albion and beyond.

Kim's passionate belief in public service brought the level of opportunities for Ford students to new heights that have carried them forward to leadership positions all over the globe. This endowment was established by his family, former students, colleagues, and friends to celebrate his life and the widespread and enduring impact of his legacy at Albion College.

2014 Recipient

Utrata2smallDavid Utrata, ’15

David Utrata is a member of the Ford Institute and the Center for Sustainability and the Environment. As Albion College's first-ever Kim Tunnicliff Fellow, David Utrata spent a semester in Stellenbosch, South Africa. The CIEE Stellenbosch Sustainability and Community study abroad program engages students in a variety of sustainability-related issues that impact present-day South Africa. David will deliver a public presentation on campus summarizing his research in Spring 2015.

Hilary Hernandez Anthony

Hilary Hernandez Anthony, coordinator, Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and ServiceCoordinator, Gerald R. Ford Institute
for Leadership in Public Policy and Service

B.A., 2002, Western Michigan University

Office: 201 Robinson Hall
Email:
Phone: 517/629-0368

Hilary has been dedicated to nurturing growth through theatre and arts education, and holds a B.A. in Theatre Performance from Western Michigan University. Since 2004, Hilary has worked with Education for the Arts at Kalamazoo Regional Educational Service Agency (KRESA) as a teaching artist, program coordinator, and professional development facilitator. Guided by the Aesthetic Education model established at The Lincoln Center in New York, her work has centered on creating experiential learning environments focused on inquiry and reflection. Hilary is delighted that her passions for education and excellence have led her to Albion College, and she looks forward to working alongside the talented students of the Ford Institute.

Meet Our Alumni

It's a tradition going on four decades strong: Gerstacker students become successful and accomplished Gerstacker alumni. Through their efforts both in and out of the classroom, they are well prepared for the workplace and are often making a mark not long after graduating from Albion.

Meet some recent graduates below and see where their Gerstacker experience has taken them.

Kyle Alsheskie, '15Kyle Alsheskie, ’15

Associate Auditor
KPMG

Alex Archer, '13Alex Archer, ’13

Zone Manager
Ford Motor Co.

Mallory Brown, '08Mallory Brown, ’08

Founder and CEO
World Clothes Line

David Budka, '13David Budka, ’13

Financial Analyst
Dow Corning

Aaron Croad, '12Aaron Croad, ’12

Data Analytics Consultant
Ernst & Young

Blake DeCarlo, '09Blake DeCarlo, ’09

Account Executive
Bella Design Group

DeckerA64x91Alex Decker, ’15

Assurance Practice
Ernst & Young

Caroline Dobbins, '12Caroline Dobbins, ’12

Fellow, Challenge Detroit
Leadership Program

Marisa Fortuna, '07Marisa Fortuna, ’07

Graduate Student
Ford School of Public Policy
University of Michigan

Brooke Kaltz, '05Brooke Kaltz, ’05

Non-Production Material Network Management Americas
Mercedes-Benz USA

Sumedha Makker, '11Sumedha Makker, ’11

MBA Candidate
Class of 2017 at Indiana University Kelley School of Business

Trent Mikek, '15Trent Mikek, ’15

Ernst & Young

D.J. Mocini, '08D.J. Mocini, ’08

Assistant Men's Basketball Coach
Northwood University

MyersA64x91Amber Myers, ’13

Pursuing a JD at Michigan State University College of Law

Marty Nesbitt, '85Marty Nesbitt, ’85

Co-Owner, The Vistria Group
Treasurer,'08 and '12 Obama
presidential campaigns

Doug Parker, '84Doug Parker, ’84

Chief Executive Officer
American Airlines Group

John Pearce, '11John Pearce, ’11

Quantitative Analyst
Northpointe Capital

Kathleen Petchell, '13Kathleen Petchell, ’13

Completed Masters of Accountancy, U of M Tax Associate
Plante Moran

Moose Scheib, '02Moose Scheib, ’02

Founder and CEO
LoanMod.com

Victoria Slater, '14Victoria Slater, ’14

Completed program in December 2013; graduate study at London School of Economics (Fall 2014)

Connie Van Onselder, '84Connie Van Onselder, ’84

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Keeneland Association

Research Grants 2012-2013

Anthropology

Identifying Michigan's Native Projectile Points
Anthony Marchello (Adviser: Dr. Chase)

Art

Narratives on "House" and "Sleep"
Soe Yu Nwe (Adviser: Prof. McCauley)

Biology

Quantitative Investigation of an a-Synuclein-Proteasome Interaction: A Model For Parkinson's Disease In Drosophila Melanogaster
Ethan Brock (Adviser: Dr. Saville)

A Drosophila Model For Characterization of Mumps Viral/Host Interactions
Adam Ronk (Adviser: Dr. Saville)

Quantitative Investigation of an a-Synuclein-Proteasome Interaction: A Model for Parkinson's Disease in Drosophila Melanogaster
Luke Salbert (Adviser: Dr. Saville)

Chemistry

Toward the Synthesis of Ethyl-3-oxo-4-(2,3,4,5,6-pentadeuterophenyl) butanoate
Chelsea Copi (Adviser: Dr. Harris)

Palladium Nanoparticles on Carbon Microspheres as a Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions
Michael Dix (Adviser: Dr. Metz)

Does Changing the Substituents on Vanadium Complexes Impact Their Toxicity Toward Cancer Cells?
Hayley Gerber (Adviser: Dr. McCaffrey)

Manipulation of Palladium Nanoparticles Tethered to Graphitic Carbon
Christopher Kruppe (Adviser: Dr. Metz)

Trifluoromethylation of Duff Formylated Bromo Substituted Phenols
Mitchell Pender (Adviser: Dr. McCaffrey)

Room Temperature Shaped Palladium Nanoparticle Synthesis on Carbon Supports
Stephanie Sanders (Adviser: Dr. Metz)

Isolation and Evaluation of Biologically Active Chemotherapeutic Compound, Polophyllotoxin from Juniperus Scopulorum Post Essential Oil Extraction
Krysta Schroeder (Adviser: Dr. French)

Isolation of Podophyllotoxim from Juniperus Scopulorum Post Essential Oil Extraction"
Krysta Schroeder (Adviser: Dr. French)

Catalytic Hydrogenation of Alkenes Using Palladium Nanoparticles (PdNP's)
Joseph Thomas (Adviser: Dr. Harris)

Preparation and Use of PdNP Catalysts For Hydrogenation of Organic Compounds
Joseph Thomas (Adviser: Dr. Harris)

The Taylor Reaction: Mn Mediated Homocoupling of Organoboranes
Robert Wells-Schmidt (Adviser: Dr. Harris)

Communications

The Use and Meaning of Emoticons in Text Messaging Among College-Aged Students
Alicia Rigoni (Adviser: Mr. Boyan)

Political Science

Health Needs
Michelle Burke (Adviser: Dr. Rose)

Psychology

The Effects of Client Feedback on Therapeutic Outcome
Alice Coyne (Adviser: Dr. Keyes)

The Benefits of Equine Assisted Therapy
Amanda Douglas (Adviser: Mr. Hill)

Philosophies, Methods, and Success Rates of Anorixia Nervosa Treatment
Kate Pickworth (Adviser, Dr. Keyes)

Linear Versus Non-Linear Text: Effect of Pedagogical Aids on Text Comprehension
Anne Sutherland (Adviser: Dr. Carlson)

The Impact of Teaching Students About the Research on Gay and Lesbian Parenting
Jessica Weiler (Adviser: Dr. Elischberger)

Major and Minor (2)

Requirements for Major

Note: Classes in italics are taught during Summer College.

To assist students in their academic planning, see a sample four-year course of study.

A minimum of eight and one-half units including the following:

  • Business 111, Gerstacker Leadership Workshop (1/4 unit)
  • Economics and Management 211, Financial Accounting
  • Intercultural/Global Issues:
    One unit selected from the following:
    Modern Languages and Cultures 105, Intercultural Understanding and Global Issues;
    Economics and Management 362, International Management; French 201, Intermediate French or higher; German 201, Intermediate German or higher; or Spanish 201, Intermediate Spanish or higher
  • Ethics: One unit selected from the following:
    Philosophy 301, Environmental Ethics
    Philosophy 302, Leadership Ethics
    Philosophy 303, Business Ethics
    Philosophy 304, Ethics and Public Policy
    Philosophy 308, Biomedical Ethics
    Philosophy 309, International Ethics and Global Development
  • English 208, Professional Writing
  • Communication Studies 242, Professional Communication
  • Management/Psychology: One unit at the 300-level
  • Economics and Management 357, Business Functions
  • Two one-unit internships:
    Two options are available for fulfilling the internship requirement: (1) two full-time internships or (2) one full-time internship and one off-campus semester in an approved Albion College program
  • Senior Capstone (1/4 unit)
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

The following are required in addition to the major:

  • Statistics:
    Mathematics 209, An Introduction to Statistics; Mathematics 309, Mathematical Statistics; or Economics and Management 235, Economic Statistics (1 unit)
    Or
    Psychology 204, Research Design and Analysis I, and 206, Research Design and Analysis II (2 units)
  • Economics and Management 230, Intermediate Microeconomics or 232, Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • Completion of a second area of specialization selected from these options: (1) an existing Albion College minor, (2) a College-approved emphasis or concentration, (3) a second major, or (4) a five-unit area of focus, determined in collaboration with the Gerstacker Institute director, along with the majority approval of the Gerstacker Internal Advisory Committee and the provost.

Requirements for Minor

A minimum of five and one-quarter to seven units including the following:

Core requirements:

  • Business 111, Gerstacker Leadership Workshop (1/4 unit)
  • Economics and Management 211, Financial Accounting (1 unit)
  • Economics and Management 259, Management/Psychology (1 unit)

Choice of one in each section:

  • English 208, Professional Writing OR Communication Studies 242, Professional Communication
  • Intercultural/Global Issues. One unit selected from the following:
    Modern Languages and Cultures 105, Intercultural Understanding and Global Issues; Economics and Management 362, International Management; French 201, Intermediate French or higher; German 201, Intermediate German or higher; or Spanish 201, Intermediate Spanish or higher

OR

Ethics - One unit selected from the following:
Philosophy 301, Environmental Ethics
Philosophy 302, Leadership Ethics
Philosophy 303, Business Ethics
Philosophy 304, Ethics and Public Policy
Philosophy 308, Biomedical Ethics
Philosophy 309, International Ethics and Global Development

Internship

  • Business and Organizations 392 (1 unit) - Two options:
    1. One full-time internship, or
    2. One off-campus semester in an approved Albion College program that combines course work and an internship

The following are required in addition to the minor:

  • Economics and Management 101, Principles of Microeconomics (1 unit)
  • Statistics:
    Mathematics 209, An Introduction to Statistics; Mathematics 309, Mathematical Statistics; or Economics and Management 235, Economic Statistics (1 unit)
    Or
    Psychology 204, Research Design and Analysis I, and 206, Research Design and Analysis II (2 units)

Area of Focus

Business Communication
Effective communication is the foundation of every effective business. The area of focus in business communication draws from communication studies, management and psychological sciences in order to better equip students with the necessary skills and abilities. Specifically, students will gain a better understanding of communication and associated techniques, human behavior, motivation, and performance, and how to effectively manage the resources of a business (human, financial and physical). Careers individuals pursue with an interest in business communication include public relations/media relations, corporate communications, public affairs, investor relations, government relations, marketing communication, and community relations.

The business communication area of focus is designed around two components: (1) a common core of two fundamental courses, and (2) a variety of courses addressing critical areas of business communication.

Requirements for the area of focus in business communication (5 units) are: Communication Studies 203 and Psychology 236; and three units chosen from the following electives: Communication Studies 205, 303, 306; Economics and Management 358, 359; Psychology 346.

All courses for an area of focus must be taken for a numerical grade.

Japanese Courses

Japanese

101 Elementary Japanese (1)
Stresses the grammatical structures and vocabulary of spoken and written Japanese, and offers practice in conversation and in writing Chinese characters. Also emphasizes Japanese culture and intercultural understanding between Japanese and U.S. cultures. Includes how to interact in a culturally and socially appropriate manner in specific situations. Staff.

102 Elementary Japanese, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Japanese 101 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Japanese 101. Staff.

201 Intermediate Japanese (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Japanese 102 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Japanese 102. Staff.

202 Intermediate Japanese, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Japanese 201 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Japanese 201. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 Upper Intermediate Japanese (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Japanese 202.
Builds a high level of proficiency in Japanese. Emphasizes producing conversation and expanding vocabulary in both speaking and writing. Weekly tutorials on class material and Japanese culture. Staff.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

Dawid Tatarczyk

Dawid TatarczykDawid Tatarczyk's research examines the political influence of the Catholic Church in consolidated democracies. His dissertation utilizes a variety of research methods, including QCA and process tracing to analyze 24 OECD countries. The primary goal of the dissertation is to explain which combination of institutional conditions (i.e. Catholic electorate, referenda, and Christian Democratic Parties) is necessary/sufficient for the Church to exercise political influence.

2011 Alumni

Majors

  • Christopher DeLong
  • Grace Gibson
  • Elizabeth Heimler
  • Julia Humenik
  • Virginia Mapes
  • Jessica McGarity
  • Kayla Schultz
  • Katherine Wiese

Minors

  • Alexandra Beach
  • Emily Comella
  • John Forgrave
  • Jessica Homrich
  • Nicholas Lane
  • Daniel Palmer
  • Mathew Peters
  • Sandeep Singh
  • Matthew Van Linden
  • Rhonda Vander Zwaag
  • Daniel Willenberg

Centers and Institutes

You’ll live in the real world. Prepare to succeed there now.

That's the genius behind Albion's Centers and Institutes. Regardless of your academic and career interests, these programs add value through specialized academic offerings and opportunities. Put your learning to work through internships, research and other pre-professional experiences. Give yourself a distinct advantage when applying to graduate or professional school. Or landing your first job after graduation.

Our Centers and Institutes…

  • Enhance your academic major

  • Build self-confidence and leadership skills

  • Develop your problem-solving and communication skills valued by employers

  • Create a community of students who share your interests and aspirations

  • Connect you with alumni for networking and career relationships

Nick Whitney, ’00

Nick Whitney, ’082017 Elkin R. Isaac Alumni Lecture

“How to Be a Shark Scientist (or Anything Else)”

Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 7:30 p.m.
Towsley Lecture Hall/Norris 101

Nick Whitney is a senior scientist with the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life at New England Aquarium and is currently in residence at Newport Aquarium in Newport, Kentucky.

Born in Jackson, Michigan, he grew up knowing one thing about sharks: they eat you. By the time he finished high school—and after reading a lot about sharks—Whitney was a bona fide shark nut and aspiring marine biologist. At Albion College, he learned the basics of field research, studying nurse sharks in the Florida Keys with Dr. Jeffrey Carrier. After graduating from Albion, Whitney pursued his master’s and doctoral degrees at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, where he learned that sharks actually can be dangerous if you grab their tails and refuse to let go, or if you swim directly into their open mouths.

Whitney has spent the past several years developing the use of accelerometers that can sense sharks’ fine-scale movements, measuring with great precision how they swim, tilt, roll, and dive. In the process, these tags are starting to shed light on a long-in-the-dark shark mystery: Although scientists have known where the animals go, they generally have had no idea what the sharks are actually doing when they go there. Whitney is using technology found in a wearable fitness tracker or smartphone to answer the “What are they doing?” question, and it turns out they are doing some surprising things.

The first to deploy accelerometers on wild sharks, Whitney has since used the tags on white sharks, sea turtles, Burmese pythons, and several other species. He has published numerous scientific papers, magazine articles, and encyclopedia articles, and has appeared on television on the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, and the National Geographic Channel.

Whitney received the “Top 10 in 10” Young Alumni Award from Albion College in 2010. He lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, with his wife of 16 years, Holli (Mezeske), ’99, and their three children.

Experience Opportunities

Tom Dukes, '13, spent six months in Germany, primarily in Dresden and Tubingen.
Tom Dukes, '13, spent six months in Germany, mainly in Dresden and Tübingen.

Fluency in more than one language and understanding other cultures are essential skills for living and working in our increasingly internationalized world. Students pursuing French, German, Japanese and Spanish at Albion College will discover how people in other parts of the world think and express their ideas and beliefs, all while practicing and mastering their language of study through a number of ways.

First-, Second-, and Third-Year Courses

Besides introducing students to culture, all of the department's language courses emphasize the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Incorporated into classes are culturally authentic videos, films, radio programs and Internet sites, as well as music from foreign countries.

Outside the classroom, Native Speaker Teaching Assistants and advanced language students assist small groups of students in tutorials once a week. Language students also meet once each week for lunch with faculty, teaching assistants, native speakers and other students to practice their language skills in a more relaxed setting. Classroom study is further supplemented with language CDs that can be used in any campus computer lab or your dorm room.

Upper-Level Courses

Cultural, historical, literary and filmic texts are the focus of the department's upper-level courses, which are all taught in the target languages and which are designed to increase your awareness and understanding of different world views, arts and traditions. In this process, you will also gain a richer understanding of yourself and your own culture.

Additional Opportunities

Katie Stephens, '12, studied for a year in Argentina.
Katie Stephens, '12, studied off-campus for a year in Argentina.

As a language major or minor at Albion College, you are required to live in the I-Space, our international language living and learning area, located in Fiske House, for at least one semester. Native Speaker Teaching Assistants help students learn more about the culture of their country, while also helping students refine their conversational skills in a residential setting. Students pledge to speak the intended language within their living quarters.

Kids at Hope program, which meets weekly at the First United Methodist Church in Albion, helps language majors spread their own enjoyment of language learning to a younger generation by volunteering their time to teach Albion area grade-school children French and Spanish. 

All Modern Language majors and minors are strongly encouraged to participate in one of several approved off-campus programs.

Please see our Faculty and Staff page for contact information for each of the professors, who will be glad to answer questions you may have about our program.

Selva J. Raj Memorial Scholarship

This award was established in March of 2008 in memory of Dr. Selva J. Raj (1952 – 2008). Dr. Raj was a beloved and outstanding scholar, teacher, and colleague. Recipients of the scholarship are announced at Albion College's Honors Convocation each April.

2014 Laxmi Kotha

2013 Christina Hallam

2012 Dustin Moretz

2011 Christopher White

2010 Julia Humenik

2009 Christina Griffith and Steven Maisel

Andrew Kercher

kercherandrew3

Hometown/High School: Port Huron, MI; Port Huron Northern High School

Majors/Minors/Institutes: History and Philosophy Majors; Ford Institute

Campus Organizations: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia music fraternity, Nwagni Project

Why I Chose Ford: Ford allowed me to stay involved with my love for politics without having to devote so much time and classes to being a fully fledged Poli Sci major. It allowed me to be involved in the community and provided many opportunities and connections I would never otherwise had.

Internship: Historic Interpreter, Mackinac State Historic Parks

Post Grad Plans: I plan on going to grad school for museum studies, and I ultimately wish to stay employed in the museum field.

Experience Opportunities

Professors Trisha Franzen and Ruth Schmitter talk about the women's and gender studies program with a student.Drawing on the knowledge and methodologies associated with a number of different disciplines, the Albion women's and gender studies prorgram examines the role of gender through five distinct areas of study: Historical Contexts, Representations, Global Perspectives, Self-Making, and Institutions or Systems of Knowledge. Each area uses cross-cultural or multicultural investigations to understand the dynamics and differences in the operation of gender.

Within specific contexts but also across differences, the program also focuses on the lives of women—on women's past and present active involvement in the making of the world. Students experience this ongoing interplay of theory and practice both in the classroom and in the field, through research as well as through off-campus opportunities, including:

Please contact the Women's and Gender Studies Department for more information about the experiential learning possibilities within our program.

Academic Catalogs

The academic catalogs at Albion College are organized by school year and govern the requirements for degrees dictate for the incoming class of students for that year.  

These links below will take you to the catalog of entry for your incoming class:

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Timothy N. Lincoln

LincolnT 0206 cropProfessor of Geology

Albion College, Albion, MI 49224
Office: Palenske 121

517/629-0486

Courses taught:

  • Geology 101 Introductory Geology
  • Geology 115 Oceans Atmosphere and Climate
  • Geology 202 Ground Water
  • Geology 210 Regional Field Geology
  • Geology 307 Geochemistry
  • Environmental 210 Ecology and Environmental Field Trip
  • Environmental 206 Sustainable Living Seminar

Research Interests

With my wife Beth I am working on a long-term project mapping several quadrangles in the Precambrian core of the Black Hills, South Dakota.  I also collaborate with Thom Wilch and our students on geochemistry and hydrology projects in the Kalamazoo River watershed.

Recent Publications

Lincoln, Beth Z.; Lincoln, Timothy N.; Wilch, Thomas I.; Menold, Carrie; and McRivette, Michael (2011) Albion College’s ore exploration game: An integrative exercise.  In the Trenches, v. 2 No. 4 pp. 10-11.

Fagnon, Brian, Lincoln, Timothy N. and Lincoln, Beth Z. (2011) Geologic Map of Wind Cave National Park. South Dakota Geological Survey 7.5 Minute Series Geologic Quadrangle Map 14, Scale 1:24000.

Fagnon, Brian, Lincoln, Timothy N., Lincoln, Beth Z., and Dyk, Darren W. (2011) Geologic Map of the Wind Cave Quadrangle, South Dakota. South Dakota Geological Survey 7.5 Minute Series Geologic Quadrangle Map 15, scale 1:24000.

Recent Presentations

Wilch, T.I. and Lincoln, T.N. (2013) Monitoring and characterization of the Upper Kalamazoo Watershed, MI: Undergraduate research in a local natural laboratory. Geol. Soc. Am. Abstracts with Programs v. 45, no.4, p. 69.

Wilch, Thomas I.; Bartels, William S.; Lincoln, Beth Z; Lincoln, Timothy N.; Menold, Carrie;  and McRivette, Michael (2011) Using assessment and program review to strengthen geology programs: An example from Albion College. Geol Soc Am. Abstracts with Programs v. 43, no. 5 p. 298.

Lincoln, Beth Z.; Lincoln, Timothy N.; Wilch, Thomas I.; Menold, Carrie; and McRivette, Michael (2011)  Albion College’s ore exploration game: An integrative exercise. Geol Soc Am. Abstracts with Programs v. 43, no. 5 p. 133.

Lincoln, Timothy N. and Lincoln, Beth Z. (2009) Precambrian geology of Wind Cave National Park, Black Hills, South Dakota.  Geol. Soc. Am. Abstracts with Programs v. 41, no.7.

Lincoln, Beth Z.; Bartels, William S.; Lincoln, Timothy N.; Menold, Carrie; Van de Ven, Christopher; and Wilch, Thomas I. (2007)  Research experiences for first and second year students at Albion College.  Geol. Soc. Am. Abstracts with Programs v. 39, no. 6, p. 247.

Lincoln, Timothy N., 2006, Teaching instrumentation in an advanced undergraduate geochemistry course.  Geol. Soc. Am. Abstracts with Programs, v. 38, no. 7, p. 284.

Lincoln, Timothy N. and Lincoln, Beth Z., 2004, Faulting in the Cicero Peak Quadrangle, Black Hills, South Dakota. Geol. Soc. Am. Abstracts with Programs, v. 36, no. 5, p.569

Lincoln, Timothy N. and Lincoln, Beth Z., 2003, Geology of the Cicero Peak and Mount Coolidge Quadrangles, Black Hills, South Dakota. Geol. Soc. Am. Abstracts with Programs, v.35, no. 6, p. 506

Curriculum

The major in Public Policy provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the mechanisms by which government interacts with stakeholders for the common good. It draws on the principles, practices, and research methods of the social sciences and philosophy to provide students with the theoretical and analytic skills relevant to today’s most pressing global issues. While discussions of public policy issues are often controversial and polarized, the underlying principle of the major is one of sound analysis first and logical advocacy second. These skills are further developed through internship and/or practical research experiences.

Students who major in Public Policy often enter careers in the government or within the government relations sections of the private sector. The major also provides a strong background for students planning to attend law school or to continue on with graduate studies in public policy, public administration, public health, or social policy.

The Public Policy major has 10 units:

  • Five units: Economics and Management 101 and 230, Philosophy 304, and Political Science 216 and 338.

  • One unit in statistics chosen from among Economics and Management 235, Mathematics 209.

  • One unit in research methods chosen from among Anthropology and Sociology 224, Economics and Management 379, and Political Science 100.

  • Two units, which must be taken in two different departments, chosen from the following restricted electives related to public policy:

    • Anthropology and Sociology 345, 370
    • Economics and Management 232, 273, 322, 323, 331, 353, 354, 375
    • Education 202
    • Environment 220
    • History 243
    • Philosophy 206, 301, 302, 303, 308, 335
    • Political Science 214, 220, 319, 322, 323, 324
    • Substitutions as approved by the Ford Institute Director.
  • One unit from among an internship, Honors Thesis, or directed study in Public Policy approved by the Ford Institute Internal Advisory Committee.

  • A substantial paper and an oral presentation on a topic related to public policy.  This paper and presentation will be completed as one of the requirements listed above.

Students who double major in Public Policy and another field may count up to one unit towards the requirements of both majors. If there is more than one unit of overlap between the majors, then the student must take additional electives in one of the majors to substitute for every unit of overlap beyond one in consultation with the Department Chair or Program Director.

Students who enroll in the Washington Semester program at the American University can receive up to two units of credit toward the requirements of the Public Policy major, subject to the approval of the Ford Institute Director and the Ford Internal Advisory Committee.

Conference Grants 2012-2013

Allgaier, Hannah (Adviser: Christopher Rohlman). "Identification of the DNA Binding Surface on the SIRV Capsid Protein." Presented at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Annual Meeting, April 20-24, 2013. Boston, MA.

Anderson, Dana (Adviser: Barbara Keyes). "Degrees, Methods, and Locations of Outpatient Practitioners Treating Anorexia Nervosa." Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

Baguzis, Melissa (Adviser: W. Jeffrey Wilson). "Automated Detection of Movement and Location of an Earthworm." Presented at the Pavlovian Society Meeting, September 20-23, 2012. Jersey City, NJ.

Blauvelt, Kelsi (Adviser: Nicolle Zellner). "Automated Methods for MALDI-TOF MS Analysis of Samples." Presented at the Michigan Space Grant Consortium, October 6, 2012. Ann Arbor, MI.

Copi, Chelsea (Adviser: Cliff Harris). "Toward the Synthesis of 6-benzyl-2-thiouracil." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Coyne, Alice (Adviser: Barbara Keyes). "Methodological Challenges: Conducting Practice-Based Research In a Small Outpatient Clinic." Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

Dix, Michael (Adviser: Kevin Metz). "Palladium Nanoparticles on Porous Carbon Microspheres As Catalysts For Hydrogenation Reactions." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Dougherty, Grace (Adviser: Christopher Rohlman). "The Role of CSF1 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma-recruited Macrophages." Presented at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Annual Meeting, April 20-24, 2013. Boston, MA.

Earl, Erica (Adviser: Vanessa McCaffrey). "Formation of Erythrose From Glycoaldegyde Using Bentonite Clay as a Catalyst."  Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Ganem, Alysandra (Adviser: Nicolle Zellner). "Lunar Astrophotography." Presented at the Michigan Space Grant Consortium, October 6, 2012. Ann Arbor, MI.

Gerber, Hayley (Adviser: Vanessa McCaffrey). "The Effect of Electron Density Within Vanadium Complexes Having Differing Substituents on Toxicity to Cancer Cells." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Habicht, M. Helen (Adviser: Carrie Menold). "Quantifying Paths in UHP Terranes: A 3-D Approach Using Thermobarometry and Field Relationships." Presented at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, November 4-7, 2012. Charlotte, NC.

Hiday, Aaron (Adviser: Timothy Lincoln). "Investigation of Bioturbation and Groundwater Sapping as Possible Causes of Diel Turbidity Cycles in Rice Creek, Kalamazoo Watershed in Michigan." Presented at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, November 4-7, 2012. Charlotte, NC.

Kribs, Zachary (Adviser: Andrew Christopher). "Age, Personality, and Time of Day Preference: A Meditational Relationship." Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

Kruppe, Christopher (Adviser: Kevin Metz). "Synthesis of Shaped Nanoparticles Structured to Supports." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Nanna, Alex (Adviser: Andrew French). "Methylation of Heterocycles Using Fenton Chemistry."  Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Nwe, Phu Khat (Adviser: Andrew French). "Synthesis and Evaluation of a New Substrate For Aryl Iodide Organocatalysis." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Paxton, Holly (Adviser: W. Jeffrey Wilson). "Automated Detection of Movement and Location of an Earthworm." Presented at the Pavlovian Society Meeting, September 20-23, 2012. Jersey City, NJ.

Pender, Mitchell (Adviser: Vanessa McCaffrey). "Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Bis-sulfate-bridged Binuclear Oxovanadium (IV) Macrocyclic Complexes." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Pickworth, Katie (Adviser: Barbara Keyes). "Degrees, Methods, and Locations of Outpatient Practitioners Treating Anorexia Nervosa." Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

Plasman, Haley (Adviser: Dean McCurdy). "Using Macroinvertebrates as Bioindicators of Water Quality in Rice Creek, Michigan." Presented at the Benthic Ecological Meeting, March 20-23, 2013. Savannah, GA.

Renaud, Elizabeth (Adviser: W. Jeffrey Wilson). "The Annelidometer: Automated Monitoring of an Earthworm's Position and Movement." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Sanders, Stephanie (Adviser: Kevin Metz). "Room Temperature Synthesis of Shaped Palladium Nanoparticles on Carbon Substrates." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Schroeder, Krysta (Adviser: Andrew French). "Isolation of Podophyllotoxin From Juniperus scopulorum Post Essential Oil Extraction." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Schuetz, Blake (Adviser: Eric Hill). "Authoritarian Parenting, Cognitive Style, and the Religious Fundamentalism-Homonegativity Relationship." Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

Shewach, Oren (Adviser: Andrew Christopher). "The Protestant Work Ethic: Its Relationship to the Big Five Personaltiy Factors." Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

Sovansky, Erin (Adviser: Mareike Wieth). "Creativity in Musicians: Creativity Requires More Than Simply Playing Music." Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

Spencer-Sturdavant, William (Adviser: Vanessa McCaffrey). "Optimization of the Acetoxylation of (+)-Limonene in the Presence of Zeolite H-beta." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Sutherland, Annie (Adviser: Jacque Carlson). "Pedagogical Aids in College Textbooks: Aids Do Not Significantly Facilitate Learning." Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

Thomas, Joseph (Adviser: Cliff Harris). "Preparation and Use of PdNP Catalysts For Hydrogenation of Organic Compounds." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Walker, Ryan (Adviser: Andrew Christopher). "The Effects of Friendship Level on the Use of the Anchoring Heuristic: Who Do You Trust?" Presented at The Society for Personality and Social Psychology National Conference January 17-19, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Ward, Anna (Adviser: Dean McCurdy). "Using Macroinvertebrates as Bioindicators of Water Quality in Rice Creek, Michigan." Presented at the Benthic Ecological Meeting, March 20-23, 2013. Savannah, GA.

Waun, Cassaundra (Adviser: Vanessa McCaffrey). "Analysis of Glycolaldehyde After Simulated Terrestrial Impact Experiments." Presented at the Michigan Space Grant Consortium, October 6, 2012. Ann Arbor, MI.

Waun, Cassaundra (Adviser: Vanessa McCaffrey). "Analysis of Glycolaldehyde After Simulated Meteoritic Impact Experiments." Presented at the 245th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 6-9, 2013. New Orleans, LA.

Weiss, Brian (Adviser: Andrew Christopher). "Openness and Divergent Thinking: Investigating Possible Mediating Factors."  Presented the the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention, May 23-26, 2013. Washington, DC.

 

 

Summer Research Projects, Summer 2015

Anthropology and Sociology 

A Theoretical Synthesis of Poverty and Dehumanization
Yuanyuan Liu (Adviser: Scott Melzer)

Art and Art History

The Underdog-A Graphic Novel
Shenoa Butcher (Adviser: Ashley Feagin)

Materializing Virtual Weaponry
Austin Christie (Adviser: Lynne Chytilo)

Beyond Dates: A Photographic Presentation of Albion’s History
Audrey DeGroot (Adviser: Ashley Feagin)

An Exploration of Sculptural Form Based on Personal Vulnerability
Taylor Shell (Adviser: Lynne Chytilo)

Biochemistry

Synthesis and Characterization of Nucleic Acid Aptamers Targeted at Aspergillus Galactomannan Surface Carbohydrate
Jessica Bush (Adviser: Christopher Rohlman)

Synthesis and Characterization of Nucleic Acid Aptamers Targeted at Aspergillus Fungus Cell Surface Carbohydrates
Megan Sheridan (Adviser: Christopher Rohlman)

Biology

Testing the Novel Weapons Hypothesis: Does Spotted Knapweek (Centaurea macula Lam.) have an Allopathic Impact?
Elise Anderson (Adviser: Sheila Lyons-Sobaski)

Role of Micro RNA in Cytokine Production
Zachary Barry (Adviser: Brad Rabquer)

Neural Alpha Synuclein-Proteasome Interaction in a Drosophila Model of Parkinson’s Disease
Erik Brink (Adviser: Ken Saville)

Effect of Parental Provisioning on Post-Fledgling Behaviour of House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon)
William Davis (Adviser: E. Dale Kennedy)

Micro RNA, miR-9 and mir181c, Regulation of Monocyte Migration and Cytokine Production in Inflammation
Joshua Gaudette (Adviser: Brad Rabquer)

Effect of Noise on Nestling Responses to Food Calls in House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon)
Carleigh McMahon (Adviser: E. Dale Kennedy)

Vanadium Complexes Inhibit the Growth of HT-29 and MCF-7 Cell Lines Through Possible Apoptotic Pathways
Brandon Moretti (Adviser: Brad Rabquer)

An Exploration of GMOs as a Means of Learning about Science Writing
Emma Stapley (Adviser: Dan Skean)

Effect of iButton Color on Parental Provisioning and Post-Fledgling Behaviour of House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon)
Stephanie Thurner (Adviser: E. Dale Kennedy)

Testing the Novel Weapons Hypothesis: Does Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa Lam.) have an Allelopathic Impact?
Angela Walczyk (Adviser: Sheila Lyons-Sobaski)

Chemistry

Optimization of Boronic Acid Homocouplings
Pietro Geisler (Adviser: Cliff Harris)

Assessment and Design of Mobile Apps for Aiding Understanding of Molecular Structure
Courtney Kondor (Adviser: Craig Bieler)

Quantitive Water Testing Using API Kits
Alyssa Obert (Adviser: Vanessa McCaffrey)

Communications

A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Relationship Development Using Tinder
Laura Yurgalite (Adviser: Karen Erlandson)

Economics and Management

Albion Accelerator-"Albion MakerSpace"
Alex Kulogowski (Adviser: Vicki Baker)
 

English

Animal Geography: Contributing to the Map of Early Modern London (MoEML)
Kathleen Casebeer (Adviser: Ian MacInnes)

Mapping Early Modern London: Examining the Impact of Animals upon the Development of London Society
Dana Demchak (Adviser: Ian MacInnes)

Finding the Missing Puzzle Piece: My Life With an Autistic Brother
Melanie Fodera (Adviser: Glen Deutsch)

Ford Institute

Recreation Master Plan for the City of Albion
Alena Farooq (Adviser: Patrick McLean)

The Social and Economic Impact of Recreational Trails on Michigan Communities
Danielle Nelson (Adviser: Patrick McLean)

Geology

Systematics and Evolution of Eocene Dermatemydid Turtles
Emily Ebaugh (Adviser: William Bartels)

A Description and Systematic Analysis of Eocene Basin-Center Crocodylids From the Green River Basin, Wyoming
Daniel Traub (Adviser: William Bartels)

Math and Computer Science

Mathematical Abstraction of Contrapuntal Elements in N-tone Pitch Systems
Jonathan Takeshita (Adviser: Mark Bollman)

Microbiology

Determining the Optimal Metalloid Concentration for Hydrolytic Enzyme Activities of Microbial Communities
Lauren Rasmussen (Adviser: Ola Olapade)

Music

An Intensive Exploration of the Art of Jazz Improvisation
Sarah McDaniel (Adviser: Dan Palmer)

Physics

Evaluation of Entrance Materials
Kevin Claucherty (Adviser: Charles Moreau)

Psychology

Effect of MK-801 on Learning Capabilities of Lumbricus terrestris
Brandon Johnson (Adviser: W. J. Wilson

Family Cohesiveness and Attitudes Toward People Who Seek Psychological Counseling
Jessica McKindles (Adviser: Eric Hill)

 

Résumés

Often the resume is the first piece of information that an employer sees about you.  It is of utmost importance to make your resume professional and communicate your intended message. We can help you demystify the process!

Please review our comprehensive pdfResume Handout for resume information. Seeking personalized help with your résumé? Schedule an appointment with the Career and Internship Center.

National Scholarships and Fellowships

2016-2017 Reading Series

Lauren AcamporaLauren Acampora

Fiction Reading
Thursday, March 16, 2017, 5:10 p.m.
Wendell Will Room

Lauren Acampora is the author of The Wonder Garden (Grove Atlantic), a collection of linked stories which won the GLCA New Writers Award for Fiction (2016), and was both a finalist for the New England Book Award and on the longlist for The Story Prize. The book was also a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection and an Indie Next selection, and was chosen as one of the best books of the year by NPR. Acampora’s stories have appeared in literary journals such as The Paris Review, Missouri Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and Antioch Review. She has received fellowships from the Ucross Foundation, Writers OMI International Residency, and the Ragdale Foundation. A graduate of Brown University and Brooklyn College, Acampora lives in Westchester County, New York.


Natalie Scenters-ZapicoNatalie Scenters-Zapico

Poetry Reading
Thursday, April 6, 2017, 5:10 p.m.
Wendell Will Room

Natalie Scenters-Zapico is the author of The Verging Cities, which won the GLCA New Writers Award for Poetry (2016), 2015 NACCS Tejas FOCO Book Award, and 2016 Utah Book Award in poetry. The poetry collection was also named a Must-Read Debut by LitHub and listed as a top ten debut of 2015 by Poets and Writers. Her poems have appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as American Poets, The Believer, Prairie Schooner, West Branch, and Best American Poetry 2015. A Canto Mundo fellow, Natalie Scenters-Zapico is from the sister cities of El Paso, Texas, U.S.A. and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, México. She lives in Salt Lake City. For more information, visit her at https://nataliescenterszapico.com/.

BOC Pass Rate

Fields2014-20152015-20162016-20173 yr aggregate
Number of students graduating from program. 2 3 8 13
Number of students graduating from program who took examination. 2 2 7 11
Number of students who passed the examination on the first attempt. 2 2 5 9
Percentage of students who passed the examination on the first attempt. 100 100 71 82
Number of students who passed the examination regardless of the number of attempts. 2 2 5 9
Percentage of students who passed the examination regardless of the number of attempts. 100 100 71 82

Wesley Dick

DickW 0228 crop

Professor
U. S. History

Office: Robinson Hall 213
Phone: 517/629-0348
Email:

 

Education

  • Whitman College, B.A., history (1961)
  • University of Washington, M.A., history (1965)
  • University of Washington, Ph.D., history 1973

Teaching Experience:

  • University of Washington, 1961-1968
  • Albion College, 1968-Present

COURSES TAUGHT IN RECENT PAST
  • American Dreams & Realities
  • A Sense of Place: Albion & the American Dream
  • U.S. History Since 1877
  • America in Crisis: Great Depression, World War II, & Cold War
  • 1960s
  • Environmental History

ACADEMIC AWARDS
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • Summa Cum Laude
  • Phi Alpha Theta
  • Ford Foundation Cooperative Teaching Fellowship (1960-2)
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar Fellowships
  • (1973) (1977) (1984) (1988)
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute Fellowship (1998)
  • Council on International Educational Exchange Environmental Program, China (1999)
  • U.S. Department of Energy Summer Seminar Fellowships (1978) (1979) (1980)
  • American Historical Association/American Political Science Association Fellowship (1983)
  • Albion College Students’ Choice Award (1997)
  • Albion College Arthur Anderson Teacher of the Year Award (1997)
  • Albion College Richard Baird Excellence in Teaching Award (2000)
  • Designer of National Conference for Undergraduate Research (NCUR) Grant for Interdisciplinary
  • study of the community of Albion, Michigan—awarded for 2003-2004; renewed for 2004-2005.
  • Director, (NCUR)/Lancy Initiative Grant (2003-2005)

COMMUNITY & SERVICE AWARDS
  • Albion College Black Student Alliance Kwanzaa Committee Community Contribution Award (2011)
  • Inductee, Albion Multicultural Hall of Fame (2009)
  • NAACP Community Service Award for contributions to the goal of “equality and justice for all by
  • precept and example” (1988)
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Leadership Award for “commitment to making Dr. King’s Dream a reality”
  • (Albion Kwanzaa Youth Group) (1997)
  • Recognition “for commitment to the youth of Albion” by Albion Minority Program Services (1997)
  • Faculty Award: Michigan Campus Compact “in recognition of Outstanding Contributions to Community
  • Service Learning at Albion College” (2003)
  • NAACP President’s Award in recognition of “outstanding service and commitment to Human and Civil
  • Rights” (2004)

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
  • 2013: “America in Search of its Conscience: History & Hope,” presentation for the Albion
  • community sponsored by the Albion Historical Society on participation in the 50th Anniversary
  • Commemoration of the March on Washington.
  • 2013: Participant at August 24th Commemorative March for the 50th Anniversary of the March on
  • Washington and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have A Dream Speech.”
  • 2013: Participant as representative of Albion Branch, NAACP at 50th Anniversary of Martin Luther
  • King, Jr.’s march and speech in Detroit—commemorative march and symposium.
  • 2013: Participant at Newseum, Washington, D.C. symposium commemorating 50th anniversary of the
  • assassination of Medgar Evers, featuring Myrlie Evers-Williams, Julian Bond, & Gwen Ifill (PBS).
  • 2013: Participant at Kent State symposium, march, and vigil, commemorating May 4, 1970.
  • 2013: Coordinated visit of MLK Convocation keynote speaker and Coy James Memorial lecturer, Dr.
  • Cleveland Sellers.
  • 2013: Coordinator and discussion leader for Black History Month film, “Scarred Justice: The
  • Orangeburg Massacre, 1968.”
  • 2013: Participant, “Civil Rights South: In the Footsteps,” tour directed by Julian Bond.
  • 2013: Faculty Mentor for Center for Sustainability and Environment trip to New Mexico (May).
  • 2012: Invited as liaison for Judge Damon Keith, fall convocation speaker.
  • 2012: Invited speaker as part of Albion Branch, NAACP, for Black History Month at Coldwater State
  • Reformatory.
  • 2012: Coordinator and Discussion leader for Black History Month film, “Freedom Riders.”
  • 2012: Faculty Mentor, Center for Sustainability and the Environment trip to South Carolina.
  • 2012: Coordinator for Albion College CSE students and faculty seminar with President Cleveland
  • Sellers at Voorhees College, Denmark, South Carolina.
  • 2012: Participant, “Civil Rights South: In the Footsteps of the Movement,” with Julian Bond.
  • 2012: Participant at “Malcolm X” forum at the Charles Wright African American History Museum.
  • 2012: Delegate to Michigan State NAACP Convention, Detroit.
  • 2011: Invited to give the Coy James Memorial Lecture, “Albion & the American Dream.”
  • 2011: Keynote co-speaker with Robert Wall for MLK Convocation: “In the Footsteps of Dr. Martin
  • Luther King, Jr.”
  • 2011: Invited to introduce Daoud Lecture, Steven Solomon, author of Water, The Epic Struggle for
  • Wealth, Power, and Civilization.
  • 2011: Coordinated Coy James Lecture with Phillip Mason, “Rum Running and the Roaring Twenties:
  • Michigan and Prohibition.”
  • 2011: Albion College Faculty Lecture: “Albion & the American Dream.”
  • 2011: “Civil Rights South: In the Footsteps of the Movement,” Civil Rights tour with Julian
  • Bond.
  • 2011: Faculty Mentor for the Center for Sustainability and the Environment trip to Louisiana.
  • 2011: Albion Branch representative to NAACP conference on “Environmental Justice,” Detroit.
  • 2010: Participant, “Race to the South: From the Klan to Katrina,” Civil Rights tour with Julian
  • Bond.
  • 2010: Faculty Mentor for Environmental Institute to Oregon and Washington.
  • 2010: MLK Convocation Committee, featured speaker: Dr. Clayborne Carson, editor of the MLK
  • papers.
  • 2009: Witness to History: Participant, Inauguration of President Barack Obama.
  • 2009: Faculty Mentor, Environmental Institute trip: “California: Imperial Valley, Salto Sea,
  • Imperial Valley, Joshua Tree.”
  • 2009: “Following in the Footsteps: Civil Rights Tour with Julian Bond.”
  • 2009: Participant: NAACP Centennial Convention, New York City.
  • 2009: Invited by the Elkin Isaac Honors Symposium to introduce James Gignac (Sierra Club), as
  • the Alumni Speaker.
  • 2009: Coordinated Washington, D.C. First-Year Seminar trip with World War II theme—World War II
  • Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Museum of American History, U.S. Holocaust Museum,
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial.
  • 2009: Wrote columns for the Albion Branch NAACP Newsletter: “Making History: Campaigning for
  • Barack Obama in Albion, Michigan”; “New York City: The NAACP & Dorothy Height—Long Distance
  • Runner.”
  • 2009: Wrote “Brief History of Albion NAACP” for annual Freedom Fund Banquet.
  • 2009: Sabbatical, spring semester: “Albion, Michigan Goes to War.”
  • 2008: Appointed by Albion College President to committee for designing and implementing Albion
  • College Sustainability Initiative
  • 2008: “Civil Rights South: In the Footsteps of the Movement.” (Civil Rights tour of Georgia and
  • Alabama with Julian Bond, Professor History, U. of Virginia, civil rights pioneer, NAACP
  • Chairman)
  • 2008: Faculty mentor for environmental trip with students and faculty to Florida Everglades
  • (Albion College Environmental Institute)
  • 2007: Participant, conference on “Environmental Justice and Diversity,” University of Michigan
  • 2007: Faculty mentor for environmental trip with students and faculty to Chesapeake Bay
  • Watershed
  • 2006: Faculty mentor for environmental trip with students and faculty to Appalachia (Smoky
  • Mountain National Park, TVA, Oakridge National Laboratory, and mountain-top removal site.
  • 2005: Published with co-author Jennifer Cook, “A Window on America: Bringing Home
  • Interdisciplinary Research” in CUR QUARTERLY (cover article)
  • 2005: Presentation with Leslie Dick, “A Sense of Place: Albion & the American Dream” to Michigan
  • Archivists Association Conference for session entitled “History in the Classroom: Fostering
  • Relationships Between Students and Archives.”
  • 2005: Faculty mentor for environment trip with students and faculty to California (Yosemite
  • National Park, Hetch Hetchy, Mono Lake, Central Valley, Steinbeck Museum, Monterrey Bay, and Big
  • Sur)
  • 2005: Directed NCUR/Lancy student scholars who presented at National Conference for
  • Undergraduate Research in Lexington, Virginia
  • 2004: Directed 10-Week Summer (NCUR/Lancy) Interdisciplinary Seminar: “Boom, Bust, Recovery:
  • Explorations of Albion, Michigan—the Last Fifty Years.”
  • 2004: Coordinated & mentored NCUR/Lancy scholars who presented at National Conference for
  • Undergraduate Research in Indianapolis.
  • 2004: Faculty mentor for environmental trip with students and faculty to Louisiana (New Orleans
  • and the Gulf)
  • 2003: Directed 10-Week Summer (NCUR/Lancy) Interdisciplinary Seminar: “Boom, Bust, Recovery:
  • Explorations of Albion, Michigan—the Last Fifty Years.”
  • 2003: Faculty Mentor for environmental trip with students and faculty to Chesapeake Bay
  • Watershed (Amish farms, Three Mile Island, Susquehanna River, and Eastern Shore)
  • 2003: Individual travel to Japan to visit Hiroshima and Nagasaki Peace Memorials & Museums
  • 2002: Faculty mentor for environmental trip with students and faculty to Southwest: Nevada, Utah,
  • Arizona (Yucca Mountain nuclear burial site, Zion, Grand Canyon, Glen Canyon, Hoover Dam)
  • 2001: Member of Albion College team participating in: “The Greening of the Campus” conference,
  • Ball State U., Muncie, Indiana
  • 2001: Faculty mentor for environmental trip with students and faculty to Pacific Northwest
  • (Olympic National Park, Mt. Rainier, Grand Coulee Dam, Columbia River, Hanford Atomic
  • Reservation)
  • 2000: Coordinator for Albion College Symposium: “Environmental Activism for the New Millennium”
  • in honor of the 30th anniversary of Earth Day. (Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. keynote speaker)
  • 2000: Faculty mentor for environmental trip with students and faculty to Florida (Florida Keys,
  • Everglades, Florida Coast)
  • 1999: Member of Albion College team participating in: “The Greening of the Campus” conference at
  • Ball State University
  • 1999: Participant, Orion Society National Conference on Community Based Environmental Action,
  • National Conservation Training Center at Shepardstown, West Virginia.
  • 1999: Delegate to Chinese Environmental Conference with focus on the Three Gorges Dam Project on
  • the Yangtze River arranged through the Council for International Education Exchange in
  • cooperation with the Chinese Environmental Protection Agency
  • 1998: Fellow, NEH Summer Institute: “Environmental History and World History, 1500-2000,” U. of
  • California, Santa Cruz
  • 1998: Participant, “Green & Gold: California History Conference,” U. of California, Santa Cruz
  • 1996: Participant, “Watershed: Writers, Nature, and Community,” Washington, D.C. (sponsored by
  • the Orion Society, the Library of Congress, and Poet Laureate Robert Hass.)
  • 1994: Presented paper, “Dammed Salmon: Economy, Equity, Ecology, and Columbia River Dams in the
  • 1930s,” to conference on Power and Place in the North American West, Third Annual Symposium of
  • the Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest, University of Washington, Seattle.
  • 1994: Presented Commentator’s paper, “Resource Utilization Through History,” to “The Environment
  • Through World History” program for the World History Association Annual Meeting, Aspen Insitute,
  • Aspen, Colorado
  • 1990: Published “When Dams Weren’t Damned: The Public Power Crusade and Visions of the Good
  • Life in the Pacific Northwest in the 1930s” in Environmental Review
  • 1990: “Declaration of Interdependence,” Earth Week Symposium featuring David Brower
  • 1990: Hosted Cesar Chavez on campus for program on Farm Workers, Pesticides, and Social Justice,
  • including a viewing of the film, “The Wrath of Grapes.”
  • 1989: Chaired Workshop on “The Columbia and the Music of Woody Guthrie,” the classic documentary
  • film, American Society for Environmental History meeting, Evergreen State College
  • 1988: Delegate, “North American Bio-regional Congress,” British Columbia, Canada
  • 1988: Fellow, NEH Seminar, “The American West: Environment & History,” directed by Donald
  • Worster at the Mountain West Center for Historical Studies at Utah State University
  • 1986: Delegate to “Fate of the Earth Conference,” coordinated by David Brower (Ottawa, Canada)
  • 1986: Coordinated “A Declaration of Interdependence: Society, Environment, and the Land Ethic,”
  • A Symposium in honor of the Aldo Leopold Centennial (Gaylord Nelson, keynote speaker)
  • 1984: Delegate to “Fate of the Earth Conference,” Washington, D.C.
  • 1984: Fellow, NEH Seminar, “The Frontier & the Environment,” Indiana University
  • 1983: Participant, “Appalachian Life & Culture,” featuring Harry Caudill, author of Night Comes
  • to the Cumberlands and My Land Is Dying, Hindman Settlement School, Kentucky
  • 1982: Participant, “Energy Futures, Energy Implications,” National Science Foundation Chautauqua
  • Short Course with Amory and Hunter Lovins at the University of Iowa
  • 1982: Delegate, “Fate of the Earth Conference,” inspired by David Brower, linking environmental,
  • peace, and social justice groups at Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York City
  • 1980: Participant, “Energy Policy in the Southwest and the Native American,” USDOE Institute,
  • University of San Diego
  • 1978: Participant, “Indians and Ecology, “NSF Chautauqua Short Course with Clara Sue Kidwell,
  • MSU
  • 1978: Participant, “Energy, Conservation, & Public Health,” USDOE Seminar at Harvard School of
  • Public Health, Boston
  • 1977: Fellow, “American West: New Trends in Historical Interpretation,” NEH Summer Seminar, U. of
  • California, Davis.
  • 1973: Fellow, “Literature and the American West,” NEH Summer Seminar, U. of Oregon
  • 1973: “Visions of Abundance: The Public Power Crusade in the Pacific Northwest in the Era of
  • J.D. Ross and the New Deal,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington

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Elkin Isaac Symposium Programs

Program Resources

CELLS alive!

A visual tour of cells, bacteria, viruses and their interaction with one another.

A Gene Map of the Human Genome

The Human Genome Project is expected to produce a sequence of DNA representing the functional blueprint and evolutionary history of the human species. However, only about 3% of this sequence is thought to specify the portions of our 50,000 to 100,000 genes that encode proteins.

UCMP Phylogeny Wing: The Phylogeny of Life

Life! It's everywhere on Earth; you can find living organisms from the poles to the equator, from the bottom of the sea to several miles in the air, from freezing waters to dry valleys to undersea thermal vents to groundwater thousands of feet below the Earth's surface.

Microbe Zoo

A digital earning center for microbial ecology.

National Center for Biotechnology Information

The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

Monica Shuk, '19

ShukM65x91

Monica Shuk, '19, is an accounting - C.P.A. emphasis major. She is part of the Gerstacker Institute and record holder as a player on the Albion College Volleyball Team. Monica was awarded the Tim Cash, Ernst & Young scholarship as an accounting major in the Economics and Management department. She completed two accounting internships with Jacobs Engineering during the summers of 2016 and 2017. These internships provided Monica an opportunity to see what accounting is like on a multinational level, while expanding her skills beyond just accounting. Monica will be interning the summer of 2018 with Ernst & Young. Upon graduation, she hopes to receive full time employment with Ernst & Young, while furthering her knowledge as she prepares to take the C.P.A. exam. “I love Albion because of the well-rounded person I have become. I have gained so much knowledge while being part of a team and a well-known business institute. These experiences have helped me learn how to hold everyone accountable, as well as to inspire others.”

Patrick Wagner

PatrickWagnerlarge

My interest in engineering started when…

I was in high school. I was interested in math and physics, and my family suggested that I give engineering a try. Once I started the Pre-Engineering Program at Albion, I really liked it and found the work to be satisfying.

The professors at Albion are great at…

Expanding the horizon of engineering, math and physics in their classes. They did this by not just talking about theoretical situations, but practical situations too. Because of the small class sizes, I was able to get to know my professors and ask a lot of questions.

On transferring to the University of Michigan - Dearborn

I'm extremely happy with how well Albion prepared me for engineering school. While part of the program at Albion, I took more upper level math and physics classes than was required because these subjects were interesting and fun. Once I transferred to the University of Michigan, everyone started asking me for help in their calculus and physics classes. I made the Dean's list both semesters of my first year there.

My role as an intern at DENSO International America, Inc. involves...

Working in the Engine Management Systems and Components Group 6. We develop and sell different types of sensors found in an engine, with the ultimate goal of getting our sensors purchased by companies like GM, Ford and Chrysler. I'm also working on benchmarking, which involves comparing our sensors to those made by our competitors in order to determine our strengths and weaknesses. I get to tear apart the sensors and figure out how they work, so it's very hands-on and the process is really exciting. It's fun to discover something new everyday.

My Albion experience was invaluable because...

I learned how to be more than just an electrical engineer. I learned how to be an engineer that communicates well with others and who isn't afraid to do something because it seems too difficult. I learned this by being president of the canoe club, captain of the swim team, and community service chairman of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. These positions gave me skills that are essential to being a good engineer. If it wasn't for Albion, I don't know where I would be.

Moore Math Marathon

Friday, May 12, 2017; 9:00 a.m.

The Albion College mathematics department is pleased to host the Moore Math Marathon, a mathematics competition for teams of ninth and tenth students. It consists of three team and one individual competition. All secondary schools in Michigan are encouraged to send a team with a teacher advisor.

Register Now

Event Descriptions

The Moore Math Marathon Competition teams will consist of 4 students, at least one of whom must be a 9th grader. Each team will be accompanied by a math teacher/coach who will serve as a proctor for another team throughout the day. The competition includes both individual and team events, concluding with a mathematical scavenger hunt around the Albion campus.

  1. Solo Challenge: This event is a 40 question multiple choice test and lasts 45 minutes. The material on the test comes from the Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II curriculum along with other mathematics topics. Students need to work quickly and carefully. The score is the number correct. The scores of all team members are averaged for a team score in the event.

  2. Team Theme: The entire team works together to explore a mathematical topic, guided by a series of questions. At the end of fifty minutes, the team turns in one answer to each question. Each answer is written in the form of an essay. Answers will be judged on mathematical content, grammar, and the style in which they are written.

  3. Triple Play: Each team is assigned a room with a blackboard and given fifteen minutes to solve three problems. Team members need to work together and check each other's work to solve the problems. The score is the number correct.
  4. Pony Express: Each team member is given a problem requiring for its complete solution the answer to another member's problem. Answers are passed from one member to the next, with the anchor person handing answers to the team's proctor. Only the answer handed in is considered, and points are awarded for correct answers based on the elapsed time. There are four relays.

  5. Campus Coordinates: This final event is a scavenger hunt around the Albion campus. Students will work as a team to solve problems whose answers will direct them to specific rooms or buildings around the central campus. At each location, students will obtain a specified item, such as the signature of a faculty member or competition representative. The score is based on the number of required items obtained in the 35 minute time period. This event is not included in the score for the awards, but will receive a separate prize.

Event Schedule

Time Event
9:00 - 9:30 a.m. Registration
Location: Norris Lobby
9:30 - 9:45 a.m. Welcome Ceremony
Location: Norris Auditorium
9:50 - 10:15 a.m. Advisor's Meeting
Location: Norris 100
9:50 - 10:35 a.m. Solo Challenge
Location: Norris Auditorium
10:40 - 11:30 a.m. Team Theme
11:35 - 11:50 a.m. Triple Play
12:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Lunch
Location: Baldwin
12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Special Topic Exploration
Location: Science Center Atrium
1:00 - 1:20 p.m. Pony Express
1:25 - 2:00 p.m. Campus Coordinates
2:00 - 2:30 p.m. Award Ceremony
Location: Norris Auditorium

Contestant Instructions

No calculators can be used in any contest. No notes or other materials can be used. Cell phones and other electronic devices are prohibited. Bring pencils for your own use.

Solo Challenge

Each multiple choice question on this test has five possible answers. Choose the single best answer for each question. You are not expected to be able to completely solve each problem in the time allotted. However, because the score is the number correct, be sure to select an answer for every question.

pdfSolo Challange Sample Questions

Team Theme

  1. Your team has 50 minutes to answer a series of questions asking you to explore a topic.
  2. Your team must turn in at most one answer to each question. The answers must be numbered and written in order, but you may skip problems if you choose. Number the pages you turn in.
  3. Your answers will be judged on the clarity and correctness of the writing style as well as on mathematical correctness.
  4. Organize your team and time in any way you decide is best. Only team members may be in the room during the essay. You may not bring any notes, books or calculators into the room.
  5. A proctor will be just outside the room and will warn you 10 minutes before your time is up. Give your answer sheets to the proctor at the end of the period to place in the inner envelope. Clean up all scratch paper.

pdfTeam Theme Sample Questions

Triple Play

Your team has 15 minutes to solve 3 problems. You may organize your team effort any way you like. Nobody but team members may be in the classroom during the event. Write your team's answers on the answer sheet provided. All answers must be simplified. A proctor will get you started and will give you a 2-minute warning. Give only the answer sheet to the proctor at the end of the 15 minutes. Clean up all scratch paper. No calculators, notes, or books are allowed.

pdfTriple Play Sample Questions

Pony Express

  1. The contest consists of four relays. Team members sit one behind the other. Only a freshman may sit in the second position. Teams may change seating arrangements between relays as long as the second person in line is always a freshman. Teams with fewer than four members can participate by consulting the person in charge of the relay room.
  2. Each chair will have scratch paper and 2 x 2 answer slips. In each relay, the answer slips are plain paper for seats 1 - 3 and printed for seat 4.
  3. The proctors will distribute the four problems face down, one to each member. When the signal is given, all contestants may begin work. It is good for contestants to work on their problems even while waiting to receive answers. No calculators, notes, or books are allowed.
  4. In each relay, only the first problem may be completely solved as given; to solve the others you need a number which is the answer to the problem of the team member in front of you. When you have solved your problem, write the answer, and only the answer on a 2 x 2 slip provided and pass it to the person behind you. The fourth member will write the final answer, the school name and the time interval on the printed form and hand it to the proctor.
  5. Team members may communicate in the direction answers are passed only by writing answers on blank slips. A team member may communicate in the other direction only by tapping the shoulder or desk of a person who handed him/her an answer in order to indicate that there is a problem with the answer received.
  6. Each relay has three time periods ending after 2, 3, and 4 minutes. Warnings are given 10 seconds before the end of each period. The final person on a team may hand the proctor only one answer per time period and should wait until the final 10 seconds of the period to do so. Other team members may pass answers along at any time.
  7. Only the last answer that a team hands in during a relay is graded. Points are given for correct answers based on the time interval in which they were handed in. All answers must be simplified, and any fractions must be written in lowest terms.

pdfPony Express Sample Questions

Proctors’ Instructions

Each team advisor proctors another team in the Team Theme, Triple Play, and Relay competitions. Proctoring instructions for these events follow. Please remind students that they cannot use calculators, cell phones, notes or other materials in any contest. Students should bring their own pencils. Please bring a watch that marks seconds for your own use. The proctoring materials you need will be handed out at an advisors' meeting in the morning, where you can raise any questions or concerns you may have.

Team Theme

The room number where you will proctor the theme is listed in the program and marked on the envelope you will receive at the advisors' meeting. Make sure no books, calculators, cell phones, or other materials are in the room. Do not open the Theme envelope until the students are ready to begin. An extra copy of the Theme is included for you to keep and look over as you wish. Distribute the questions and the tablet of paper on which the answers are to be written. Teams should identify each page to be graded with their school name. The Theme lasts 50 minutes. Remain near but outside the room throughout the event. Inform the team when they have 10 minutes remaining. At the end of the 50 minutes collect and put all (and only) the answer pages inside thesmall envelope. Put the small envelope and remaining paper inside the large envelope. Keep the large envelope and start the Triple Play in the same room. A Marathon volunteer will come by to pick up the Theme envelope.

Triple Play

Do not open the Triple Play envelope until it is time to begin. Make sure that no books, calculators, cell phones, or other materials are in the room.

Distribute the question sheet, answer sheet, and paper. Keep a copy of the problems for your solving pleasure.

The Triple Play lasts only 15 minutes. Remain near but outside the room throughout the Huddle. Inform the team when they have 2 minutes remaining.

At the end of the 15 minutes, collect the answer sheet and scratch paper and put them inside the envelope.

Take the envelope with you and go to Baldwin for lunch. A Marathon volunteer will be there to pick up the Triple Play envelope.

Pony Express

Check your schedule on the program. Both the team that you advise and the team you proctor will be in the same room. Five minutes before the start of the pony express, take your team to the room and check the Pony Express Seating Chart posted. The name of the school will also be taped to the first chair of the corresponding row. Check that the second position in the row is taken by a freshman or sophomore.

The room monitor will go over the rules and answer questions before starting the event. Be sure that the students you are monitoring do not have books, calculators, or other materials. The monitor will then give you the pony express question cards.

When distributing the question cards, be sure that the first question is given face down to the first person, the second question to the second person, etc.

Slips are passed from front to back on each of the four rounds. Nothing but answers may be written on slips that are passed. Ensure that the only communication among teammates is a student tapping the shoulder or desk of the student who gave him/her an answer to indicate that there may be a problem with the answer.

Each round has three time periods, which end 2, 3 and 4 minutes after the start. Warnings are given 10 seconds before the end of each period. The final student in each team may hand the proctor only one answer per time period and should wait until the final 10 seconds of the period to do so.

The final student on each round will hand answers to you on printed forms. Only the last answer form submitted by a team is to be counted. As soon as you receive an answer slip for a time period, tear up any answer slip from a previous time period. Be certain that the team school name, answer, and time submitted are on each answer form.

When the correct answer is announced after the round, mark the score as indicated on the form, based on the answer's correctness and the time submitted. Record the score on the score sheet at the front of the room, and hand the answer form to the room monitor.

Registration

To indicate your attendance, please register online by Monday, April 10.

Register Now

Dr. Matthew Kay

An innovative and versatile performer, composer, and teacher, Matthew Kay has played around the world with some of the world's finest musicians. With a desire to engage audiences with a unique experience, Matthew's performances span a diverse range of genres such as traditional british brass band music, classical music, electronica, jazz, gospel, and Roma gypsy music.

Matthew has played with the Grand Rapids Symphony Orchestra, the Lansing Symphony Orchestra, the Lansing Symphony Big Band and the Southern Tier Orchestra. In 1998, he became the British Cornet Champion, shortly after joining the world-renowned Yorkshire Building Society Band. During his seven years with the band, they became widely regarded as the best brass band in the world winning the European Brass Band Championships a record six times, touring Europe and Australia, and recorded several internationally acclaimed CDs.

Matthew has a doctorate in trumpet performance at Michigan State University. He is the founder of Slavistar, a Roma gypsy style band, which blends traditional Eastern European folk tunes with jazz, funk and soul.

 

Briton Path Academic Coaches '16-'17

  • Kalli Allen

    Kalli Allen

    Hometown: Cleveland, OH
    Major: Ethnic Studies

    Words to live by:
    "How you gon' win if you ain't right within?"
    -Lauryn Hill, Doo Wop (That Thing)

  • Julie Armitage

    Julie Armitage

    Hometown: Canton, MI
    Major: Biology

    Words to live by:
    Inch by inch life's a sinch, yard by yard life is hard.

  • Becca Barry

    Becca Barry

    Hometown: Manistee, MI
    Major: Business & Communication

    Words to live by:
    Life will take you everywhere you need to go.

  • Cam Clements

    Cam Clements

    Hometown: Birmingham, MI
    Major: Biology / Management

    Words to live by:
    The problem isn't the problem, the problem is your attitude about the problem.

  • Lauren Cook

    Lauren Cook

    Hometown: Milan, MI
    Major: Athletic Training / Psychology

    Words to live by:
    No matter what the weather, always bring your own sunshine!

  • Alexis Garza

    Alexis Garza

    Hometown: Saginaw, MI
    Major: Ethnic Studies & History / Religious Studies

    Words to live by:
    Durning your life, never stop dreaming. No one can take away your dreams.
    -Tupac Shakur

  • Kendra Gembala

    Kendra Gembala

    Hometown: Cedar Lake, TN
    Major: Finance & Public Policy

    Words to live by:
    Nothing worth achieving is ever easy.

  • Lauren Kelsey

    Lauren Kelsey

    Hometown: Sanford, MI
    Major: Biochemistry / Molecular Biology

    Words to live by:
    Passion will move you beyond all your shortcomings and failures.

  • Julia Malecke

    Julia Malecke

    Hometown: South Lyon, MI
    Major: Business & Communications

    Words to live by:
    Never give up. Keep perservering no matter what.

  • Jake Neracher

    Jake Neracher

    Hometown: Wixom, MI
    Major: Communication / Management

    Words to live by:
    Keep yourself in the moment. Smile.

  • Kelly Wright

    Kelly Wright

    Hometown: Northville, MI
    Major: Athletic Trainer / Spanish

    Words to live by:
    Every day may not be good, but there is something good in every day.

  • Jared Yaroch

    Jared Yaroch

    Hometown: Clarkston, MI
    Major: Commnication / Exercise Science

    Words to live by:
    Stay focused.

  • Jamal Yearwood

    Jamal Yearwood

    Hometown: Saginaw, MI
    Major: Spanish / Management

    Words to live by:
    Above all be genuine to yourself.

Submit Your Activities

Please share your reflections with us about how you have found meaning in your experiences both on and off campus. There are no right or wrong answers, but reflections are expected to be a minimum of 200 words and need to reflect depth of thought and introspection. Reflections also need to be presented in a professional manner with no grammatical errors.

Some questions you can answer in your reflection are:

  • What was your mindset going into the experience and how did it change after?
  • How can you apply what you learned in a professional setting?
  • In what way did this experience help shape you into who you are today?
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2015-16 Academic Year Colloquium Schedule

September 10, 2015

Title: Counting Without Seeing
Speaker: Eric Kamischke
Mathematics & Engineering
Jackson College
Jackson, MI

Abstract: The National Park Service asked for an estimate of the number of elk taken by the wolves introduced to the park.  As there was no method guaranteed to find all the kills in the wilds of the park, a design was created to estimate what was not seen. The estimate involved a double count procedure, logistic regression modeling and parameter approximation. Once the estimate was found, the search and verification of the standard error involved delta methods, bootstrapping and simulation.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

September 17, 2015

Title: Planning for Gradute Study in Mathemaitics and Computer Science
Speaker:  David A. Reimann, Professor Albion College
Abstract:  A degree in mathematics or computer science is excellent preparation for graduate school in areas such as mathematics, statistics, computer science, engineering, finance, and law.  Come learn about graduate school and options you will have to further your education after graduation.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

September 24, 2015

Title: The Mathematical Connection between Patterns in Moorish Architecture and the Artwork of M.C. Escher
Speaker:  David A. Reimann, Professor Albion College
Abstract:  The Mathematical structure of symmetrical patterns can be studied using group theory. The Moors built many magnificent buildings richly decorated with geometic patterns during their rule of the Iberian peninsula (711-1492). The graphic artist M.C. Escher visited southern Spain in 1922 amd was capitivated by the patterns that richly decorate the archtecture of the Alhambra, Alcazar, and other Moorish building. After a second visit to Spain in 1935, Escher became obsessed with creating patterns of interlocking figures based on these elaborate tiling patterns. While Escher had no formal mathematical training, he used mathematical methods grounded in scientific literature to study these patterns. We will view these patterns through the lens of group theory, one of the great mathematical accomplishments of the 19th century. This talk will be highly visual with many pictures of Escher's work and Moorish architecture.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 1, 2015

Title: Finding the Best Way From Here to There - A Primer on Variational Calculus
Speaker:  Darren Mason, Professor Albion College
Abstract:  

Given a task to accomplish, it is natural to ask what is the best way to achieve your goal? Maybe you are flying from Beijing to London and need the shortest flight path. Or you are selling fuel and you want to find the optimal time t to sell it so that you can maximize your profit. Or you are crossing a river with a strong current and want to determine a propeller direction (as a function of time) so that you cross the river in the least amount of time. The number of possible questions of this type seems endless. During this lecture we will discuss some of the above problems, a famous brain-teaser called the brachistochrone problem, and illustrate how to find solutions to these problems using a version of calculus that makes sense in infinite dimensions — the interesting field of variational calculus!

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 8, 2015

Title: Spider Craps: Mathematical Development of the New Casino Games
Speaker:  Dr. Mark Bollman, Professor Albion College
Abstract:

Games of chance have been found in the relics of ancient cultures for as far back as one cares to look. The popular game of craps, played with two six-sided dice, traces its origins to the Old English game of Hazard, which was then transplanted to New Orleans by French settlers and evolved into one of the most popular casino table games. This talk will describe research in both theoretical and experimental probability that modified craps to use eight-sided dice, leading to the invention of a new game called "Spider Craps". Mathematical points of interest for casino game developers including reasonable win probabilities, a meaningful house advantage, and efficient gameplay will be described. This research was carried out under a grant from Albion College's Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (FURSCA) with recent Albion alumnus Jacob Engel.

 
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 15, 2015

Title: Pizza and Pamphlets
Speaker:  Bring your friends, bring your questions; bring your schedule!
Abstract:  

Pizza and Pamphlets is the event where the Mathematics and Computer Science Department provides information about spring courses in Mathematics and Computer Science. All Math majors/minors, Computer Science minors, Math/Physics majors, Math/Econ majors, prospective majors, and friends of the department are invited to join us.

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 22, 2015

Title: Building Better Biological Models
 Speaker:  Elizabeth Skubak Wolf, Assistant Professor
Abstract:  

Randomness is inherent in many biological processes, from the dynamics of the populations in an ecosystem down to the systems of biochemical reactions occurring within a single cell. Therefore, when trying to analyze these processes, we might consider using a stochastic model — that is, one that includes some form of randomness.

Can stochastic models behave significantly differently from deterministic models? (Yes!) What might a stochastic model look like? How exactly does one use a stochastic model to say anything useful? We'll look at a few biological examples, introduce a particular stochastic model called a Markov chain, and see how, using a tool called Monte Carlo simulation, we can gain some insight into the biological systems we model.

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 29, 2015

Title: The weak cop number of a graph
Speaker:  Robert Bell
The weak cop number of an infinite graph
Lyman Briggs College & Department of Mathematics
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
Abstract:  The cop number of a finite graph G is defined as the minimal number of cops a player needs to capture an opponent's robber in a game of cops and robbers on G. In this game, the cop player places each of her cop pawns on vertices of G; and then the opponent places his robber pawn on a vertex of G. Both players have complete information about G and the location of the pawns. The players alternate turns, with the cop player playing first, by moving any number of his or her pawns along edges of G to adjacent vertices. If a cop is moved to the same vertex as the robber, then the robber is captured. In this talk, we explore the notion of a weak cop number due to Florian Lehner. Suppose G is a possibly infinite graph. The weak cop number of G is the minimal number of cops needed to either capture the robber or prevent the robber from visiting any vertex of G infinitely often. We compute the weak cop numbers of several families of infinite graphs, extend several theorems to this new setting, and give examples of how some of the foundational theorems for finite graphs fail to extend to infinite graphs. In particular, we will outline how one can bound the weak cop number of a connected, countable, locally finite planar graph. This is joint work with undergraduate participants in the 2015 summer REU program at MSU.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

November 5, 2015

Title: Random Chess: Piece Strength; End Games; and Large Sparse Eigenvalue Problems
Speaker:  Allan Struthers, Professor Mathematical Sciences, Michigan Technological University
Abstract:  Chess books all include an assessment of the relative strength of pieces and a detailed analysis of various end game situations. Modern computer algebra systems make it easy to build transition matrices for random walks by various pieces on chess boards. The eigenvectors of these large sparse matrices quantify piece strength and provide interesting end-game information. The talk will provide all necessary background in both Chess and Linear Algebra.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

November 12, 2015

Title:

Two-Colored Motzkin Paths, Set Partitions and Restricted Growth Functions 

Speaker:  

Samantha Dahlberg, Mathematics - Michigan State University

Abstract:  

This talk is based on the research done with a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) group at Michigan State University in the summer of 2014. The goal of this talk is to first introduce three commonly studied objects in combinatorics: set partitions, restricted growth functions (RGFs) and two-colored Motzkin paths. We will introduce and explore these seemingly different objects, but we will find that they are actually closely related to each other. This is joint work with Robert Dorward, Jonathan Gerhard, Thomas Grubb, Carlin Purcell, Lindsey Reppuhn, and Bruce Sagan. 

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

November 19, 2015

Title: Tennis Rankings over Time
Speaker:  Michael A. Jones, Associate Editor Mathematical Reviews
Abstract:

In 2010, Kim Clijsters won the U.S. Open, but had her world ranking drop from #3 to #5 by the Women's Tennis Assocation (WTA). How can a tennis player win a tournament but drop in the rankings? The WTA uses a moving window to determine the rankings. We explain how discounting older results in the window can prevent such counterintuitive behavior and consider geometric and arithmetic discounting methods. We examine real data from the WTA, and comment on discounting methods already in use by the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) for ranking national teams for the World Cup and by the Professional Golf Association for ranking golfers. This talk is based on joint work with Alex Webb (undergraduate at Macalaster College) and Jennifer Wilson (Eugene Lang College, New School University).


 

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

2016-17 Academic Year Colloquium Schedule

September 10, 2015

Title: Counting Without Seeing
Speaker: Eric Kamischke
Mathematics & Engineering
Jackson College
Jackson, MI

Abstract: The National Park Service asked for an estimate of the number of elk taken by the wolves introduced to the park.  As there was no method guaranteed to find all the kills in the wilds of the park, a design was created to estimate what was not seen. The estimate involved a double count procedure, logistic regression modeling and parameter approximation. Once the estimate was found, the search and verification of the standard error involved delta methods, bootstrapping and simulation.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

September 17, 2015

Title: Planning for Gradute Study in Mathemaitics and Computer Science
Speaker:  David A. Reimann, Professor Albion College
Abstract:  A degree in mathematics or computer science is excellent preparation for graduate school in areas such as mathematics, statistics, computer science, engineering, finance, and law.  Come learn about graduate school and options you will have to further your education after graduation.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

September 24, 2015

Title: The Mathematical Connection between Patterns in Moorish Architecture and the Artwork of M.C. Escher
Speaker:  David A. Reimann, Professor Albion College
Abstract:  The Mathematical structure of symmetrical patterns can be studied using group theory. The Moors built many magnificent buildings richly decorated with geometic patterns during their rule of the Iberian peninsula (711-1492). The graphic artist M.C. Escher visited southern Spain in 1922 amd was capitivated by the patterns that richly decorate the archtecture of the Alhambra, Alcazar, and other Moorish building. After a second visit to Spain in 1935, Escher became obsessed with creating patterns of interlocking figures based on these elaborate tiling patterns. While Escher had no formal mathematical training, he used mathematical methods grounded in scientific literature to study these patterns. We will view these patterns through the lens of group theory, one of the great mathematical accomplishments of the 19th century. This talk will be highly visual with many pictures of Escher's work and Moorish architecture.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 1, 2015

Title: Finding the Best Way From Here to There - A Primer on Variational Calculus
Speaker:  Darren Mason, Professor Albion College
Abstract:  

Given a task to accomplish, it is natural to ask what is the best way to achieve your goal? Maybe you are flying from Beijing to London and need the shortest flight path. Or you are selling fuel and you want to find the optimal time t to sell it so that you can maximize your profit. Or you are crossing a river with a strong current and want to determine a propeller direction (as a function of time) so that you cross the river in the least amount of time. The number of possible questions of this type seems endless. During this lecture we will discuss some of the above problems, a famous brain-teaser called the brachistochrone problem, and illustrate how to find solutions to these problems using a version of calculus that makes sense in infinite dimensions — the interesting field of variational calculus!

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 8, 2015

Title: Spider Craps: Mathematical Development of the New Casino Games
Speaker:  Dr. Mark Bollman, Professor Albion College
Abstract:

Games of chance have been found in the relics of ancient cultures for as far back as one cares to look. The popular game of craps, played with two six-sided dice, traces its origins to the Old English game of Hazard, which was then transplanted to New Orleans by French settlers and evolved into one of the most popular casino table games. This talk will describe research in both theoretical and experimental probability that modified craps to use eight-sided dice, leading to the invention of a new game called "Spider Craps". Mathematical points of interest for casino game developers including reasonable win probabilities, a meaningful house advantage, and efficient gameplay will be described. This research was carried out under a grant from Albion College's Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (FURSCA) with recent Albion alumnus Jacob Engel.

 
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 15, 2015

Title: Pizza and Pamphlets
Speaker:  Bring your friends, bring your questions; bring your schedule!
Abstract:  

Pizza and Pamphlets is the event where the Mathematics and Computer Science Department provides information about spring courses in Mathematics and Computer Science. All Math majors/minors, Computer Science minors, Math/Physics majors, Math/Econ majors, prospective majors, and friends of the department are invited to join us.

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 22, 2015

Title: Building Better Biological Models
 Speaker:  Elizabeth Skubak Wolf, Assistant Professor
Abstract:  

Randomness is inherent in many biological processes, from the dynamics of the populations in an ecosystem down to the systems of biochemical reactions occurring within a single cell. Therefore, when trying to analyze these processes, we might consider using a stochastic model — that is, one that includes some form of randomness.

Can stochastic models behave significantly differently from deterministic models? (Yes!) What might a stochastic model look like? How exactly does one use a stochastic model to say anything useful? We'll look at a few biological examples, introduce a particular stochastic model called a Markov chain, and see how, using a tool called Monte Carlo simulation, we can gain some insight into the biological systems we model.

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

October 29, 2015

Title: The weak cop number of a graph
Speaker:  Robert Bell
The weak cop number of an infinite graph
Lyman Briggs College & Department of Mathematics
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
Abstract:  The cop number of a finite graph G is defined as the minimal number of cops a player needs to capture an opponent's robber in a game of cops and robbers on G. In this game, the cop player places each of her cop pawns on vertices of G; and then the opponent places his robber pawn on a vertex of G. Both players have complete information about G and the location of the pawns. The players alternate turns, with the cop player playing first, by moving any number of his or her pawns along edges of G to adjacent vertices. If a cop is moved to the same vertex as the robber, then the robber is captured. In this talk, we explore the notion of a weak cop number due to Florian Lehner. Suppose G is a possibly infinite graph. The weak cop number of G is the minimal number of cops needed to either capture the robber or prevent the robber from visiting any vertex of G infinitely often. We compute the weak cop numbers of several families of infinite graphs, extend several theorems to this new setting, and give examples of how some of the foundational theorems for finite graphs fail to extend to infinite graphs. In particular, we will outline how one can bound the weak cop number of a connected, countable, locally finite planar graph. This is joint work with undergraduate participants in the 2015 summer REU program at MSU.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

November 5, 2015

Title: Random Chess: Piece Strength; End Games; and Large Sparse Eigenvalue Problems
Speaker:  Allan Struthers, Professor Mathematical Sciences, Michigan Technological University
Abstract:  Chess books all include an assessment of the relative strength of pieces and a detailed analysis of various end game situations. Modern computer algebra systems make it easy to build transition matrices for random walks by various pieces on chess boards. The eigenvectors of these large sparse matrices quantify piece strength and provide interesting end-game information. The talk will provide all necessary background in both Chess and Linear Algebra.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

November 12, 2015

Title:

Two-Colored Motzkin Paths, Set Partitions and Restricted Growth Functions 

Speaker:  

Samantha Dahlberg, Mathematics - Michigan State University

Abstract:  

This talk is based on the research done with a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) group at Michigan State University in the summer of 2014. The goal of this talk is to first introduce three commonly studied objects in combinatorics: set partitions, restricted growth functions (RGFs) and two-colored Motzkin paths. We will introduce and explore these seemingly different objects, but we will find that they are actually closely related to each other. This is joint work with Robert Dorward, Jonathan Gerhard, Thomas Grubb, Carlin Purcell, Lindsey Reppuhn, and Bruce Sagan. 

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

November 19, 2015

Title: Tennis Rankings over Time
Speaker:  Michael A. Jones, Associate Editor Mathematical Reviews
Abstract:

In 2010, Kim Clijsters won the U.S. Open, but had her world ranking drop from #3 to #5 by the Women's Tennis Assocation (WTA). How can a tennis player win a tournament but drop in the rankings? The WTA uses a moving window to determine the rankings. We explain how discounting older results in the window can prevent such counterintuitive behavior and consider geometric and arithmetic discounting methods. We examine real data from the WTA, and comment on discounting methods already in use by the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) for ranking national teams for the World Cup and by the Professional Golf Association for ranking golfers. This talk is based on joint work with Alex Webb (undergraduate at Macalaster College) and Jennifer Wilson (Eugene Lang College, New School University).


 

Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Citation: BibTeX citation

Dwayne Kratt, '89

Dwayne Kratt, '89Senior Director of Government Relations,
Diageo

Faculty and Staff

Principal Investigator

Beth LincolnBeth Lincoln
Provost

Office: Palenske 120
Phone: 517/629-0331
Email:

Coordinator

Ronney Mourad, professor of religious studies and department chair at Albion CollegeRonney Mourad
Professor
Religious Studies

Office: 211 Vulgamore
Phone: 517/629-0354
Email:

Steering Committee

Lynne ChytiloLynne Chytilo
Professor
Art and Art History

Office: Bobbitt Visual Arts Center
Phone: 517/629-0373
Email:

gueninlellemourad2Dianne Guenin-Lelle
Professor of French
Modern Languages and Cultures

Office: 117 Vulgamore Hall
E-mail:
Phone: 517/629-0335

Allison Harnish, Anthropology/SociologyAllison Harnish
Assistant Professor
Anthropology

Office: Robinson 310
Phone: 517-629-0272
Email:

Beth LincolnBeth Lincoln
Provost

Office: Palenske 120
Phone: 517/629-0331
Email:

Ian MacInnes, Chair and Professor, English DepartmentIan MacInnes
Department Chair and Professor
English

Office: Vulgamore 311
Phone: 517/629-0259
Email:

Bindu Madhok, chair and professor, Albion College Philosophy DepartmentBindu Madhok
Department Chair and Professor
Philosophy

Office: Vulgamore Hall, Room 209
Phone: 517/629-0338
Email:

Ronney Mourad, professor of religious studies and department chair at Albion CollegeRonney Mourad
Professor
Religious Studies

Office: 211 Vulgamore
Phone: 517/629-0354
Email:

Clayton Parr, assistant professor of music, Albion CollegeClayton ParrAssociate Professor
Music

Office: T-1, Goodrich Chapel
Phone: 517-629-0251
Email:

Gregg Strand - Director of Corporate and Foundation RelationsGregg Strand
Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations
Institutional Advancement

Office: 3rd Floor Ferguson
Phone: 517/629-0510
Email:

John Woell, associate provost and professor of philosophy, Albion CollegeJohn Woell
Associate Provost

Phone: 517/629-0776
Email:

Albion College Student Farm

The mission of the Albion College Student Farm Association is to cultivate a student-organized, all-natural, sustainable, and aesthetically pleasing produce garden for the benefit of students and faculty from all academic disciplines and community members of all ages.

Using a combination of fields, a hoop house, and Three Sisters plots, the student farm grows a variety of peppers, tomatoes, green beens, onions, squash, corn, beets, and herbs at its location in the Whitehouse Nature Center

The goals of the student farm include:

  • Promote gardening as an uplifting, healthful, environmentally-friendly activity
  • Experiment with organic gardening practices such as composting and planting heirloom seeds
  • Raise awareness about the role of a local diet in reducing carbon footprint by offering our produce to Dining Services, student apartments, and annexes
  • Help ensure equal access to nutritious food in the Albion community by donating produce to local charities
  • Encourage Albion residents, especially youth, to learn about and appreciate organic gardening, become more connected with their local food system, and grow a deeper sense of community.

A group of five students started the farm during Albion’s Year of Sustainability in 2010.

Student Workers

The farm is a three way collaboration among Albion College's Center for Sustainability and the Environment, the Whitehouse Nature Center, and an independent student organization.

The work in the student farm is all volunteer during the school year. In the summer, the Center for Sustainability employs two interns to work half time at the farm, with the Nature Center employing them the other half of their time. 

Gardens and Hoop House

The The 1,440-square-foot growhouse is a "greenhouse on wheels." The hoop house was made possible by a generous gift from the Baird family in honor of Jessica Baird’s, ’11, graduation. Jessie was one of the founding members of the student organization. The Student Senate has also supported the student organization generously over the years.

In the hoop house, student farmers grow tomatoes and a variety of peppers. Outside the hoop house, students manage Three Sisters plots (corn, beans, and squash), as well as:

  • Winter squash
  • Watermelons
  • Various herbs, including basil, parsley, oregano, mints
  • Onions 
  • Summer squash
  • Green beans

How To Help

You can get involved with Albion's student farm by volunteering with the Student Farm Association, or apply to work at the student farm during the summer. Contact CSE Director Tim Lincoln for details. 

The student farm needs help with:

  • Weeding
  • Composting
  • Planting and cultivating crops

 

Chemistry Majors - Class of 2015

What we are doing now

Paige Ankney 
Anna CieslakWilliam and Mary, Accounting Masters
Spencer Gibbs KibbeGap year working as a CNA in an emergency room
Chaney HathawayEmployment in Accounting
Austin LelleBrewery apprentice
Arianna Leonardi 
Joshua PenderUniversity of Texas at Austin for a PhD in chemistry
Alexander PoolGap year working as a CAN the medical school
Michelle Samson 
Stephanie SandersCornell U to pursue a PhD in physical materials chemistry
Michael TolkaczUniversity of Toledo Medical School
Nicholas WebsterBaylor College of Medicine
Allie Washabaugh2 years of research at U of Michigan in the surgery dept.
Evan YoungU of California, Davis, PhD in chemistry

Samantha Stanek, '13

Samantha StanekCurrent LocationUniversity of Michigan-Flint Physical Therapy School in Flint, MI

Current Occupation: 3rd year PT student

In a nutshell, what do you do? 

I am in my final year of physical therapy school. I am currently finishing up my didactic course work, and I start three 10-week clinical rotations in the fall. During these clinical rotations, I will gain experience in orthopedics, pediatrics, and inpatient rehabilitation.

How did Albion's Healthcare Institute help you get there?

Albion's Healthcare Institute helped open my eyes to other healthcare professions that I hadn’t had much exposure to prior to college. The institute provided me with the resources to help get me into physical therapy school, and assisted me with observation sites to obtain the required volunteer hours to apply to PT school. I was also provided with resources to assist in studying for the GRE.

What's your best Albion College memory? 

I have too many great memories at Albion. My best memories include spending time with my friends on the weekends, going to La Casa, and dancing with the Albion College Dance Team during half time of the basketball games.

What's the benefit of having a healthcare institute like Albion's?

The benefit of being a part a healthcare institute like Albion’s is the guidance that you receive along the way. My intended major and ideas for career choices changed many times at the beginning of my Albion education. I was able to talk about it with someone who could provide me with more information on each career and help find the best fit for me. The institute provides an individualized plan for each member to help them best succeed in whatever they may want to pursue.

Brandon Lebioda, '18, Talks Clinical Job Shadowing

Brandon Lebioda, '18Major: Biology

Hometown: Romeo, Michigan

What was your summer experience like?

My summer experience consisted of a total of 40 hours shadowing in clinical settings. It started with Dr. Michael Williams, who is a family doctor for Prism Medical Group. He was my contact that helped me set up with other doctors in the Macomb area. I ended up shadowing seven different doctors from all ranges of practice. I had the pleasure of observing many different types of physician work, which ranges from watching multiple surgeries in Troy Beaumont's operating rooms to being with doctors in family practices. Every physician or surgeon that I shadowed had something else to bring to the table, and every new place I went felt like a new adventure in the world of healthcare.

What do you love about being in Albion's Healthcare Institute?

I love Albion's Healthcare Institute because of their effort. Dr. Barbara Keyes was the person who set me up with Dr. Williams, and I believe that without her none of my experience could have been possible. The Healthcare Institute goes to great lengths to prepare students for the next step toward their career goals, whether that is some sort of specialty school, or jobs within healthcare. This institute provides hands-on help to educate and help students toward their goals.

How do you think your experience will help you in your career goals?

I believe this summer experience helped me gain crucial knowledge of different healthcare careers while also giving me a sense of direction when it comes to choosing the career that suites my interests the best. Watching these different physicians, and learning about their backgrounds, allowed me to see how many different paths there are to become a kind and caring physician, who works hard to improve the lives of their patients.

What do you love about Albion College?

I love Albion College because of it's family atmosphere. The College as a whole, not only the Institute of Healthcare, does a great job of preparing students for their next step. The smaller numbers allow coaches, professors, advisors, and other faculty members to create relationships with students that other universities cannot compete with.

Elliot Brinker, '18

Elliot Brinker

Major: Spanish and French

Hometown: Livonia, Michigan

What makes you want to be a teacher or educator?

I wanted to be a teacher only after I realized what I wanted to do and who I wanted to be as a person. In high school, I found that I have an interest in languages and cultures, and a passion for understanding more of the world. Ever since I was young I’ve had a love for helping others. Despite the technology and advances that have been made in our time I feel that too many people grow up only understanding the bubble that they live in. It is my desire to help open people’s eyes, and allow them to connect with more of humanity that drives me towards education.

What do you love about being in Albion's Shurmur Center?

The two things that I love most about the Shurmur Center are the support that it provides and shared passion of the entire center and education department. You are supported on every level and through every step of the process towards becoming an educator. The staff and faculty foster close connections with the students and professionals in field and in the classroom. It is always easy to tell that the driving force behind these connections is the passion of those involved in the Center.

This passion extends beyond the Albion College students that they teach and is rooted in a concern for the students that will be taught by the graduates of the Shurmur Center. While every Shurmur Center student is supported and encouraged, we are taught to reflect on our own interests and goals to assure that we are the most effective in our future jobs as educators.

How do you think this experience will help you in your career goals?

The Shurmur Center and the education department really prepare you to excel as an educator in the future. The program includes large amounts of field experience, starting with the very first course, which really prepare you to be in the classroom. For many people, it helps them decide what kind of field they want to go into. This reflects the Center’s desire to help the students of future graduates before anything else. On a more personal basis, the program very closely reflects my own personal career goals, not only in becoming a teacher, but by helping me become the kind of teacher I want to be. Albion’s teacher education program focuses on a holistic teaching approach that I feel will best assist my future students in their own goals and educations.

What do you love about Albion College?

So much of what I learn and what I do at Albion reflects my life and my future life.  Almost all of my experiences at Albion College have not only educated me as a student, but also as a person. At Albion, I don’t feel any disconnect between my school experiences and the world around me. It is not that every fact I learn is specifically relevant to my own life, but every professor, student, or person I meet here helps me understand how everything is a lesson and how those lessons can help me shape my future.

Class of 2015

Athletic Training

Zach Brigham Graduate assistant at Eastern Carolina University
Bethany Brooks Enrolled in post graduate classes

Exercise Science

Cody Crawford
Dylan Danowski
Chelsea Denton
Robert Green
Krystin Haapala
Adam Hahn
Drew Kapture
Kelsey Sandahl
Paige Trudeau

Joel Klain

Joel KlainTechnical Director

Office: 516 Herrick
Phone: 517/629-0639
E-mail:

Joel is a graduate of Central Michigan University and The Apprentice Program at the Purple Rose Theatre Company, where he later served as Assistant Technical Director.

Along with technical direction, Joel is an experienced Lighting Designer, Sound Designer, Scenic Designer, Master Electrician, carpenter, and metal smith.

Other production credits include: The Tipping Point Theatre Company, The Performance Network Theatre Company, and Central Michigan University.

Joel is honored to bring his talents to the Department of Theatre at Albion College and would like to thank his friends, parents, and his wife, Amy, for their unending support.

Graduation Audit Forms 2017-2018

All documents below are in PDF format. 

 

 

Document for levels of review

What Qualifies for Exempt (C-1) Review?

Available to Faculty and Community Members Only

To qualify for Exempt Review, the research must meet all of the following criteria:

  • Must not involve pregnant women, prisoners or mentally impaired persons;
  • Must not include survey research with minors unless involving standard educational activities (e.g., educational tests) within the particular education system;
  • Must not include observation of a minor’s public behavior unless there is no researcher interaction;
  • Research must not involve video or audio recording of subjects; and
  • Must be in one or more of the following categories:

Categories for Exempt Review

  1. Research will be conducted in established or commonly accepted educational settings, involving normal educational practices, such as (a) research on regular and special education instructional strategies, or (b) research on the effectiveness or the comparison among instructional techniques, curricula, or classroom management methods.
  2. Research will involve the use of educational tests (cognitive, diagnostic, aptitude, achievement), survey procedures, interview procedures or observation of public behavior, unless the subjects can be identified directly or through identifiers linked to the subjects and disclosure of responses could reasonably place the subjects at risk or criminal or civil liability or be damaging to the subjects’ financial standing, employability or reputation.
  3. Research will involve the use of educational tests (cognitive, diagnostic, aptitude, achievement), survey procedures, interview procedures, or observation of public behavior that is not exempt under item (2) above, if (a) the subjects are elected or appointed public officials or candidates for public office; or (b) Federal statute(s) require(s) that the confidentiality or other personally identifiable information will be maintained throughout the research and thereafter.
  4. Research will involve the collection or study of existing data, documents, records, if these sources are publicly available or if the information is recorded by the investigator in such a manner that subjects cannot be identified directly or through identifiers linked to the subjects.
  5. Research and demonstration projects which are conducted by or subject to the approval of federal agency sponsoring the research, and which are designed to study, evaluate or otherwise examine (a) public benefit or service programs, (b) procedures for obtaining benefits or services under those programs, (c) possible changes in or alternatives to those programs or procedures, or (d) possible changes in methods or levels of payment for benefits or services under those programs.
  6. Taste and food quality evaluation and consumer acceptance studies, if (a) wholesome foods without additives are consumed, or if (b) a food is consumed that contains a food ingredient at or below the level and for a use found to be safe, by the Food and Drug Administration or approved by the Environmental Protection Agency or the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

What Qualifies for Expedited (C-2) Review?

To qualify for Expedited Review, the research must meet all of the following criteria:

  • Be of minimal risk to the subjects;
  • Must not involve pregnant women, prisoners or mentally impaired persons;
  • Involve only procedures listed in one or more of the following categories:

Categories for Expedited Review

  1. Research involving materials (data, documents, records) that have been collected or will be collected solely for non-research purposes (such as medical treatment or diagnosis).
  2. Collection of data from voice, video, digital, or image recordings made for research purposes.
  3. Research on individual or group characteristics or behavior (including, but not limited to, research on perception, cognition, motivation, identity, language communication, cultural beliefs or practices, social behavior), or research employing survey, interview, oral history, focus group, program evaluation, human factors evaluation, or quality assurance methodologies.

What Types of Research Require Full (C-3) IRB Review?

Research that requires full committee review may include one or more of the following:

  • Prisoners
  • Pregnant Women
  • Fetuses
  • Mentally Disabled Persons
  • Poses greater than minimal risks to subjects (unless qualifying for Exempt review)
  • Vulnerable Populations (see definitions, below)

This list is not exhaustive. The final decision as to whether an application is reviewed by the Board at a convened meeting is that of the IRB Chair and/or Board.

Vulnerable Populations:

Individuals whose willingness to volunteer in a study or clinical trial may be unduly influenced by the expectation, whether justified or not, of benefits associated with participation, or of a retaliatory response from senior members of a hierarchy in case of refusal to participate. Examples are members of a group with a hierarchical structure, such as medical, pharmacy, dental, and nursing students, subordinate hospital and laboratory personnel, employees of the pharmaceutical industry, members of the armed forces (i.e., ROTC or Corps of Cadets), and persons kept in prison or detention. Other vulnerable subjects include patients with incurable diseases, persons in nursing homes, unemployed or impoverished persons, patients in emergency situations, ethnic minority groups, homeless persons, nomads, refugees, minors, and those incapable of giving consent.

Audit Forms

Please use these forms when doing your academic planning.  If you have any questions contact the Gerstacker Institute staff or the Registrar's office.

pdfB&O Major Audit Form

pdfB&O Minor Audit Form

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Institute core requirements are found in the Departments and Courses section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Foreign Languages, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, Honors

Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

Departmental Majors

Anthropology and Sociology
Art
Art History
Athletic Training
Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
French
Geological Sciences

German
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Spanish
Theatre


Interdepartmental Majors

Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics

 

Interdisciplinary Majors

American Studies
Ethnic Studies
International Studies

Public Policy
Women's and Gender Studies

Individually Designed Majors

Units for Major: 8-10

Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

Anthropology and Sociology
Anthropology, Sociology
Anthropology/Sociology
Art
Art, Art History
Asian Studies
Biology
Cell and Molecular Biology
Environmental Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics and Management
Economics, Management
English
English, Journalism
Foreign Language
French, German,
Spanish
Gender Studies
Geological Sciences
Geology, Environmental
Geology, Geographic
Information Systems,
Paleontology

History
Mathematics
Mathematics,
Applied Mathematics,
Statistics,
Computer Science
Philosophy
Philosophy, History of
Philosophy, Philosophy
of Mind, Value Theory
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Theatre
Dance
Women's Studies

Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations and Institutes are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Mass Communication
Neuroscience
Professional Management
Public Policy and Service

Institutes

Brown Honors Institute
Institute for the Study of the Environment
Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service
Gerstacker Institute for Professional Management
Liberal Arts Institute for Premedical and Health Care Studies
Shurmur Education Institute

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music (including up to four 1/4-unit music ensembles), Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

  • Accounting
  • Anthropology
  • Anthropology and Sociology
  • Art (Studio Art)
  • Art History
  • Athletic Training
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Earth Science
  • Economics and Management
  • English
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Exercise Science
  • Finance
  • French
  • Geological Sciences
  • German
  • History
  • Individually Designed Major
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics/Economics
  • Mathematics/Physics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Policy
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Sustainability Studies
  • Theatre
  • Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

  • Anthropology
    • Anthropology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Art
    • Art, Art History
  • Biology
    • Cell and Molecular Biology
    • Environmental Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Economics and Management
    • Accounting—Corporate Track,
    • Economics, Finance, Management
  • Education
    • Educational Studies
  • English
  • Foreign Language
    • French, German,
    • Spanish
  • Gender Studies
  • Geological Sciences
    • Geology, Environmental
    • Geology, Geographic
    • Information Systems,
    • Paleontology
  • History
  • Mathematics
    • Mathematics,
    • Applied Mathematics,
    • Statistics,
    • Computer Science
  • Philosophy
    • Philosophy, History of
    • Philosophy, Philosophy
    • of Mind, Value Theory
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
    • Sociology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Theatre
  • Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Departments and Courses section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, Honors

Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

Departmental Majors

Anthropology and Sociology
Art
Art History
Athletic Training
Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
Exercise Science
French

Geological Sciences
German
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Spanish
Theatre


Interdepartmental Majors

Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics

 

Interdisciplinary Majors

Ethnic Studies
International Studies

Public Policy
Women's and Gender Studies

Individually Designed Majors

Units for Major: 8-10

Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

Anthropology and Sociology
  Anthropology, Sociology
  Anthropology/Sociology
Art
  Art, Art History
Biology
  Cell and Molecular Biology
  Environmental Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics and Management
  Economics, Management
English
Foreign Language
  French, German,
  Spanish
Gender Studies

Geological Sciences
  Geology, Environmental
  Geology, Geographic
  Information Systems,
  Paleontology
History
Mathematics
  Mathematics,
  Applied Mathematics,
  Statistics,
  Computer Science
Philosophy
  Philosophy, History of
  Philosophy, Philosophy
  of Mind, Value Theory
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Theatre
Women's Studies

Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Professional Management
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Premedical Professions and Health Sciences
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Departments and Courses section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, Honors

Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

Departmental Majors

Anthropology
Art
Art History
Athletic Training
Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
Exercise Science
French
Geological Sciences

German
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre


Interdepartmental Majors

Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics

 

Interdisciplinary Majors

Ethnic Studies
International Studies

Public Policy
Women's and Gender Studies

Individually Designed Majors

Units for Major: 8-10

Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

Anthropology
  Anthropology,
  Anthropology/Sociology
Art
  Art, Art History
Biology
  Cell and Molecular Biology
  Environmental Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics and Management
  Economics, Management
English
Foreign Language
  French, German,
  Spanish
Gender Studies
Geological Sciences
  Geology, Environmental
  Geology, Geographic
  Information Systems,
  Paleontology

History
Mathematics
  Mathematics,
  Applied Mathematics,
  Statistics,
  Computer Science
Philosophy
  Philosophy, History of
  Philosophy, Philosophy
  of Mind, Value Theory
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
  Sociology,
  Anthropology/Sociology
Theatre
Women's Studies

Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Professional Management
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Premedical Professions and Health Sciences
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

Anthropology
Anthropology and Sociology
Art (Studio Art)
Art History
Athletic Training
Biochemistry
Biology
Business and Organizations
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ethnic Studies
Exercise Science
French
Geological Sciences

German
History
Individually Designed Major
International Studies
Mathematics
Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Public Policy
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Sustainability Studies
Theatre
Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

Anthropology
  Anthropology,
  Anthropology/Sociology
Art
  Art, Art History
Biology
  Cell and Molecular Biology
  Environmental Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics and Management
  Economics, Management
English
Foreign Language
  French, German,
  Spanish
Gender Studies
Geological Sciences
  Geology, Environmental
  Geology, Geographic
  Information Systems,
  Paleontology

History
Mathematics
  Mathematics,
  Applied Mathematics,
  Statistics,
  Computer Science
Philosophy
  Philosophy, History of
  Philosophy, Philosophy
  of Mind, Value Theory
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
  Sociology,
  Anthropology/Sociology
Theatre
Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music (including up to four 1/4-unit music ensembles), Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

  • Accounting
  • Anthropology
  • Anthropology and Sociology
  • Art (Studio Art)
  • Art History
  • Athletic Training
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Earth Science
  • Economics and Management
  • English
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Exercise Science
  • Finance
  • French
  • Geological Sciences
  • German
  • History
  • Individually Designed Major
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics/Economics
  • Mathematics/Physics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Policy
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Sustainability Studies
  • Theatre
  • Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

  • Anthropology
    • Anthropology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Art
    • Art, Art History
  • Biology
    • Cell and Molecular Biology
    • Environmental Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Economics and Management
    • Economics, Management
  • Education
    • Educational Studies
  • English
  • Foreign Language
    • French, German,
    • Spanish
  • Gender Studies
  • Geological Sciences
    • Geology, Environmental
    • Geology, Geographic
    • Information Systems,
    • Paleontology
  • History
  • Mathematics
    • Mathematics,
    • Applied Mathematics,
    • Statistics,
    • Computer Science
  • Philosophy
    • Philosophy, History of
    • Philosophy, Philosophy
    • of Mind, Value Theory
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
    • Sociology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Theatre
  • Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music (including up to four 1/4-unit music ensembles), Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

  • Accounting
  • Anthropology
  • Anthropology and Sociology
  • Art (Studio Art)
  • Art History
  • Athletic Training
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Earth Science
  • Economics and Management
  • English
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Exercise Science
  • Finance
  • French
  • Geological Sciences
  • German
  • History
  • Individually Designed Major
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics/Economics
  • Mathematics/Physics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Policy
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Sustainability Studies
  • Theatre
  • Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

  • Anthropology
    • Anthropology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Art
    • Art, Art History
  • Biology
    • Cell and Molecular Biology
    • Environmental Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Economics and Management
    • Accounting—Corporate Track,
    • Economics, Finance, Management
  • Education
    • Educational Studies
  • English
  • Foreign Language
    • French, German,
    • Spanish
  • Gender Studies
  • Geological Sciences
    • Geology, Environmental
    • Geology, Geographic
    • Information Systems,
    • Paleontology
  • History
  • Mathematics
    • Mathematics,
    • Applied Mathematics,
    • Statistics,
    • Computer Science
  • Philosophy
    • Philosophy, History of
    • Philosophy, Philosophy
    • of Mind, Value Theory
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
    • Sociology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Theatre
  • Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be required to withdraw from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing -- A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation -- A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation -- A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation -- Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. A student who fails to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation may be subject to required academic withdrawal.

Required Academic Withdrawal -- A student is subject to academic withdrawal if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic withdrawal if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds -- The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements -- A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence -- Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College -- Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission -- Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $50.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status) -- Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admissions Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be required to withdraw from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing -- A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation -- A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation -- A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation -- Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. A student who fails to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation may be subject to required academic withdrawal.

Required Academic Withdrawal -- A student is subject to academic withdrawal if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic withdrawal if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds -- The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements -- A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence -- Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College -- Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission -- Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status) -- Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing -- A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation -- A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation -- A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation -- Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension-- A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds -- The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements -- A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence -- Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College -- Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission -- Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status) -- Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Trustees

Effective for the 2009-10 board year.

Frederick M. Adams, chairman-Michigan, Northern Trust Bank, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2011 T).

Carolyn E. Aishton, vice president, corporate programs (retired), Avon Products, Inc., New York, New York (2010 T).

Robert A. Armitage, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Indiana (2012 T).

Daniel Boggan, Jr., chief operating officer (retired), National Collegiate Athletic Association, Oakland, California (2011 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney, Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., East Lansing, Michigan (2010 A).

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, Greenville United Methodist Church, Greenville, Michigan (2010 WM).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2011 A).

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Berkeley, California (2012 T).  *Chair of the Audit Committee.

Anne H. Hunter, president, Marketing Source USA, Inc., Edina, Minnesota (2012 A). *Chair for the Committee on Enrollment and Marketing.

David K. Johnson, physician, Lansing Institute of Urology, East Lansing, Michigan (2011 A).

Jonathan D. Keaton, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (ex-officio).

Carol A. Leisenring, co-director, Financial Institutions Center, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2012 T). *Chair of the Investment Committee.

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair for the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Robert D. Musser III, president, The Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2010 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman, Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., Washington, DC (2010 T). *Chair for the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Jeffrey C. Petherick, founder/partner, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2011 T).

Donna M. Randall, president, Albion College.

Charles G. Raphael, executive vice president, retail banking group (retired), Bank One Corp., Williamsburg, Virginia (2012 A).

William A. Ritter, senior minister (retired), Birmingham First United Methodist Church, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2010 D). *Chair for the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen N. Sanney, recent graduate (2010 R).

William Schuette, senior counsel, Warner, Norcross & Judd, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2010 T).

Joseph O. Serra, president, Serra Automotive, Grand Blanc, Michigan (2012 T).

Thomas C. Shearer, J.D., president, Thomas C. Shearer, P.C., Grand Rapids, Michigan (2012 WM).

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2012 T). *Chair of the Infrastructure Committee.

Richard M. Smith, chairman, Newsweek, New York, New York. (2011 T).

William K. Stoffer, chief executive officer, Albion Machine and Tool Company, Albion, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair for the Committee on Institutional Advancement.

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair of the Board.

Jennifer L. Toteff, recent graduate (2011 R)

John N. Vournakis, vice president for research and development, Marine Polymer Technologies, Charleston, South Carolina (2011 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T--elected by the Board of Trustees; A--elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D--elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM--elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R--recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, White Plains, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Tecumseh, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board,
Norwalk, Connecticut.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Iron Mountain,
Michigan.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, Michigan.

John S. Ludington, chairman emeritus, Dow Corning Corporation, Midland,
Michigan.

Paul W. McCracken, Edmund Ezra Day professor of business administration, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

John W. Porter, education consultant (retired), Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Lansing, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Trustees

Effective for the 2015-16 board year.

Kevin F. Asher, partner assurance services, Ernst and Young, LLP, San Jose, California (2016 T).

Joseph S. Calvaruso, executive director, Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2016 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney (retired), Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., Okemos, Michigan (2016 A). *Chair of the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, First United Methodist Church, Kalamazoo, Michigan (2016 WM).

Mauri A. Ditzler, president, Albion College, Albion, Michigan.

Mae Ola Dunklin, director (retired), Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development, Albion College, Albion, Michigan (2018 T).

Faith E. Fowler, executive director, Cass Community Social Services, Detroit, MI (2016 D).

Douglas R. Goering, professor of art, emeritus, Albion College, Flint, Michigan (2018 T).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2017 A).

Michael J. Harrington, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana (2018 T). *Chair of the Committee for Institutional Advancement.

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Suttons Bay, Michigan (2018 T). *Chair of the Audit and Compliance Committee.

Deborah L. Kiesey, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (2018).

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2017 T). *Chair of the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman (retired), Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., McLean, Virginia (2016 T). *Chair of the Committee for Enrollment and Marketing.

Jeffrey A. Ott, attorney, Warner Norcross & Judd, LLP, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2018 T).

Jeffrey C. Petherick, portfolio manager, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2017 T).

Lawrence B. Schook, vice president for research, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois (2018 T). *Chair of the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Johanna B. Schulte, ’15, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2018 R).

Samuel J. Shaheen, surgeon, Saginaw, Michigan (2017 T). *Chair of the Committee on Infrastructure.

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2018 T). *Chair of the Board.

Donald W. Strite, ’14, staff auditor, Ernst and Young, Detroit, Michigan (2016 R).

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2017 T).

Dennis W. Wahr, president and CEO, Holaira, Inc., Plymouth, Minnesota (2016 T).

Jeffrey D. Weedman, CEO/CBW, Cintrifuse (retired), Cincinnati, Ohio (2017 T).

James M. Wilson, professor and director, Gene Therapy Program, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2017 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T—elected by the Board of Trustees; A—elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D—elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM—elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R—recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, Palatine, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer (retired), Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, Armonk, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Petoskey, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board, Tucson, Arizona.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Florence, Wisconsin.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Stowe, Vermont.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Byron Center, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Trustees

Effective for the 2009-10 board year.

Frederick M. Adams, chairman-Michigan, Northern Trust Bank, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2011 T).

Carolyn E. Aishton, vice president, corporate programs (retired), Avon Products, Inc., New York, New York (2010 T).

Robert A. Armitage, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Indiana (2012 T).

Daniel Boggan, Jr., chief operating officer (retired), National Collegiate Athletic Association, Oakland, California (2011 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney, Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., East Lansing, Michigan (2010 A).

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, Greenville United Methodist Church, Greenville, Michigan (2010 WM).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2011 A).

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Berkeley, California (2012 T).  *Chair of the Audit Committee.

Anne H. Hunter, president, Marketing Source USA, Inc., Edina, Minnesota (2012 A). *Chair for the Committee on Enrollment and Marketing.

David K. Johnson, physician, Lansing Institute of Urology, East Lansing, Michigan (2011 A).

Jonathan D. Keaton, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (ex-officio).

Carol A. Leisenring, co-director, Financial Institutions Center, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2012 T). *Chair of the Investment Committee.

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair for the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Robert D. Musser III, president, The Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2010 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman, Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., Washington, DC (2010 T). *Chair for the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Jeffrey C. Petherick, founder/partner, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2011 T).

Donna M. Randall, president, Albion College.

Charles G. Raphael, executive vice president, retail banking group (retired), Bank One Corp., Williamsburg, Virginia (2012 A).

William A. Ritter, senior minister (retired), Birmingham First United Methodist Church, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2010 D). *Chair for the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen N. Sanney, recent graduate (2010 R).

William Schuette, senior counsel, Warner, Norcross & Judd, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2010 T).

Joseph O. Serra, president, Serra Automotive, Grand Blanc, Michigan (2012 T).

Thomas C. Shearer, J.D., president, Thomas C. Shearer, P.C., Grand Rapids, Michigan (2012 WM).

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2012 T). *Chair of the Infrastructure Committee.

Richard M. Smith, chairman, Newsweek, New York, New York. (2011 T).

William K. Stoffer, chief executive officer, Albion Machine and Tool Company, Albion, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair for the Committee on Institutional Advancement.

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair of the Board.

Jennifer L. Toteff, recent graduate (2011 R)

John N. Vournakis, vice president for research and development, Marine Polymer Technologies, Charleston, South Carolina (2011 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T--elected by the Board of Trustees; A--elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D--elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM--elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R--recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, White Plains, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Tecumseh, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board,
Norwalk, Connecticut.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Iron Mountain,
Michigan.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, Michigan.

John S. Ludington, chairman emeritus, Dow Corning Corporation, Midland,
Michigan.

Paul W. McCracken, Edmund Ezra Day professor of business administration, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

John W. Porter, education consultant (retired), Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Lansing, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Trustees

Effective for the 2011-12 board year.

Ryan E. Arey, graduate student, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2013 R).

Robert A. Armitage, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Indiana (2012 T). *Chair of the Committee on Infrastructure.

Joseph S. Calvaruso, executive director, Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2012 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney, Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., East Lansing, Michigan (2013 A).

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, Greenville United Methodist Church, Greenville, Michigan (2013 WM).

George S. Chavel, president and CEO, Sodexo, Gaithersburg, Maryland (2012 T).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2014 A).

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Berkeley, California (2012 T).  *Chair of the Audit and Compliance Committee.

Anne H. Hunter, president, Marketing Source USA, Inc., Edina, Minnesota (2012 A). *Chair of the Committee on Enrollment and Marketing.

David K. Johnson, physician, Lansing Institute of Urology, East Lansing, Michigan (2014 A).

Jonathan D. Keaton, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (ex-officio).

Carol A. Leisenring, co-director, Financial Institutions Center, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2012 T). *Chair of the Investment Committee.

Ann M. Lewicki, radiologist and associate professor of radiology, Washington, D.C. (2012 T).

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2014 T). *Chair of the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Robert D. Musser III, president, The Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2013 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman, Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., Washington, D.C. (2013 T). *Chair of the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Jeffrey C. Petherick, founder/partner, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2014 T).

Donna M. Randall, president, Albion College.

Charles G. Raphael, executive vice president, retail banking group (retired), Bank One Corp., Williamsburg, Virginia (2012 A).

William A. Ritter, senior minister (retired), Birmingham First United Methodist Church, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2013 D). *Chair of the Committee on Trusteeship.

Michael J. Rock, graduate student, Wayne State University School of Law, Detroit, Michigan (2011-12 R)

William Schuette, attorney general, State of Michigan, Lansing, Michigan (2013 T).

Joseph O. Serra, president, Serra Automotive, Grand Blanc, Michigan (2012 T).

Samuel J. Shaheen, surgeon, Saginaw, Michigan (2014 T).

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2012 T). *Chair of the Committee on Institutional Advancement.

William K. Stoffer, chief executive officer, Albion Machine and Tool Company, Albion, Michigan (2014 T).

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2014 T). *Chair of the Board.

Jeffrey D. Weedman, vice president for global business development, Proctor and Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio (2014 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T--elected by the Board of Trustees; A--elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D--elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM--elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R--recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, White Plains, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Tecumseh, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board,
Norwalk, Connecticut.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Iron Mountain,
Michigan.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, Michigan.

Paul W. McCracken, Edmund Ezra Day Professor of Business Administration, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

John W. Porter, education consultant (retired), Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Lansing, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Trustees

Effective for the 2012-13 board year.

Ryan E. Arey, Albion, Michigan (2013 R).

Joseph S. Calvaruso, executive director, Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2015 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney (retired), Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., Okemos, Michigan (2013 A).

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, Greenville United Methodist Church, Greenville, Michigan (2013 WM).

George S. Chavel, president and CEO, Sodexo, Gaithersburg, Maryland (2015 T).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2014 A).

Michael J. Harrington, vice president and deputy general counsel, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana (2015 T).

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Berkeley, California (2015 T).  *Chair of the Audit and Compliance Committee.

Casey C. Hoffman, Menominee, Michigan (2014 R).

Anne H. Hunter, president, HunterSage Marketing, Edina, Minnesota (2015 A). *Chair of the Committee on Enrollment and Marketing.

David K. Johnson, physician, Lansing Institute of Urology, East Lansing, Michigan (2014 A).

Jonathan D. Keaton, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (ex-officio).

Carol A. Leisenring, co-director (retired), Financial Institutions Center, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Radnor, Pennsylvania (2015 T). *Chair of the Investment Committee.

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2014 T). *Chair of the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Robert D. Musser III, president, The Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2013 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman (retired), Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., McLean, Virginia (2013 T). *Chair of the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Jeffrey A. Ott, attorney, Warner Norcross & Judd, LLP, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2015 T)

Jeffrey C. Petherick, portfolio manager, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2014 T).

Donna M. Randall, president, Albion College.

Charles G. Raphael, executive vice president, retail banking group (retired), Bank One Corp., Williamsburg, Virginia (2015 A).

William A. Ritter, senior minister (retired), Birmingham First United Methodist Church, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2013 D). *Chair of the Committee on Trusteeship.

William Schuette, attorney general, State of Michigan, Lansing, Michigan (2013 T).

Samuel J. Shaheen, surgeon, Saginaw, Michigan (2014 T).

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2015 T). *Chair of the Committee on Institutional Advancement.

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2014 T). *Chair of the Board.

Jeffrey D. Weedman, vice president for global business development, Proctor and Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio (2014 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T—elected by the Board of Trustees; A—elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D—elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM—elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R—recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, Palatine, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer (retired), Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, Armonk, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Petoskey, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board, Tucson, Arizona.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Florence, Wisconsin.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Stowe, Vermont.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Byron Center, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Trustees

Effective for the 2013-14 board year.

Kevin F. Asher, partner assurance services, Ernst and Young, LLP, San Jose, California (2016 T).

Joseph S. Calvaruso, executive director, Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2015 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney (retired), Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., Okemos, Michigan (2016 A). *Chair of the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, Greenville United Methodist Church, Greenville, Michigan (2016 WM).

George S. Chavel, president and CEO, Sodexo, Gaithersburg, Maryland (2015 T).

Faith E. Fowler, executive director, Cass Community Social Services, Detroit, MI (2016 D).

Michael L. Frandsen, interim president, Albion College, Albion, Michigan.

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2014 A).

Michael J. Harrington, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana (2015 T). *Chair of the Committee for Institutional Advancement.

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Berkeley, California (2015 T). *Chair of the Audit and Compliance Committee.

Casey C. Hoffman, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (2014 R).

David K. Johnson, physician, Lansing Institute of Urology, East Lansing, Michigan (2014 A).

Deborah L. Kiesey, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (2015).

Carol A. Leisenring, co-director (retired), Financial Institutions Center, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Radnor, Pennsylvania (2015 T). *Chair of the Investment Committee.

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2014 T). *Chair of the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Robert D. Musser III, president, The Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2016 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman (retired), Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., McLean, Virginia (2016 T). *Chair of the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Jeffrey A. Ott, attorney, Warner Norcross & Judd, LLP, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2015 T)

Jeffrey C. Petherick, portfolio manager, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2014 T).

Lawrence B. Schook, vice president for research, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois (2015 T).

William Schuette, attorney general, State of Michigan, Lansing, Michigan (2016 T).

Samuel J. Shaheen, surgeon, Saginaw, Michigan (2014 T). *Chair of the Committee on Infrastructure.

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2015 T). *Chair of the Board.

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2014 T).

Dennis W. Wahr, president and CEO, Holaira, Inc., Plymouth, Minnesota (2016 T).

Jeffrey D. Weedman, CEO/CBW, Cintrifuse, Cincinnati, Ohio (2014 T).

Hollis M. Williams, '13, teacher, Chesterton High School, Sylvania, OH (2015 R).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T—elected by the Board of Trustees; A—elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D—elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM—elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R—recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, Palatine, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer (retired), Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, Armonk, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Petoskey, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board, Tucson, Arizona.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Florence, Wisconsin.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Stowe, Vermont.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Byron Center, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Trustees

Effective for the 2014-15 board year.

Kevin F. Asher, partner assurance services, Ernst and Young, LLP, San Jose, California (2016 T).

Joseph S. Calvaruso, executive director, Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2015 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney (retired), Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., Okemos, Michigan (2016 A). *Chair of the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, First United Methodist Church, Kalamazoo, Michigan (2016 WM).

George S. Chavel, president and CEO, Sodexo, Gaithersburg, Maryland (2015 T).

Mauri A. Ditzler, president, Albion College, Albion, Michigan.

Faith E. Fowler, executive director, Cass Community Social Services, Detroit, MI (2016 D).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2017 A).

Michael J. Harrington, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana (2015 T). *Chair of the Committee for Institutional Advancement.

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Suttons Bay, Michigan (2015 T). *Chair of the Audit and Compliance Committee.

Deborah L. Kiesey, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (2015).

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2017 T). *Chair of the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Robert D. Musser III, president, Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2016 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman (retired), Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., McLean, Virginia (2016 T). *Chair of the Committee for Enrollment and Marketing.

Jeffrey A. Ott, attorney, Warner Norcross & Judd, LLP, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2015 T)

Jeffrey C. Petherick, portfolio manager, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2014 T).

Lawrence B. Schook, vice president for research, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois (2015 T). *Chair of the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

William Schuette, attorney general, State of Michigan, Lansing, Michigan (2016 T).

Samuel J. Shaheen, surgeon, Saginaw, Michigan (2014 T). *Chair of the Committee on Infrastructure.

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2015 T). *Chair of the Board.

Donald W. Strite, ’14, staff auditor, Ernst and Young, Detroit, Michigan (2016 R)

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2017 T).

Dennis W. Wahr, president and CEO, Holaira, Inc., Plymouth, Minnesota (2016 T).

Jeffrey D. Weedman, CEO/CBW, Cintrifuse, Cincinnati, Ohio (2017 T).

Hollis M. Williams, '13, teacher, Chesterton High School, Valparaiso, Indiana (2015 R).

James M. Wilson, professor and director, Gene Therapy Program, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2017 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T—elected by the Board of Trustees; A—elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D—elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM—elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R—recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, Palatine, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer (retired), Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, Armonk, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Petoskey, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board, Tucson, Arizona.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Florence, Wisconsin.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Stowe, Vermont.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Byron Center, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Admission to Albion

Application for First-Year Admission

Admission to Albion College is selective and based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials, personal qualifications, and potential for success at the College. Albion admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, creed or national origin.

The Admission Committee reviews applications on an individual basis, paying particular attention to the unique qualities each candidate possesses. The committee considers the following factors in evaluating an applicant's credentials: rigor of curriculum pursued, grades, co-curricular involvement in high school, community and religious activities, letters of recommendation received, and results of the ACT or SAT college admission tests.

Candidates for admission are expected to graduate from an accredited high school or preparatory school and have at least 15 units of academic credit in the following subjects: English, mathematics, social science, science and foreign language. Albion College also welcomes students who have been home schooled or who have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). In both cases, students should contact the director of admission to develop a process to review non-traditional academic experiences and competencies.

Students may submit an application for admission at any time. Normally, however, students apply after September 1 of their senior year in high school. In order to receive equal consideration for admission and financial aid, students should apply and have all required credentials on file by March 1 of their senior year.

Each paper application form must be accompanied by a fee of $40. This is a processing fee which is non-refundable and is not credited on any subsequent payments to the College. Students who submit an online application on the College's Web site are not charged a fee. Albion also accepts the Common Application.

Applicants seeking fall admission must pay a $300 enrollment deposit to the College postmarked no later than May 1 to secure their place in the fall class.

Applicants seeking spring admission should submit their $300 deposit before January 10.

Early Action

Albion welcomes students to apply early to secure a place in the fall class, and to ensure full consideration for academic and special talent scholarships. Students who apply by December 1 will be notified of an admission decision by January 1. The early action process is non-binding. All students who apply after December 1 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be notified of an admission decision beginning February 1 until the class is filled.

Entrance Tests

Standardized entrance tests (ACT or SAT) are required. High school students should sit for the ACT or SAT exam no later than February of their senior year. Albion College's code number is 1007 for the SAT and 1956 for the ACT. Information about the SAT may be obtained from the College Board at www.collegeboard.org. Information about the ACT may be obtained at www.act.org.

Campus Visit

A visit to the campus and a personal interview are highly recommended. As a service to campus visitors, guided tours of the campus are provided. The admission staff will also arrange visits with faculty members or with specific academic departments.

The Admission Office is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It is also open most Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon except during the summer.

Specific information pertaining to the curriculum, the faculty or admission to Albion College may be obtained from:

Admission Office
Albion College
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, Michigan 49224
Telephone: 800/858-6770
E-mail:
World Wide Web: http://www.albion.edu

Advanced Placement and CLEP

Albion College is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Under this program, a high school student who earns a grade of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement Examination automatically receives college credit and may receive advanced placement in the area of his or her proficiency.

A student who receives a grade of 3 may be given advanced placement, and at the discretion of the department, the student may be given college credit as well.

Some College departments also participate in the College-Level Subject Examination Program (CLEP) of CEEB. Albion College permits students to obtain a maximum of eight units of credit toward the bachelor of arts, and to fulfill core and/or major requirements through CLEP. Students should contact the Registrar's Office for information on which departments accept CLEP credit.

Maximum Credit Available Through Examination -- No more than eight units of credit can be obtained through any combination of locally designed departmental examinations and the College-Level Examination Program. No more than 12 units of credit can be obtained through any combination of the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and the College-Level Examination Program.

Immediate Sophomore Standing -- An entering student who presents six or more units obtained through the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and/or the College-Level Examination Program will obtain immediate sophomore standing.

Special Admissions

Transfer Students

Each year Albion accepts students who have attended other colleges or universities. It is recommended that candidates possess at least a 2.5 grade point average for consideration. It is expected that the applicant will be in good academic and social standing at the college last attended and that the previous college record has been strong enough to compare favorably with students already in attendance at Albion. Students are responsible for submitting, with their application, official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, along with an academic and social status supplement completed by the appropriate official from each instution previously attended.

Students with an official transcript marked "MACRAO approved" for an associate of arts (A.A.) degree from a Michigan community or junior college are exempt from taking the First-Year Seminar and the Modes of Inquiry requirement, and they may be admitted at the junior level. However, the following graduation requirements must be met: the category requirements and the writing competence requirement. A maximum of 16 units (64 semester hours) may be transferred from accredited junior colleges.

Candidates who transfer from an accredited four-year college must complete no less than the last 12 units (48 semester hours) in residence at Albion. These students must also complete all degree requirements including the category requirements and the writing competence requirement.

For more specific details regarding Albion's unit system and required course grades, refer to the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

International Students

To be considered for admission to Albion, an international student must complete the admission procedures including the following:

  • The Albion College International Application for Admission or Common Application for International Students.
  • Statement of Financial Support for International Students with supporting documents, i.e., bank statements, income/salary statements of parents or sponsors from their employers, and a financial support letter.
  • Personal statement/essay (one page minimum).
  • Original or certified copies of all academic records, secondary school transcripts, and college/university transcripts, translated into English and listing individual courses including types, number, and grades received. A minimum of at least three years of records will be required for students applying from four-year secondary institutions and a minimum of two years for students applying from three-year secondary institutions. In most cases, transfer students from colleges/universities outside the United States seeking admission to Albion College will require an external evaluation by World Education Services (WES) and Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) for transfer of college credits. Collegiate credits can be transferred at any time after the semester ends but will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the Albion College registrar.
  • Official scores of TOEFL, IELTS, ACT, SAT or ELS course 112 completion sent directly to Albion College from educational testing services. Albion College will also allow certified copies stamped by a school counselor or administrator.
  • Two letters of reference from the guidance counselor or headmaster, English teacher (or teacher of choice for English-speaking nations) or a community member from a club or service organization with which the student is affiliated.
  • Application fee of USD 40 is required for all international student applications. Applications will not be processed until the fee has been received. Please use the online payment form to make payment. Applicants may also send a certified bank check, or postal money order, in U.S. dollars, payable to Albion College. Please designate the check as “International Student Admission Application Fee.” Mail the payment to: Office of Admission, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224, U.S.A.

To ensure enough time to obtain a student visa, we advise students to complete the application package and send it to Albion College by April 1 for fall admission, October 1 for spring admission, or December 1 for early action. Late applications will be reviewed if space allows. Once Albion College has received the application materials, an admission decision is made within four weeks.

Financial Aid—American students at Albion College pay anywhere from half of the cost of their education up to the full cost. International students should consider an Albion education an investment the student, family and sponsors are willing to make. Few colleges and universities in the United States provide financial support to international students. International students often receive scholarships to Albion College, although our policies limit the maximum award for international students to 50 percent of the total cost of attendance.

Students who demonstrate the highest academic potential and bring significant co-curricular interests to our campus will receive the greatest consideration for these awards. In awarding scholarships, Albion College also considers an applicant's financial need upon review of the application, as well as other requirements.

Notification of a scholarship is made at the time of admission, and will be noted in the acceptance letter.

For further information about international student admission requirements, please contact:

Office of Admission
Albion College
c/o International Student Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, MI 49224
U.S.A.

International Baccalaureate -- The College recognizes the strength and rigor of the International Baccalaureate Program. Students will receive one unit (four semester hours) of credit for higher level passes with a score of 5 or more. Scores of 4 will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Normally, no more than four units (16 hours) of credit from this program will be awarded to an individual. Students must petition a department or the faculty Petitions Committee for exceptions to these limits.

Other Candidates

Veterans -- Veterans returning from military service and other eligible military personnel are admitted to Albion College under the training provisions established by the Veterans Administration. The College may allow credit for military service activities which have educational content to students who present acceptable military records. Such credentials should be submitted as part of the admission materials. Details about veterans benefits under the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008 are available online.

ConApp -- Albion College is a participating college in the United States Army Concurrent Application Program (ConApp) and welcomes applications from prospective students who wish to continue their education after active duty military service. Interested students should contact the Albion College Admissions Office or their Army recruiter for information on the ConApp program and related veteran's benefits for higher education. Albion guarantees admission to qualified ConApp applicants after military service.

Auditors -- A non-degree student may enroll as an official auditor. This obligates a student to attend classes and complete course requirements (papers, laboratory assignments, tests, and a final examination). The course appears on the transcript and the grade is posted, but no degree credit is earned.

Guest Students -- Albion College accepts a number of guest students. All guest students must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Guest students assume responsibility for determining whether the course they take at Albion will apply to their program of study.

Admission to Albion

Application for First-Year Admission

Admission to Albion College is selective and based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials, personal qualifications, and potential for success at the College. Albion admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, creed or national origin.

The Admission Committee reviews applications on an individual basis, paying particular attention to the unique qualities each candidate possesses. The committee considers the following factors in evaluating an applicant's credentials: rigor of curriculum pursued, grades, co-curricular involvement in high school, community and religious activities, letters of recommendation received, and results of the ACT or SAT college admission tests.

Candidates for admission are expected to graduate from an accredited high school or preparatory school and have at least 15 units of academic credit in the following subjects: English, mathematics, social science, science and foreign language. Albion College also welcomes students who have been home schooled or who have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). In both cases, students should contact the director of admission to develop a process to review non-traditional academic experiences and competencies.

Students may submit an application for admission at any time after August 1. Normally, however, students apply after October of their senior year in high school. In order to receive equal consideration for admission and financial aid, students should apply and have all required credentials on file by February 15 of their senior year.

Students who submit an online application are not charged a fee. Albion has its own application and also accepts the Common Application.

Applicants seeking fall admission must pay a $350 enrollment deposit to the College postmarked no later than May 1 to secure their place in the fall class.

Applicants seeking spring admission should submit their $350 deposit before January 10.

Early Action

Albion welcomes students to apply early to secure a place in the fall class, and to ensure full consideration for academic and special talent scholarships. Students who apply by November 1 or December 1 will be notified of an admission decision by January 15. The early action process is non-binding. All students who apply after December 1 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be notified of an admission decision beginning February 1 until the class is filled.

Entrance Tests

Standardized entrance tests (ACT or SAT) are required. High school students should sit for the ACT or SAT exam no later than February of their senior year. Albion College's code number is 1007 for the SAT and 1956 for the ACT. Information about the SAT may be obtained from the College Board at www.collegeboard.org. Information about the ACT may be obtained at www.act.org.

Campus Visit

A visit to the campus and a personal interview are highly recommended. As a service to campus visitors, guided tours of the campus are provided. The admission staff will also arrange visits with faculty members or with specific academic departments.

The Admission Office is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It is also open on select Saturdays during the academic year.

Specific information pertaining to the curriculum, the faculty or admission to Albion College may be obtained from:

Albion College
Office of Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, Michigan 49224
Telephone: 800/858-6770
E-mail:
Web: http://www.albion.edu

Advanced Placement and CLEP

Albion College is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Under this program, a high school student who earns a grade of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement Examination automatically receives college credit and may receive advanced placement in the area of his or her proficiency.

Some College departments also participate in the College-Level Subject Examination Program (CLEP) of CEEB. Albion College permits students to obtain a maximum of eight units of credit toward the bachelor of arts, and to fulfill core and/or major requirements through CLEP. Students should contact the Registrar's Office for information on which departments accept CLEP credit.

Maximum Credit Available Through Examination—No more than eight units of credit can be obtained through any combination of locally designed departmental examinations and the College-Level Examination Program. No more than 12 units of credit can be obtained through any combination of the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and the College-Level Examination Program.

Immediate Sophomore Standing—An entering student who presents six or more units obtained through the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and/or the College-Level Examination Program will obtain immediate sophomore standing.

Special Admissions

Transfer Students

Each year Albion accepts students who have attended other colleges or universities. It is recommended that candidates possess at least a 3.0 grade point average for consideration. It is expected that the applicant will be in good academic and social standing at the college last attended and that the previous college record has been strong enough to compare favorably with students already in attendance at Albion. Students are responsible for submitting, with their application, official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, along with an academic and social status supplement completed by the appropriate official from each institution previously attended.

Students with an official transcript marked "MACRAO approved" for an associate of arts (A.A.) degree from a Michigan community or junior college are exempt from taking the First-Year Seminar and the Modes of Inquiry requirement, and they may be admitted at the junior level. However, the following graduation requirements must be met: the category requirements and the writing competence requirement. A maximum of 16 units (64 semester hours) may be transferred from accredited junior colleges.

Candidates who transfer from an accredited four-year college must complete no less than the last 12 units (48 semester hours) in residence at Albion. These students must also complete all degree requirements including the category requirements and the writing competence requirement.

For more specific details regarding Albion's unit system and required course grades, refer to the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

International Students

To be considered for admission to Albion, an international student must complete the admission procedures including the following:

  • Common Application for International Students.
  • Statement of Financial Support for International Students with supporting documents, i.e., bank statements, income/salary statements of parents or sponsors from their employers, and a financial support letter.
  • Personal statement/essay (one page minimum).
  • Original or certified copies of all academic records, secondary school transcripts, and college/university transcripts, translated into English and listing individual courses including types, number, and grades received. A minimum of at least three years of records will be required for students applying from four-year secondary institutions and a minimum of two years for students applying from three-year secondary institutions. In most cases, transfer students from colleges/universities outside the United States seeking admission to Albion College will require an external evaluation by World Education Services (WES) and Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) for transfer of college credits. Collegiate credits can be transferred at any time after the semester ends but will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the Albion College registrar.
  • Official scores of TOEFL, IELTS, ACT, SAT or ELS course 112 completion sent directly to Albion College from educational testing services. Albion College will also allow certified copies stamped by a school counselor or administrator.
  • Two letters of reference from the guidance counselor or headmaster, English teacher (or teacher of choice for English-speaking nations) or a community member from a club or service organization with which the student is affiliated.

To ensure enough time to obtain a student visa, we advise students to complete the application package and send it to Albion College by February 1 for fall admission, October 1 for spring admission, or December 1 for early action. Late applications will be reviewed if space allows. Once Albion College has received the application materials, an admission decision is made within four weeks.

Financial Aid—International students should consider an Albion education an investment the student, family and sponsors are willing to make. Few colleges and universities in the United States provide financial support to international students. International students often receive scholarships to Albion College, although our policies limit the maximum award for international students to 50 percent of the total cost of attendance.

Students who demonstrate the highest academic potential and bring significant co-curricular interests to our campus will receive the greatest consideration for these awards. In awarding scholarships, Albion College also considers an applicant's financial need upon review of the application, as well as other requirements.

Notification of a scholarship is made at the time of admission, and will be noted in the acceptance letter.

For further information about international student admission requirements, please contact:

Office of Admission
Albion College
c/o International Student Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, MI 49224
U.S.A.

International Baccalaureate—The College recognizes the strength and rigor of the International Baccalaureate Program. Students will receive one unit (four semester hours) of credit for IB courses/tests taken at the highest level with a score of 5 or more.

Other Candidates

Veterans—Veterans returning from military service and other eligible military personnel are admitted to Albion College under the training provisions established by the Veterans Administration. The College may allow credit for military service activities which have educational content to students who present acceptable military records. Such credentials should be submitted as part of the admission materials. Details about veteran's benefits under the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008 are available online.

ConApp—Albion College is a participating college in the United States Army Concurrent Application Program (ConApp) and welcomes applications from prospective students who wish to continue their education after active duty military service. Interested students should contact the Albion College Admissions Office or their Army recruiter for information on the ConApp program and related veteran's benefits for higher education. Albion guarantees admission to qualified ConApp applicants after military service.

Auditors—A non-degree student may enroll as an official auditor. This obligates a student to attend classes and complete course requirements (papers, laboratory assignments, tests, and a final examination). The course appears on the transcript and the grade is posted, but no degree credit is earned.

Guest Students—To be admitted as a guest student at Albion College students must complete the Michigan Undergraduate Guest Application. All guest students must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Guest students assume responsibility for determining whether the course they take at Albion will apply to their program of study.

Admission to Albion

Application for First-Year Admission

Admission to Albion College is selective and based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials, personal qualifications, and potential for success at the College. Albion admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, creed or national origin.

The Admission Committee reviews applications on an individual basis, paying particular attention to the unique qualities each candidate possesses. The committee considers the following factors in evaluating an applicant's credentials: rigor of curriculum pursued, grades, co-curricular involvement in high school, community and religious activities, letters of recommendation received, and results of the ACT or SAT college admission tests.

Candidates for admission are expected to graduate from an accredited high school or preparatory school and have at least 15 units of academic credit in the following subjects: English, mathematics, social science, science and foreign language. Albion College also welcomes students who have been home schooled or who have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). In both cases, students should contact the director of admission to develop a process to review non-traditional academic experiences and competencies.

Students may submit an application for admission at any time. Normally, however, students apply after September 1 of their senior year in high school. In order to receive equal consideration for admission and financial aid, students should apply and have all required credentials on file by March 1 of their senior year.

Each paper application form must be accompanied by a fee of $40. This is a processing fee which is non-refundable and is not credited on any subsequent payments to the College. Students who submit an online application on the College's Web site are not charged a fee. Albion also accepts the Common Application.

Applicants seeking fall admission must pay a $300 enrollment deposit to the College postmarked no later than May 1 to secure their place in the fall class.

Applicants seeking spring admission should submit their $300 deposit before January 10.

Early Action

Albion welcomes students to apply early to secure a place in the fall class, and to ensure full consideration for academic and special talent scholarships. Students who apply by December 1 will be notified of an admission decision by January 1. The early action process is non-binding. All students who apply after December 1 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be notified of an admission decision beginning February 1 until the class is filled.

Entrance Tests

Standardized entrance tests (ACT or SAT) are required. High school students should sit for the ACT or SAT exam no later than February of their senior year. Albion College's code number is 1007 for the SAT and 1956 for the ACT. Information about the SAT may be obtained from the College Board at www.collegeboard.org. Information about the ACT may be obtained at www.act.org.

Campus Visit

A visit to the campus and a personal interview are highly recommended. As a service to campus visitors, guided tours of the campus are provided. The admission staff will also arrange visits with faculty members or with specific academic departments.

The Admission Office is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It is also open on select Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon during the academic year.

Specific information pertaining to the curriculum, the faculty or admission to Albion College may be obtained from:

Admission Office
Albion College
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, Michigan 49224
Telephone: 800/858-6770
E-mail:
World Wide Web: http://www.albion.edu

Advanced Placement and CLEP

Albion College is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Under this program, a high school student who earns a grade of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement Examination automatically receives college credit and may receive advanced placement in the area of his or her proficiency.

A student who receives a grade of 3 may be given advanced placement, and at the discretion of the department, the student may be given college credit as well.

Some College departments also participate in the College-Level Subject Examination Program (CLEP) of CEEB. Albion College permits students to obtain a maximum of eight units of credit toward the bachelor of arts, and to fulfill core and/or major requirements through CLEP. Students should contact the Registrar's Office for information on which departments accept CLEP credit.

Maximum Credit Available Through Examination -- No more than eight units of credit can be obtained through any combination of locally designed departmental examinations and the College-Level Examination Program. No more than 12 units of credit can be obtained through any combination of the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and the College-Level Examination Program.

Immediate Sophomore Standing -- An entering student who presents six or more units obtained through the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and/or the College-Level Examination Program will obtain immediate sophomore standing.

Special Admissions

Transfer Students

Each year Albion accepts students who have attended other colleges or universities. It is recommended that candidates possess at least a 2.5 grade point average for consideration. It is expected that the applicant will be in good academic and social standing at the college last attended and that the previous college record has been strong enough to compare favorably with students already in attendance at Albion. Students are responsible for submitting, with their application, official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, along with an academic and social status supplement completed by the appropriate official from each instution previously attended.

Students with an official transcript marked "MACRAO approved" for an associate of arts (A.A.) degree from a Michigan community or junior college are exempt from taking the First-Year Seminar and the Modes of Inquiry requirement, and they may be admitted at the junior level. However, the following graduation requirements must be met: the category requirements and the writing competence requirement. A maximum of 16 units (64 semester hours) may be transferred from accredited junior colleges.

Candidates who transfer from an accredited four-year college must complete no less than the last 12 units (48 semester hours) in residence at Albion. These students must also complete all degree requirements including the category requirements and the writing competence requirement.

For more specific details regarding Albion's unit system and required course grades, refer to the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

International Students

To be considered for admission to Albion, an international student must complete the admission procedures including the following:

  • The Albion College International Application for Admission or Common Application for International Students.
  • Statement of Financial Support for International Students with supporting documents, i.e., bank statements, income/salary statements of parents or sponsors from their employers, and a financial support letter.
  • Personal statement/essay (one page minimum).
  • Original or certified copies of all academic records, secondary school transcripts, and college/university transcripts, translated into English and listing individual courses including types, number, and grades received. A minimum of at least three years of records will be required for students applying from four-year secondary institutions and a minimum of two years for students applying from three-year secondary institutions. In most cases, transfer students from colleges/universities outside the United States seeking admission to Albion College will require an external evaluation by World Education Services (WES) and Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) for transfer of college credits. Collegiate credits can be transferred at any time after the semester ends but will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the Albion College registrar.
  • Official scores of TOEFL, IELTS, ACT, SAT or ELS course 112 completion sent directly to Albion College from educational testing services. Albion College will also allow certified copies stamped by a school counselor or administrator.
  • Two letters of reference from the guidance counselor or headmaster, English teacher (or teacher of choice for English-speaking nations) or a community member from a club or service organization with which the student is affiliated.
  • Application fee of USD 40 is required for all international student applications. Applications will not be processed until the fee has been received. Please use the online payment form to make payment. Applicants may also send a certified bank check, or postal money order, in U.S. dollars, payable to Albion College. Please designate the check as “International Student Admission Application Fee.” Mail the payment to: Office of Admission, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224, U.S.A.

To ensure enough time to obtain a student visa, we advise students to complete the application package and send it to Albion College by April 1 for fall admission, October 1 for spring admission, or December 1 for early action. Late applications will be reviewed if space allows. Once Albion College has received the application materials, an admission decision is made within four weeks.

Financial Aid—American students at Albion College pay anywhere from half of the cost of their education up to the full cost. International students should consider an Albion education an investment the student, family and sponsors are willing to make. Few colleges and universities in the United States provide financial support to international students. International students often receive scholarships to Albion College, although our policies limit the maximum award for international students to 50 percent of the total cost of attendance.

Students who demonstrate the highest academic potential and bring significant co-curricular interests to our campus will receive the greatest consideration for these awards. In awarding scholarships, Albion College also considers an applicant's financial need upon review of the application, as well as other requirements.

Notification of a scholarship is made at the time of admission, and will be noted in the acceptance letter.

For further information about international student admission requirements, please contact:

Office of Admission
Albion College
c/o International Student Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, MI 49224
U.S.A.

International Baccalaureate -- The College recognizes the strength and rigor of the International Baccalaureate Program. Students will receive one unit (four semester hours) of credit for higher level passes with a score of 5 or more. Scores of 4 will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Normally, no more than four units (16 hours) of credit from this program will be awarded to an individual. Students must petition a department or the faculty Petitions Committee for exceptions to these limits.

Other Candidates

Veterans -- Veterans returning from military service and other eligible military personnel are admitted to Albion College under the training provisions established by the Veterans Administration. The College may allow credit for military service activities which have educational content to students who present acceptable military records. Such credentials should be submitted as part of the admission materials. Details about veterans benefits under the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008 are available online.

ConApp -- Albion College is a participating college in the United States Army Concurrent Application Program (ConApp) and welcomes applications from prospective students who wish to continue their education after active duty military service. Interested students should contact the Albion College Admissions Office or their Army recruiter for information on the ConApp program and related veteran's benefits for higher education. Albion guarantees admission to qualified ConApp applicants after military service.

Auditors -- A non-degree student may enroll as an official auditor. This obligates a student to attend classes and complete course requirements (papers, laboratory assignments, tests, and a final examination). The course appears on the transcript and the grade is posted, but no degree credit is earned.

Guest Students -- Albion College accepts a number of guest students. All guest students must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Guest students assume responsibility for determining whether the course they take at Albion will apply to their program of study.

Admission to Albion

Application for First-Year Admission

Admission to Albion College is selective and based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials, personal qualifications, and potential for success at the College. Albion admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, creed or national origin.

The Admission Committee reviews applications on an individual basis, paying particular attention to the unique qualities each candidate possesses. The committee considers the following factors in evaluating an applicant's credentials: rigor of curriculum pursued, grades, co-curricular involvement in high school, community and religious activities, letters of recommendation received, and results of the ACT or SAT college admission tests.

Candidates for admission are expected to graduate from an accredited high school or preparatory school and have at least 15 units of academic credit in the following subjects: English, mathematics, social science, science and foreign language. Albion College also welcomes students who have been home schooled or who have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). In both cases, students should contact the director of admission to develop a process to review non-traditional academic experiences and competencies.

Students may submit an application for admission at any time. Normally, however, students apply after September 1 of their senior year in high school. In order to receive equal consideration for admission and financial aid, students should apply and have all required credentials on file by March 1 of their senior year.

Each paper application form must be accompanied by a fee of $40. This is a processing fee which is non-refundable and is not credited on any subsequent payments to the College. Students who submit an online application on the College's Web site are not charged a fee. Albion also accepts the Common Application.

Applicants seeking fall admission must pay a $300 enrollment deposit to the College postmarked no later than May 1 to secure their place in the fall class.

Applicants seeking spring admission should submit their $300 deposit before January 10.

Early Action

Albion welcomes students to apply early to secure a place in the fall class, and to ensure full consideration for academic and special talent scholarships. Students who apply by December 1 will be notified of an admission decision by January 1. The early action process is non-binding. All students who apply after December 1 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be notified of an admission decision beginning February 1 until the class is filled.

Entrance Tests

Standardized entrance tests (ACT or SAT) are required. High school students should sit for the ACT or SAT exam no later than February of their senior year. Albion College's code number is 1007 for the SAT and 1956 for the ACT. Information about the SAT may be obtained from the College Board at www.collegeboard.org. Information about the ACT may be obtained at www.act.org.

Campus Visit

A visit to the campus and a personal interview are highly recommended. As a service to campus visitors, guided tours of the campus are provided. The admission staff will also arrange visits with faculty members or with specific academic departments.

The Admission Office is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It is also open on select Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon during the academic year.

Specific information pertaining to the curriculum, the faculty or admission to Albion College may be obtained from:

Admission Office
Albion College
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, Michigan 49224
Telephone: 800/858-6770
E-mail:
World Wide Web: http://www.albion.edu

Advanced Placement and CLEP

Albion College is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Under this program, a high school student who earns a grade of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement Examination automatically receives college credit and may receive advanced placement in the area of his or her proficiency.

A student who receives a grade of 3 may be given advanced placement, and at the discretion of the department, the student may be given college credit as well.

Some College departments also participate in the College-Level Subject Examination Program (CLEP) of CEEB. Albion College permits students to obtain a maximum of eight units of credit toward the bachelor of arts, and to fulfill core and/or major requirements through CLEP. Students should contact the Registrar's Office for information on which departments accept CLEP credit.

Maximum Credit Available Through Examination -- No more than eight units of credit can be obtained through any combination of locally designed departmental examinations and the College-Level Examination Program. No more than 12 units of credit can be obtained through any combination of the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and the College-Level Examination Program.

Immediate Sophomore Standing -- An entering student who presents six or more units obtained through the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and/or the College-Level Examination Program will obtain immediate sophomore standing.

Special Admissions

Transfer Students

Each year Albion accepts students who have attended other colleges or universities. It is recommended that candidates possess at least a 2.5 grade point average for consideration. It is expected that the applicant will be in good academic and social standing at the college last attended and that the previous college record has been strong enough to compare favorably with students already in attendance at Albion. Students are responsible for submitting, with their application, official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, along with an academic and social status supplement completed by the appropriate official from each institution previously attended.

Students with an official transcript marked "MACRAO approved" for an associate of arts (A.A.) degree from a Michigan community or junior college are exempt from taking the First-Year Seminar and the Modes of Inquiry requirement, and they may be admitted at the junior level. However, the following graduation requirements must be met: the category requirements and the writing competence requirement. A maximum of 16 units (64 semester hours) may be transferred from accredited junior colleges.

Candidates who transfer from an accredited four-year college must complete no less than the last 12 units (48 semester hours) in residence at Albion. These students must also complete all degree requirements including the category requirements and the writing competence requirement.

For more specific details regarding Albion's unit system and required course grades, refer to the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

International Students

To be considered for admission to Albion, an international student must complete the admission procedures including the following:

  • The Albion College International Application for Admission or Common Application for International Students.
  • Statement of Financial Support for International Students with supporting documents, i.e., bank statements, income/salary statements of parents or sponsors from their employers, and a financial support letter.
  • Personal statement/essay (one page minimum).
  • Original or certified copies of all academic records, secondary school transcripts, and college/university transcripts, translated into English and listing individual courses including types, number, and grades received. A minimum of at least three years of records will be required for students applying from four-year secondary institutions and a minimum of two years for students applying from three-year secondary institutions. In most cases, transfer students from colleges/universities outside the United States seeking admission to Albion College will require an external evaluation by World Education Services (WES) and Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) for transfer of college credits. Collegiate credits can be transferred at any time after the semester ends but will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the Albion College registrar.
  • Official scores of TOEFL, IELTS, ACT, SAT or ELS course 112 completion sent directly to Albion College from educational testing services. Albion College will also allow certified copies stamped by a school counselor or administrator.
  • Two letters of reference from the guidance counselor or headmaster, English teacher (or teacher of choice for English-speaking nations) or a community member from a club or service organization with which the student is affiliated.
  • Application fee of USD 40 is required for all international student applications. Applications will not be processed until the fee has been received. Please use the online payment form to make payment. Applicants may also send a certified bank check, or postal money order, in U.S. dollars, payable to Albion College. Please designate the check as “International Student Admission Application Fee.” Mail the payment to: Office of Admission, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224, U.S.A.

To ensure enough time to obtain a student visa, we advise students to complete the application package and send it to Albion College by April 1 for fall admission, October 1 for spring admission, or December 1 for early action. Late applications will be reviewed if space allows. Once Albion College has received the application materials, an admission decision is made within four weeks.

Financial Aid—American students at Albion College pay anywhere from half of the cost of their education up to the full cost. International students should consider an Albion education an investment the student, family and sponsors are willing to make. Few colleges and universities in the United States provide financial support to international students. International students often receive scholarships to Albion College, although our policies limit the maximum award for international students to 50 percent of the total cost of attendance.

Students who demonstrate the highest academic potential and bring significant co-curricular interests to our campus will receive the greatest consideration for these awards. In awarding scholarships, Albion College also considers an applicant's financial need upon review of the application, as well as other requirements.

Notification of a scholarship is made at the time of admission, and will be noted in the acceptance letter.

For further information about international student admission requirements, please contact:

Office of Admission
Albion College
c/o International Student Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, MI 49224
U.S.A.

International Baccalaureate -- The College recognizes the strength and rigor of the International Baccalaureate Program. Students will receive one unit (four semester hours) of credit for higher level passes with a score of 5 or more. Scores of 4 will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Normally, no more than four units (16 hours) of credit from this program will be awarded to an individual. Students must petition a department or the faculty Petitions Committee for exceptions to these limits.

Other Candidates

Veterans -- Veterans returning from military service and other eligible military personnel are admitted to Albion College under the training provisions established by the Veterans Administration. The College may allow credit for military service activities which have educational content to students who present acceptable military records. Such credentials should be submitted as part of the admission materials. Details about veteran's benefits under the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008 are available online.

ConApp -- Albion College is a participating college in the United States Army Concurrent Application Program (ConApp) and welcomes applications from prospective students who wish to continue their education after active duty military service. Interested students should contact the Albion College Admissions Office or their Army recruiter for information on the ConApp program and related veteran's benefits for higher education. Albion guarantees admission to qualified ConApp applicants after military service.

Auditors -- A non-degree student may enroll as an official auditor. This obligates a student to attend classes and complete course requirements (papers, laboratory assignments, tests, and a final examination). The course appears on the transcript and the grade is posted, but no degree credit is earned.

Guest Students -- Albion College accepts a number of guest students. All guest students must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Guest students assume responsibility for determining whether the course they take at Albion will apply to their program of study.

Admission to Albion

Application for First-Year Admission

Admission to Albion College is selective and based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials, personal qualifications, and potential for success at the College. Albion admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, creed or national origin.

The Admission Committee reviews applications on an individual basis, paying particular attention to the unique qualities each candidate possesses. The committee considers the following factors in evaluating an applicant's credentials: rigor of curriculum pursued, grades, co-curricular involvement in high school, community and religious activities, letters of recommendation received, and results of the ACT or SAT college admission tests.

Candidates for admission are expected to graduate from an accredited high school or preparatory school and have at least 15 units of academic credit in the following subjects: English, mathematics, social science, science and foreign language. Albion College also welcomes students who have been home schooled or who have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). In both cases, students should contact the director of admission to develop a process to review non-traditional academic experiences and competencies.

Students may submit an application for admission at any time. Normally, however, students apply after September 1 of their senior year in high school. In order to receive equal consideration for admission and financial aid, students should apply and have all required credentials on file by March 1 of their senior year.

Each paper application form must be accompanied by a fee of $40. This is a processing fee which is non-refundable and is not credited on any subsequent payments to the College. Students who submit an online application on the College's Web site are not charged a fee. Albion also accepts the Common Application.

Applicants seeking fall admission must pay a $300 enrollment deposit to the College postmarked no later than May 1 to secure their place in the fall class.

Applicants seeking spring admission should submit their $300 deposit before January 10.

Early Action

Albion welcomes students to apply early to secure a place in the fall class, and to ensure full consideration for academic and special talent scholarships. Students who apply by December 1 will be notified of an admission decision by January 1. The early action process is non-binding. All students who apply after December 1 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be notified of an admission decision beginning February 1 until the class is filled.

Entrance Tests

Standardized entrance tests (ACT or SAT) are required. High school students should sit for the ACT or SAT exam no later than February of their senior year. Albion College's code number is 1007 for the SAT and 1956 for the ACT. Information about the SAT may be obtained from the College Board at www.collegeboard.org. Information about the ACT may be obtained at www.act.org.

Campus Visit

A visit to the campus and a personal interview are highly recommended. As a service to campus visitors, guided tours of the campus are provided. The admission staff will also arrange visits with faculty members or with specific academic departments.

The Admission Office is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It is also open on select Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon during the academic year.

Specific information pertaining to the curriculum, the faculty or admission to Albion College may be obtained from:

Admission Office
Albion College
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, Michigan 49224
Telephone: 800/858-6770
E-mail:
Web: http://www.albion.edu

Advanced Placement and CLEP

Albion College is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Under this program, a high school student who earns a grade of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement Examination automatically receives college credit and may receive advanced placement in the area of his or her proficiency.

A student who receives a grade of 3 may be given advanced placement, and at the discretion of the department, the student may be given college credit as well.

Some College departments also participate in the College-Level Subject Examination Program (CLEP) of CEEB. Albion College permits students to obtain a maximum of eight units of credit toward the bachelor of arts, and to fulfill core and/or major requirements through CLEP. Students should contact the Registrar's Office for information on which departments accept CLEP credit.

Maximum Credit Available Through Examination -- No more than eight units of credit can be obtained through any combination of locally designed departmental examinations and the College-Level Examination Program. No more than 12 units of credit can be obtained through any combination of the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and the College-Level Examination Program.

Immediate Sophomore Standing -- An entering student who presents six or more units obtained through the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and/or the College-Level Examination Program will obtain immediate sophomore standing.

Special Admissions

Transfer Students

Each year Albion accepts students who have attended other colleges or universities. It is recommended that candidates possess at least a 2.5 grade point average for consideration. It is expected that the applicant will be in good academic and social standing at the college last attended and that the previous college record has been strong enough to compare favorably with students already in attendance at Albion. Students are responsible for submitting, with their application, official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, along with an academic and social status supplement completed by the appropriate official from each institution previously attended.

Students with an official transcript marked "MACRAO approved" for an associate of arts (A.A.) degree from a Michigan community or junior college are exempt from taking the First-Year Seminar and the Modes of Inquiry requirement, and they may be admitted at the junior level. However, the following graduation requirements must be met: the category requirements and the writing competence requirement. A maximum of 16 units (64 semester hours) may be transferred from accredited junior colleges.

Candidates who transfer from an accredited four-year college must complete no less than the last 12 units (48 semester hours) in residence at Albion. These students must also complete all degree requirements including the category requirements and the writing competence requirement.

For more specific details regarding Albion's unit system and required course grades, refer to the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

International Students

To be considered for admission to Albion, an international student must complete the admission procedures including the following:

  • The Albion College International Application for Admission or Common Application for International Students.
  • Statement of Financial Support for International Students with supporting documents, i.e., bank statements, income/salary statements of parents or sponsors from their employers, and a financial support letter.
  • Personal statement/essay (one page minimum).
  • Original or certified copies of all academic records, secondary school transcripts, and college/university transcripts, translated into English and listing individual courses including types, number, and grades received. A minimum of at least three years of records will be required for students applying from four-year secondary institutions and a minimum of two years for students applying from three-year secondary institutions. In most cases, transfer students from colleges/universities outside the United States seeking admission to Albion College will require an external evaluation by World Education Services (WES) and Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) for transfer of college credits. Collegiate credits can be transferred at any time after the semester ends but will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the Albion College registrar.
  • Official scores of TOEFL, IELTS, ACT, SAT or ELS course 112 completion sent directly to Albion College from educational testing services. Albion College will also allow certified copies stamped by a school counselor or administrator.
  • Two letters of reference from the guidance counselor or headmaster, English teacher (or teacher of choice for English-speaking nations) or a community member from a club or service organization with which the student is affiliated.
  • Application fee of USD 40 is required for all international student applications. Applications will not be processed until the fee has been received. Please use the online payment form to make payment. Applicants may also send a certified bank check, or postal money order, in U.S. dollars, payable to Albion College. Please designate the check as “International Student Admission Application Fee.” Mail the payment to: Office of Admission, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224, U.S.A.

To ensure enough time to obtain a student visa, we advise students to complete the application package and send it to Albion College by April 1 for fall admission, October 1 for spring admission, or December 1 for early action. Late applications will be reviewed if space allows. Once Albion College has received the application materials, an admission decision is made within four weeks.

Financial Aid—American students at Albion College pay anywhere from half of the cost of their education up to the full cost. International students should consider an Albion education an investment the student, family and sponsors are willing to make. Few colleges and universities in the United States provide financial support to international students. International students often receive scholarships to Albion College, although our policies limit the maximum award for international students to 50 percent of the total cost of attendance.

Students who demonstrate the highest academic potential and bring significant co-curricular interests to our campus will receive the greatest consideration for these awards. In awarding scholarships, Albion College also considers an applicant's financial need upon review of the application, as well as other requirements.

Notification of a scholarship is made at the time of admission, and will be noted in the acceptance letter.

For further information about international student admission requirements, please contact:

Office of Admission
Albion College
c/o International Student Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, MI 49224
U.S.A.

International Baccalaureate -- The College recognizes the strength and rigor of the International Baccalaureate Program. Students will receive one unit (four semester hours) of credit for higher level passes with a score of 5 or more. Scores of 4 will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Normally, no more than four units (16 hours) of credit from this program will be awarded to an individual. Students must petition a department or the faculty Petitions Committee for exceptions to these limits.

Other Candidates

Veterans -- Veterans returning from military service and other eligible military personnel are admitted to Albion College under the training provisions established by the Veterans Administration. The College may allow credit for military service activities which have educational content to students who present acceptable military records. Such credentials should be submitted as part of the admission materials. Details about veteran's benefits under the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008 are available online.

ConApp -- Albion College is a participating college in the United States Army Concurrent Application Program (ConApp) and welcomes applications from prospective students who wish to continue their education after active duty military service. Interested students should contact the Albion College Admissions Office or their Army recruiter for information on the ConApp program and related veteran's benefits for higher education. Albion guarantees admission to qualified ConApp applicants after military service.

Auditors -- A non-degree student may enroll as an official auditor. This obligates a student to attend classes and complete course requirements (papers, laboratory assignments, tests, and a final examination). The course appears on the transcript and the grade is posted, but no degree credit is earned.

Guest Students -- Albion College accepts a number of guest students. All guest students must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Guest students assume responsibility for determining whether the course they take at Albion will apply to their program of study.

Admission to Albion

Application for First-Year Admission

Admission to Albion College is selective and based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials, personal qualifications, and potential for success at the College. Albion admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, creed or national origin.

The Admission Committee reviews applications on an individual basis, paying particular attention to the unique qualities each candidate possesses. The committee considers the following factors in evaluating an applicant's credentials: rigor of curriculum pursued, grades, co-curricular involvement in high school, community and religious activities, letters of recommendation received, and results of the ACT or SAT college admission tests.

Candidates for admission are expected to graduate from an accredited high school or preparatory school and have at least 15 units of academic credit in the following subjects: English, mathematics, social science, science and foreign language. Albion College also welcomes students who have been home schooled or who have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). In both cases, students should contact the director of admission to develop a process to review non-traditional academic experiences and competencies.

Students may submit an application for admission at any time. Normally, however, students apply after October of their senior year in high school. In order to receive equal consideration for admission and financial aid, students should apply and have all required credentials on file by February 1 of their senior year.

Students who submit an online application on the College's Web site are not charged a fee. Albion also accepts the Common Application.

Applicants seeking fall admission must pay a $350 enrollment deposit to the College postmarked no later than May 1 to secure their place in the fall class.

Applicants seeking spring admission should submit their $350 deposit before January 10.

Early Action

Albion welcomes students to apply early to secure a place in the fall class, and to ensure full consideration for academic and special talent scholarships. Students who apply by November 1 or December 1 will be notified of an admission decision by January 15. The early action process is non-binding. All students who apply after December 1 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be notified of an admission decision beginning February 1 until the class is filled.

Entrance Tests

Standardized entrance tests (ACT or SAT) are required. High school students should sit for the ACT or SAT exam no later than February of their senior year. Albion College's code number is 1007 for the SAT and 1956 for the ACT. Information about the SAT may be obtained from the College Board at www.collegeboard.org. Information about the ACT may be obtained at www.act.org.

Campus Visit

A visit to the campus and a personal interview are highly recommended. As a service to campus visitors, guided tours of the campus are provided. The admission staff will also arrange visits with faculty members or with specific academic departments.

The Admission Office is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It is also open on select Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12 noon during the academic year.

Specific information pertaining to the curriculum, the faculty or admission to Albion College may be obtained from:

Albion College
Office of Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, Michigan 49224
Telephone: 800/858-6770
E-mail:
Web: http://www.albion.edu

Advanced Placement and CLEP

Albion College is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Under this program, a high school student who earns a grade of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement Examination automatically receives college credit and may receive advanced placement in the area of his or her proficiency.

A student who receives a grade of 3 may be given advanced placement, and at the discretion of the department, the student may be given college credit as well.

Some College departments also participate in the College-Level Subject Examination Program (CLEP) of CEEB. Albion College permits students to obtain a maximum of eight units of credit toward the bachelor of arts, and to fulfill core and/or major requirements through CLEP. Students should contact the Registrar's Office for information on which departments accept CLEP credit.

Maximum Credit Available Through Examination—No more than eight units of credit can be obtained through any combination of locally designed departmental examinations and the College-Level Examination Program. No more than 12 units of credit can be obtained through any combination of the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and the College-Level Examination Program.

Immediate Sophomore Standing—An entering student who presents six or more units obtained through the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and/or the College-Level Examination Program will obtain immediate sophomore standing.

Special Admissions

Transfer Students

Each year Albion accepts students who have attended other colleges or universities. It is recommended that candidates possess at least a 3.0 grade point average for consideration. It is expected that the applicant will be in good academic and social standing at the college last attended and that the previous college record has been strong enough to compare favorably with students already in attendance at Albion. Students are responsible for submitting, with their application, official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, along with an academic and social status supplement completed by the appropriate official from each institution previously attended.

Students with an official transcript marked "MACRAO approved" for an associate of arts (A.A.) degree from a Michigan community or junior college are exempt from taking the First-Year Seminar and the Modes of Inquiry requirement, and they may be admitted at the junior level. However, the following graduation requirements must be met: the category requirements and the writing competence requirement. A maximum of 16 units (64 semester hours) may be transferred from accredited junior colleges.

Candidates who transfer from an accredited four-year college must complete no less than the last 12 units (48 semester hours) in residence at Albion. These students must also complete all degree requirements including the category requirements and the writing competence requirement.

For more specific details regarding Albion's unit system and required course grades, refer to the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

International Students

To be considered for admission to Albion, an international student must complete the admission procedures including the following:

  • The Albion College International Application for Admission or Common Application for International Students.
  • Statement of Financial Support for International Students with supporting documents, i.e., bank statements, income/salary statements of parents or sponsors from their employers, and a financial support letter.
  • Personal statement/essay (one page minimum).
  • Original or certified copies of all academic records, secondary school transcripts, and college/university transcripts, translated into English and listing individual courses including types, number, and grades received. A minimum of at least three years of records will be required for students applying from four-year secondary institutions and a minimum of two years for students applying from three-year secondary institutions. In most cases, transfer students from colleges/universities outside the United States seeking admission to Albion College will require an external evaluation by World Education Services (WES) and Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) for transfer of college credits. Collegiate credits can be transferred at any time after the semester ends but will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the Albion College registrar.
  • Official scores of TOEFL, IELTS, ACT, SAT or ELS course 112 completion sent directly to Albion College from educational testing services. Albion College will also allow certified copies stamped by a school counselor or administrator.
  • Two letters of reference from the guidance counselor or headmaster, English teacher (or teacher of choice for English-speaking nations) or a community member from a club or service organization with which the student is affiliated.

To ensure enough time to obtain a student visa, we advise students to complete the application package and send it to Albion College by February 1 for fall admission, October 1 for spring admission, or December 1 for early action. Late applications will be reviewed if space allows. Once Albion College has received the application materials, an admission decision is made within four weeks.

Financial Aid—International students should consider an Albion education an investment the student, family and sponsors are willing to make. Few colleges and universities in the United States provide financial support to international students. International students often receive scholarships to Albion College, although our policies limit the maximum award for international students to 50 percent of the total cost of attendance.

Students who demonstrate the highest academic potential and bring significant co-curricular interests to our campus will receive the greatest consideration for these awards. In awarding scholarships, Albion College also considers an applicant's financial need upon review of the application, as well as other requirements.

Notification of a scholarship is made at the time of admission, and will be noted in the acceptance letter.

For further information about international student admission requirements, please contact:

Office of Admission
Albion College
c/o International Student Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, MI 49224
U.S.A.

International Baccalaureate—The College recognizes the strength and rigor of the International Baccalaureate Program. Students will receive one unit (four semester hours) of credit for IB courses/tests taken at the highest level with a score of 5 or more.

Other Candidates

Veterans—Veterans returning from military service and other eligible military personnel are admitted to Albion College under the training provisions established by the Veterans Administration. The College may allow credit for military service activities which have educational content to students who present acceptable military records. Such credentials should be submitted as part of the admission materials. Details about veteran's benefits under the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008 are available online.

ConApp—Albion College is a participating college in the United States Army Concurrent Application Program (ConApp) and welcomes applications from prospective students who wish to continue their education after active duty military service. Interested students should contact the Albion College Admissions Office or their Army recruiter for information on the ConApp program and related veteran's benefits for higher education. Albion guarantees admission to qualified ConApp applicants after military service.

Auditors—A non-degree student may enroll as an official auditor. This obligates a student to attend classes and complete course requirements (papers, laboratory assignments, tests, and a final examination). The course appears on the transcript and the grade is posted, but no degree credit is earned.

Guest Students—To be admitted as a guest student at Albion College students must complete the Michigan Undergraduate Guest Application. All guest students must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Guest students assume responsibility for determining whether the course they take at Albion will apply to their program of study.

Admission to Albion

Application for First-Year Admission

Admission to Albion College is selective and based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials, personal qualifications, and potential for success at the College. Albion admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, creed or national origin.

The Admission Committee reviews applications on an individual basis, paying particular attention to the unique qualities each candidate possesses. The committee considers the following factors in evaluating an applicant's credentials: rigor of curriculum pursued, grades, co-curricular involvement in high school, community and religious activities, letters of recommendation received, and results of the ACT or SAT college admission tests.

Candidates for admission are expected to graduate from an accredited high school or preparatory school and have at least 15 units of academic credit in the following subjects: English, mathematics, social science, science and foreign language. Albion College also welcomes students who have been home schooled or who have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). In both cases, students should contact the director of admission to develop a process to review non-traditional academic experiences and competencies.

Students may submit an application for admission at any time. Normally, however, students apply after October of their senior year in high school. In order to receive equal consideration for admission and financial aid, students should apply and have all required credentials on file by February 1 of their senior year.

Students who submit an online application are not charged a fee. Albion only accepts the Common Application.

Applicants seeking fall admission must pay a $350 enrollment deposit to the College postmarked no later than May 1 to secure their place in the fall class.

Applicants seeking spring admission should submit their $350 deposit before January 10.

Early Action

Albion welcomes students to apply early to secure a place in the fall class, and to ensure full consideration for academic and special talent scholarships. Students who apply by November 1 or December 1 will be notified of an admission decision by January 15. The early action process is non-binding. All students who apply after December 1 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be notified of an admission decision beginning February 1 until the class is filled.

Entrance Tests

Standardized entrance tests (ACT or SAT) are required. High school students should sit for the ACT or SAT exam no later than February of their senior year. Albion College's code number is 1007 for the SAT and 1956 for the ACT. Information about the SAT may be obtained from the College Board at www.collegeboard.org. Information about the ACT may be obtained at www.act.org.

Campus Visit

A visit to the campus and a personal interview are highly recommended. As a service to campus visitors, guided tours of the campus are provided. The admission staff will also arrange visits with faculty members or with specific academic departments.

The Admission Office is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It is also open on select Saturdays during the academic year.

Specific information pertaining to the curriculum, the faculty or admission to Albion College may be obtained from:

Albion College
Office of Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, Michigan 49224
Telephone: 800/858-6770
E-mail:
Web: http://www.albion.edu

Advanced Placement and CLEP

Albion College is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Under this program, a high school student who earns a grade of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement Examination automatically receives college credit and may receive advanced placement in the area of his or her proficiency.

Some College departments also participate in the College-Level Subject Examination Program (CLEP) of CEEB. Albion College permits students to obtain a maximum of eight units of credit toward the bachelor of arts, and to fulfill core and/or major requirements through CLEP. Students should contact the Registrar's Office for information on which departments accept CLEP credit.

Maximum Credit Available Through Examination—No more than eight units of credit can be obtained through any combination of locally designed departmental examinations and the College-Level Examination Program. No more than 12 units of credit can be obtained through any combination of the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and the College-Level Examination Program.

Immediate Sophomore Standing—An entering student who presents six or more units obtained through the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and/or the College-Level Examination Program will obtain immediate sophomore standing.

Special Admissions

Transfer Students

Each year Albion accepts students who have attended other colleges or universities. It is recommended that candidates possess at least a 3.0 grade point average for consideration. It is expected that the applicant will be in good academic and social standing at the college last attended and that the previous college record has been strong enough to compare favorably with students already in attendance at Albion. Students are responsible for submitting, with their application, official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, along with an academic and social status supplement completed by the appropriate official from each institution previously attended.

Students with an official transcript marked "MACRAO approved" for an associate of arts (A.A.) degree from a Michigan community or junior college are exempt from taking the First-Year Seminar and the Modes of Inquiry requirement, and they may be admitted at the junior level. However, the following graduation requirements must be met: the category requirements and the writing competence requirement. A maximum of 16 units (64 semester hours) may be transferred from accredited junior colleges.

Candidates who transfer from an accredited four-year college must complete no less than the last 12 units (48 semester hours) in residence at Albion. These students must also complete all degree requirements including the category requirements and the writing competence requirement.

For more specific details regarding Albion's unit system and required course grades, refer to the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

International Students

To be considered for admission to Albion, an international student must complete the admission procedures including the following:

  • Common Application for International Students.
  • Statement of Financial Support for International Students with supporting documents, i.e., bank statements, income/salary statements of parents or sponsors from their employers, and a financial support letter.
  • Personal statement/essay (one page minimum).
  • Original or certified copies of all academic records, secondary school transcripts, and college/university transcripts, translated into English and listing individual courses including types, number, and grades received. A minimum of at least three years of records will be required for students applying from four-year secondary institutions and a minimum of two years for students applying from three-year secondary institutions. In most cases, transfer students from colleges/universities outside the United States seeking admission to Albion College will require an external evaluation by World Education Services (WES) and Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) for transfer of college credits. Collegiate credits can be transferred at any time after the semester ends but will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the Albion College registrar.
  • Official scores of TOEFL, IELTS, ACT, SAT or ELS course 112 completion sent directly to Albion College from educational testing services. Albion College will also allow certified copies stamped by a school counselor or administrator.
  • Two letters of reference from the guidance counselor or headmaster, English teacher (or teacher of choice for English-speaking nations) or a community member from a club or service organization with which the student is affiliated.

To ensure enough time to obtain a student visa, we advise students to complete the application package and send it to Albion College by February 1 for fall admission, October 1 for spring admission, or December 1 for early action. Late applications will be reviewed if space allows. Once Albion College has received the application materials, an admission decision is made within four weeks.

Financial Aid—International students should consider an Albion education an investment the student, family and sponsors are willing to make. Few colleges and universities in the United States provide financial support to international students. International students often receive scholarships to Albion College, although our policies limit the maximum award for international students to 50 percent of the total cost of attendance.

Students who demonstrate the highest academic potential and bring significant co-curricular interests to our campus will receive the greatest consideration for these awards. In awarding scholarships, Albion College also considers an applicant's financial need upon review of the application, as well as other requirements.

Notification of a scholarship is made at the time of admission, and will be noted in the acceptance letter.

For further information about international student admission requirements, please contact:

Office of Admission
Albion College
c/o International Student Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, MI 49224
U.S.A.

International Baccalaureate—The College recognizes the strength and rigor of the International Baccalaureate Program. Students will receive one unit (four semester hours) of credit for IB courses/tests taken at the highest level with a score of 5 or more.

Other Candidates

Veterans—Veterans returning from military service and other eligible military personnel are admitted to Albion College under the training provisions established by the Veterans Administration. The College may allow credit for military service activities which have educational content to students who present acceptable military records. Such credentials should be submitted as part of the admission materials. Details about veteran's benefits under the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008 are available online.

ConApp—Albion College is a participating college in the United States Army Concurrent Application Program (ConApp) and welcomes applications from prospective students who wish to continue their education after active duty military service. Interested students should contact the Albion College Admissions Office or their Army recruiter for information on the ConApp program and related veteran's benefits for higher education. Albion guarantees admission to qualified ConApp applicants after military service.

Auditors—A non-degree student may enroll as an official auditor. This obligates a student to attend classes and complete course requirements (papers, laboratory assignments, tests, and a final examination). The course appears on the transcript and the grade is posted, but no degree credit is earned.

Guest Students—To be admitted as a guest student at Albion College students must complete the Michigan Undergraduate Guest Application. All guest students must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Guest students assume responsibility for determining whether the course they take at Albion will apply to their program of study.

Appendix: Privacy Rights Policy

Albion College Policy on The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (The Act) of 1974 (as amended) is a federal law which states (a) that a written institutional policy must be established and (b) that a statement of adopted procedures covering the privacy rights of students be made available. The Act provides that the institution will maintain the confidentiality of student educational records and access to them by students.

FERPA Definition of Records

The Act defines education records as records, files, documents and other recorded materials which contain information directly related to a student and which are maintained by Albion College or a person acting for the College. The term education record does not include records of instructional, supervisory and administrative personnel and educational personnel ancillary thereto that are in the sole possession of the maker thereof and which are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a substitute; records on a student who is 18 years of age or older that are created or maintained by a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist or other recognized professional or paraprofessional acting in a professional or paraprofessional capacity, or assisting in that capacity and in connection with the provision of treatment to the student, and are not available to anyone other than persons providing such treatment, provided, however, that such records can be personally reviewed by a physician or other appropriate professional of the student's choice; records of students as employees unless the employment results from the employee's status as a student; and alumni records.

Access to Records

FERPA accords all the rights under the Act to all students at the College. This includes the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. Albion College will make disclosures without consent in the following circumstances.

  • To school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or support staff position (including law enforcement unit and health staff); a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as a company providing services with respect to financial aid awards, or other administrative support and research services, including those related to student testing and retention; an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a person assisting another school official in performing his/her tasks (such as employment responsibility). A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his/her professional responsibility.
  • Upon request to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
  • To persons or organizations providing students financial aid.
  • To accrediting agencies carrying out their accreditation function.
  • To persons in an emergency in order to protect the health or safety of students or other persons.

Albion College will also release information to be in compliance with a judicial order; this release will occur only after an attempt has been made to contact the student at the last known permanent address.

Under certain circumstances information will be released to parent(s)/guardian(s). On an annual basis, students are expected to notify the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs whether or not, for tax purposes, students are dependents claimed on the income tax return of their parent(s)/guardian(s). The vice president for student affairs will facilitate this notification process. A representative of the College may communicate with parent(s)/guardian(s) relative to the following circumstances: discontinuance of enrollment; medical (including psychiatric) examinations required for the maintenance of enrollment as determined by the vice president for student affairs; alleged violation of a College regulation that will likely result in suspension or expulsion from the College if the student is found responsible; absence from the campus when there is reason to be concerned for the student's well-being because the student's whereabouts are unknown; academic or disciplinary probation; needed medical or psychological attention, the nature of which might jeopardize a student's ability to maintain the status of enrolled. Parent(s) or guardian(s) in these cases will be defined as the individual the student has recorded as the parent(s) or guardian(s) on the admissions application. A student may change this designation at any time at the Registrar's Office.

A listing of the types, locations and custodians of education records follows.

The rights of this policy are extended to all students enrolling in Albion College after January 1, 1975.

Directory Information

At its discretion the College may provide directory information in accordance with the provisions of the Act to include: name, permanent address, name of parent(s)/guardian(s), local address, Albion College e-mail address, local telephone number, dates of enrollment, class year, majors, minors, concentrations, adviser, degrees earned, dates of degrees, awards/honors/scholarships, sports and activities, and height and weight of members of athletic teams. It should be known that it is the College's choice to release this information, and careful consideration is given to all requests to insure that the information is not released indiscriminately. A student may withhold directory information by notifying the Registrar's Office in writing within two weeks after the first day of class for the fall term.

Requests for non-disclosure will be honored by the institution for only one academic year; therefore, authorization to withhold directory information must be filed annually in the Registrar's Office.

A record of all disclosures will be maintained in the student record, except when the request is made by (1) the eligible student, (2) a school official who has been determined to have a legitimate educational interest, (3) a party with written consent from the eligible student, or (4) a party seeking directory information. The record of each disclosure will contain the name of the parties who have requested or received information and the legitimate interest the parties had in requesting or obtaining the information.

Review Process

The Act provides students with the right to inspect and review information contained in their educational records, to challenge the contents of their educational records, to have a hearing if the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory, and to submit explanatory statements for inclusion in their files if they feel the decisions of the hearing panel to be unacceptable. The Registrar's Office and the Vice President for Student Affairs' Office have been designated by the institution to coordinate the inspection and review procedures for student educational records, which include admissions, personnel, academic and financial files, and placement records. Students wishing to review their education records must make written requests to the registrar or the vice president for student affairs, listing the item or items of interest. Records covered by the Act will be made available within 45 days of the request. All documents will be reviewed in the presence of a designated official. Any document a student may see he may have copies of, unless a financial hold exists, the document involves another person, or the student has waived his or her right to access. These copies would be made at the student's expense at 10 cents a page.

Restricted Information

As outlined by the Act, a student may not inspect and review the following: financial information submitted by parent(s)/guardian(s); letters of recommendation to which the student has waived the rights of inspection and review; or education records containing information about more than one student, in which case the institution will permit access only to that part of the record which pertains to the inquiring student. The institution is not required to permit a student to inspect and review confidential letters and recommendations placed in the files prior to January 1, 1975, provided the letters were collected under established policies of confidentiality and were used only for the purposes for which they were collected.

Challenge Procedures

A student who believes that the education records contain information that is inaccurate or misleading or otherwise in violation of his/her privacy or other rights may ask the College to amend a record. The student should write the College official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record he/she wants changed, and specify why the student believes it is inaccurate or misleading. The College official should consult with the vice president for student affairs or the registrar. If the decisions of the College official are in agreement with the student's request, the appropriate record will be amended. If not, the student will be notified within a reasonable period of time that the record will not be amended, and the student will be informed by the registrar or the vice president for student affairs of the right to a formal hearing. A request for a formal hearing must be made in writing to the chief academic officer (vice president for academic affairs), who, within a reasonable period of time after receiving such request, will inform the student of the date, place and time of the hearing. Such a written request will be deemed a consent to disclosure to the hearing panel of the student's records to the extent necessary for the appeal to be considered and decided. The hearing will be conducted according to the challenge procedure adopted by the College. At the hearing, the student may present evidence relevant to the issues raised and may be assisted or represented by not more than two people of the student's choice. The hearing panel that will adjudicate such challenges will be the chief academic officer (vice president for academic affairs), the registrar if the challenge concerns a document maintained by the vice president for student affairs, the vice president for student affairs if the challenge concerns a document maintained by the registrar, two faculty members selected by the Faculty Steering Committee and two student members selected by Student Senate. No member of the hearing panel may have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing.

Decisions of the hearing panel will be final, will be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing, and will consist of a written determination that will include a summary of the evidence, the decision, and the reasons for the decisions, and will be delivered to all parties concerned. The panel may decide to revise or amend a record by inserting corrective information into the student's file, or to allow a record to stand. If the decision is unsatisfactory to the student, the student may place with the education record statements commenting on the information in the record or statements setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decisions of the hearing panels. The statements will be placed in the education record, maintained as part of the student record, and released whenever the record in question is disclosed.

A student has the right to submit a written complaint to the Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-4605, if the student believes the College has violated the student's right under the Family Education Rights
and Privacy Act.

Revisions, clarifications and changes may be made in this policy at any time and will be effective upon publication by e-mail, printed announcement distributed to all students, posting in a prominent location on campus, or any combination of those means, or publication in subsequent editions of the Student Handbook.

Annual Notification

Students will be notified of their FERPA rights annually by publication in the Student Handbook.

Types, Locations and Custodians of Records

The following is a list of the types of records that the College maintains,
their locations and their custodians.

Types Location Custodian
Admissions Records Vice President for Student Affairs
Ferguson Building
Vice President
Cumulative Academic
Records
Registrar's Office
Ferguson Building
Registrar
Health Records Student Health Services
Cass Street Building
Director
Counseling Records Counseling Services
616 E. Michigan Ave.
Director
Financial Aid Records Office of Financial Aid
Ferguson Building
Director
Financial Records Accounting Office
Ferguson Building
Accounting
Manager
Placement Records Career Development
Ferguson Building
Director
Progress Records Registrar's Office
Ferguson Building
Registrar
Faculty Office
Individual Office
Instructor, Adviser
Disciplinary Records Vice President for Student Affairs
Ferguson Building
Vice President
Occasional Records (Student education records not included in the types above such as minutes of faculty committee meetings, copies of correspondence in offices not listed, etc.) Appropriate official will collect such records, direct the student to their location, or otherwise make them available for inspection and review The College official who maintains such occasional records

Academic Honors and Activities

Albion encourages students to expand their experience both inside and outside of the classroom. A wide range of extra-curricular and co-curricular activities provide recreational and educational opportunities for all students. These include honor societies, honorary organizations, departmental clubs, off-campus study, interdisciplinary courses, performing arts, and more. In addition, Albion provides a complete intramural and varsity athletic program which is described in the Student Life section of this catalog.

Academic Honors

Dean's Honor List -- Those full-time students whose grade point average is 3.5 or above at the completion of a semester are named to the Dean's List issued at the close of each semester. To qualify, students must take at least three units in graded courses and successfully complete four units. All course work must be completed on the Albion College campus.

Departmental Honors -- Qualified departmental majors may present papers to be considered for departmental honors. Normally such students will have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher in their major department and will have conducted the work as part of a directed study. A student whose GPA is lower than 3.0, but whose work promises a thesis of high quality, may petition the major department for permission to submit a thesis. A student whose thesis is accepted by the department will graduate with "departmental honors."

Graduation Recognition -- Three grades of recognition are conferred at graduation. For students graduating in 2006 and after, cum laude is granted to those who have a grade point average of 3.5 to 3.749; magna cum laude is granted to those who have a grade point average of 3.75 to 3.899; and summa cum laude is granted to those who have a grade point average of 3.9 or above. A student must complete at least three semesters of study at Albion College to be considered for graduation recognition.

Graduation Honors -- Students who successfully complete Albion's Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute and maintain a grade point average of 3.5 will graduate "with Albion College honors.''

Honor Societies

Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest of the national honorary societies, founded in 1776. The Beta chapter of Michigan was established at Albion in 1940. Members are usually seniors in the top 10 percent of their graduating class who meet the chapter's liberal studies and residency requirements.

Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, was founded in 1866 as an honor society for scientists and engineers. The Albion chapter, started in 1959, includes faculty and students who are involved in scientific research. Students who have done research at Albion or in an approved off-campus program and who anticipate a career in science are eligible for nomination as associate members.

Albion College Fellows have attained a 3.7 average for three successive semesters on campus. They must also take at least three units in graded courses and successfully complete four units each semester. Participation in an approved off-campus program does not prevent students from qualifying at the end of the semester after they return.

Mortar Board, a national honorary, was established at Albion in 1941 to honor women who have been outstanding in scholarship, leadership and service. In 1976 the Albion chapter voted to make its membership coeducational.

Omicron Delta Kappa, national leadership honorary, was established at Albion in 1942 to honor juniors and seniors who have actively contributed to campus life and scholarship.

Alpha Lambda Delta, national freshman scholastic honorary, recognizes students who have received a 3.5 average at the end of their first semester or have an accumulative 3.5 at the end of their freshman year, based on at least three units of graded courses per semester. Alpha Lambda Delta was established at Albion in 1940.

Departmental Honoraries and Clubs

Many academic departments of the College sponsor honoraries in recognition of high scholarship. Minimum requirements for membership in these honoraries usually include: a departmental grade average of 3.0; an all-College grade average of 2.5; a major or minor in the respective department; and sophomore standing, although second semester freshmen are eligible in very unusual cases. The departments and their respective organizations include:

Biology -- Beta Beta Beta (national)
Chemistry -- Fall Chemistry Club
Economics -- Omicron Delta Epsilon (national)
English -- Joseph J. Irwin Honorary Society
Geology -- Sigma Gamma Epsilon (national)
History -- Phi Alpha Theta (national)
Mathematics -- Kappa Mu Epsilon (national)
Music -- Pi Kappa Lambda (national)
Physics -- Sigma Pi Sigma (national)
Political Science -- Pi Sigma Alpha (national)
Psychology -- Psi Chi (national)
Public Policy -- Pi Sigma Sigma (national)
Sociology -- Alpha Kappa Delta (national)

Many departments also have their own clubs designed to encourage interest and to supplement the work in the classroom.

Departmental awards are given on a broad range of criteria to students in the form of prizes, honors and other distinctions. Students are urged to familiarize themselves with the awards by contacting the respective departmental chair.

Scholarships and Fellowships for International Study

The national scholarships and fellowships listed below assist students who wish to study and/or conduct research abroad. Because the selection process for these awards is highly competitive, students are strongly encouraged to consult with the campus advisers for these programs during the application process.

Freeman-ASIA�The primary goal of the Freeman-ASIA Program is to increase the number of U.S. undergraduates who study in East and Southeast Asia by providing students with the information and financial assistance they will need. Awardees are expected to share their experiences with their home campus to encourage study abroad by others and to spread understanding of Asia in their home communities. For more information, see http://www.iie.org/.

Fulbright Grants�Congress created the Fulbright program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Each year, the Fulbright program enables U.S. students, artists and other professionals to study or conduct research in more than 100 nations. The program offers Fulbright full grants, Fulbright travel grants, foreign and private grants and teaching opportunities. Brochures, application forms and information are available from the Office of International Education or the Fulbright campus adviser, Gene Cline, Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute. The campus application deadline is Oct. 1. For more information, see http://www.cies.org/.

Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program�The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program reduces barriers to study abroad by providing assistance to those undergraduate students who have demonstrated financial need. This program offers a competition for awards for study abroad, for U.S. citizens who are receiving federal Pell Grant funding. Pell recipients planning to study abroad should also apply for a Gilman Scholarship. This congressionally funded program is offered through the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State and is administered by the Institute of International Education. Selected by competition, recipients are awarded up to $5,000 to defray the costs associated with studying abroad. For more information, see http://www.iie.org//programs/gilman/index.html.

British Marshall Scholarships�Established by an act of Parliament in 1953 to commemorate the ideals of the European Recovery Programme (the Marshall Plan), the British Marshall scholarships are intended to enable "intellectually distinguished young Americans to study in the United Kingdom and thereby to gain an understanding and appreciation of the British way of life." Applications must be submitted on prescribed forms available by mid-May from the Office of International Education or the Marshall campus adviser, Alfred Pheley, Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service. The campus application deadline is Oct. 1. For more information, see http://www.marshallscholarship.org/.

NSEP Scholarships�Established by the National Security Education Act of 1991, NSEP scholarships aim to provide U.S. undergraduate students with the resources and encouragement they need to acquire expertise in languages, cultures and countries less commonly taught in the United States. NSEP scholarships can be applied for study in all countries except Western Europe, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Applications can be obtained from the Office of International Education or the NSEP campus adviser. The campus application deadline is Dec. 1. For more information, see http://www.iie.org/programs/nsep/default.htm.

Rhodes Scholarship�The Rhodes scholarship provides for study at Oxford University and is one of the most competitive awards available. Applicants must demonstrate outstanding intellectual and academic achievement, but they must also be able to show integrity of character, interest in and respect for their fellow beings, the ability to lead and the energy to use their talents to the fullest. Forms and information are available from the Office of International Education or the Rhodes campus adviser, Geoffrey Cocks, Department of History. The campus application deadline is Oct. 1. For more information, see http://www.rhodesscholar.org/.

Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarships�The primary purpose of this program is to further international understanding and friendly relations among people of different countries. Scholarship applications need to be made more than a year in advance of the planned study abroad program experience. Rotary awards provide for all expenses of most semester and year-long study-abroad programs. For more information, see http://www.rotary.org/foundation/educational/amb_scho/.

Information on other study-abroad scholarships may be obtained in the Center for International Education.

Scholarships and Fellowships for Study in the United States

The scholarships and fellowships listed below are awarded nationally to undergraduate students who wish to continue their studies in the areas specified by the respective program. Because the selection process for these awards is highly competitive, students are strongly encouraged to consult with the campus advisers for these programs during the application process.

Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Scholarship Program�The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation provides scholarships to college seniors or recent college graduates of high need to enable them to attend graduate or professional schools. Approximately 65 of these scholarships are awarded annually. In order to apply, you must be nominated by our campus representative, Gene Cline, Department of Philosophy. For more information, see http://www.jkcf.org/scholarships

Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship�The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program �was established by Congress in 1986 to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater, who served his country for 56 years as a soldier and statesman.� The purpose of the foundation is to develop highly qualified scientists, mathematicians and engineers by awarding scholarships to college students who intend to pursue careers in these fields. For more information, contact the Goldwater campus representative, Dean McCurdy, Department of Biology, or see http://www.act.org/goldwater/.

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships�The program recognizes and supports graduate students pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. "NSF Fellows are expected to become knowledge experts who can contribute significantly to research, teaching and innovations in science and engineering." For more information, go to: http://www.nsfgradfellows.org/.

Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program�Outstanding students who are interested in pursuing a foreign service career with the U.S. Department of State may apply for a Pickering fellowship during their sophomore year. The fellowship award includes tuition, room, board and mandatory fees during the junior and senior years of college and during the first year of graduate study with reimbursement for books and round trip travel. The fellow must commit to pursuing a graduate degree in international studies at one of the graduate schools identified by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Fellows meet annually in Washington, D.C., for a program orientation. Only U.S. citizens will be considered for the Pickering fellowships. Women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and students with financial need are encouraged to apply. For more information, see http://www.woodrow.org/fellowships/index.php.

Harry S. Truman Scholarship�These awards go to college juniors with �exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education or elsewhere in the public service. . . .� Approximately 80 awards are given annually for support in graduate school. For more information, contact the campus adviser, Alfred Pheley, Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service, or go to http://www.truman.gov/index.htm.

Morris K. Udall Undergraduate Scholarship�These highly competitive scholarships are awarded to college sophomores and juniors who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment or who are Native American or Alaska Native and have demonstrated commitment to careers related to tribal public policy or health care. Interested students should prepare to apply at least a year in advance of the application deadline. Forms and information are available from the Udall campus representative, Timothy Lincoln, Department of Geological Sciences. For more information, see http://www.udall.gov/udall.asp?link=200.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be required to withdraw from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing -- A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation -- A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation -- A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation -- Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. A student who fails to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation may be subject to required academic withdrawal.

Required Academic Withdrawal -- A student is subject to academic withdrawal if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic withdrawal if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds -- The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements -- A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence -- Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College -- Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission -- Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $50.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status) -- Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admissions Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Trustees

Frederick M. Adams, chairman-Michigan, Northern Trust Bank, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2011 T).

Carolyn E. Aishton, vice president, corporate programs (retired), Avon Products, Inc., New York, New York (2010 T). *Vice chairman for nominations.

Robert A. Armitage, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Indiana (2009 T).

Daniel Boggan, Jr., chief operating officer (retired), National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, Indiana (2011 T).  *Vice chairman for buildings and grounds.

Meagan C. Burton, graduate assistant to the associate provost, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont (2009 R).

Diane S. Carr, attorney, Brookover and Carr, Lansing, Michigan (2010 A).

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, Gull Lake United Methodist Church, Richalnd, Michigan (2010 W).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2011 A).

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., New Orleans, Louisiana (2009 T).  *Chairman of the Audit Committee.

Anne H. Hunter, president, Marketing Source USA, Inc., Edina, Minnesota (2009 A). *Vice chairman for enrollment and community relations.

David K. Johnson, physician, Lansing Institute of Urology, Lansing, Michigan (2011 A).

Jonathan D. Keaton, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Southfield, Michigan.

Carol A. Leisenring, co-director, Financial Institutions Center, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2009 T). *Chairman of the Investment Committee.

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2011 T). *Vice chairman for business and finance.

Robert D. Musser III, president, The Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2010 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman, Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., Washington, DC (2010 T).

JoEllen Parker, executive director, National Institute for Technology and Liberal Education, Ann Arbor, Michigan (2010 D).

Jeffrey C. Petherick, founder/partner, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2011 T).

Donna M. Randall, president, Albion College (ex-officio).

Charles G. Raphael, vice president, retail banking group (retired), Bank One Corp., Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2009 A).

William A. Ritter, senior minister (retired), Birmingham First United Methodist Church, Birmingham, Michigan (2010 D).

Stephen Sanney, recent graduate, (2010 R).

William Schuette, judge, Michigan Court of Appeals, Lansing, Michigan (2010 T).

Joseph O. Serra, president, Serra Automotive, Grand Blanc, Michigan (2009 T).

Thomas C. Shearer, J.D., president, Thomas C. Shearer, P.C., Grand Rapids, Michigan (2009 W).

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2009 T).

Richard M. Smith, chairman, Newsweek, New York, New York. (2011 T). *Vice chairman for academic and student affairs.

William K. Stoffer, chief executive officer, Albion Machine and Tool Company, Albion, Michigan (2011 T). *Vice chairman for institutional advancement.

Coletta N. Thomas, Ph.D. candidate, women�s issues counselor, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2011 T). *Chairman.

John N. Vournakis, vice president for research and development, Marine Polymer Technologies, Danvers, Massachusetts (2011 T).

James M. Wilson, head, Gene Therapy Program, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2011 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T--elected by the Board of Trustees; A--
elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D--elected by the Detroit
Conference of the United Methodist Church; W--elected by the West Michigan
Conference of the United Methodist Church. R--recent graduate trustee

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, White Plains, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer, Tecumseh Products Company, Tecumseh, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board,
Norwalk, Connecticut.

Stanley Jones, vice president (retired), Unisys Corporation, Detroit, Michigan.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Iron Mountain,
Michigan.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, Michigan.

John S. Ludington, chairman emeritus, Dow Corning Corporation, Midland,
Michigan.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

John W. Porter, education consultant (retired), Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Lansing, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Faculty

Anne Mills McCauley, chair and professor.
B.F.A., 1976, Eastern Michigan University; M.F.A., 1978, Michigan State University. Appointed 1994.

Lynne Chytilo, professor.
B.F.A., 1978, University of Massachusetts Amherst; M.A., 1980, Purdue University; M.F.A., 1984, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Appointed 1984.

Michael Dixon, associate professor.
B.F.A., 1999, Arizona State University; M.F.A., 2005, University of Colorado at Boulder. Appointed 2008.

Ashley Feagin, assistant professor.
B.A., 2009, McNeese State University; M.F.A., 2012, Louisiana Tech University. Appointed 2013.

Bille Wickre, professor.
B.S., 1977, Dakota State University; M.A., 1984, University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1993, University of Michigan. Appointed 1992.

Faculty

Anne M. McCauley, chair and professor.
B.F.A., 1976, Eastern Michigan University; M.F.A., 1978, Michigan State University. Appointed 1994.

Lynne Chytilo, professor.
B.F.A., 1978, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; M.A., 1980, Purdue University; M.F.A., 1984, University of Wisconsin. Appointed 1984.

Michael Dixon, assistant professor.
B.F.A., 1999, Arizona State University; M.F.A., 2005, University of Colorado at Boulder. Appointed 2008.

Gary Wahl, associate professor.
B.A., 1993, University of Minnesota, Morris; M.A., 1997, M.F.A., 1998, University of Iowa. Appointed 2004.

Bille Wickre, professor.
B.S., 1977, Dakota State University; M.A., 1984, University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1993, University of Michigan. Appointed 1992.

Faculty

Anne M. McCauley, chair and professor.
B.F.A., 1976, Eastern Michigan University; M.F.A., 1978, Michigan State University. Appointed 1994.

Lynne Chytilo, professor.
B.F.A., 1978, University of Massachusetts Amherst; M.A., 1980, Purdue University; M.F.A., 1984, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Appointed 1984.

Michael Dixon, assistant professor.
B.F.A., 1999, Arizona State University; M.F.A., 2005, University of Colorado at Boulder. Appointed 2008.

Gary Wahl, associate professor.
B.A., 1993, University of Minnesota, Morris; M.A., 1997, M.F.A., 1998, University of Iowa. Appointed 2004.

Bille Wickre, professor.
B.S., 1977, Dakota State University; M.A., 1984, University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1993, University of Michigan. Appointed 1992.

Faculty

Anne M. McCauley, chair and professor.
B.F.A., 1976, Eastern Michigan University; M.F.A., 1978, Michigan State University. Appointed 1994.

Anne H. Barber, adjunct assistant professor.
B.A., 1994, University of Minnesota, Morris; M.F.A., 2004, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Appointed 2005.

Lynne Chytilo, professor.
B.F.A., 1978, University of Massachusetts Amherst; M.A., 1980, Purdue University; M.F.A., 1984, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Appointed 1984.

Michael Dixon, assistant professor.
B.F.A., 1999, Arizona State University; M.F.A., 2005, University of Colorado at Boulder. Appointed 2008.

Gary Wahl, associate professor.
B.A., 1993, University of Minnesota, Morris; M.A., 1997, M.F.A., 1998, University of Iowa. Appointed 2004.

Bille Wickre, professor.
B.S., 1977, Dakota State University; M.A., 1984, University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1993, University of Michigan. Appointed 1992.

Faculty

Anne M. McCauley, chair and professor.
B.F.A., 1976, Eastern Michigan University; M.F.A., 1978, Michigan State University. Appointed 1994.

Lynne Chytilo, professor.
B.F.A., 1978, University of Massachusetts Amherst; M.A., 1980, Purdue University; M.F.A., 1984, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Appointed 1984.

Michael Dixon, assistant professor.
B.F.A., 1999, Arizona State University; M.F.A., 2005, University of Colorado at Boulder. Appointed 2008.

Ashley Feagin, visiting assistant professor.
B.A., 2009, McNeese State University; M.F.A., 2012. Appointed 2013.

Bille Wickre, professor.
B.S., 1977, Dakota State University; M.A., 1984, University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1993, University of Michigan. Appointed 1992.

Faculty

Anne Mills McCauley, chair and professor.
B.F.A., 1976, Eastern Michigan University; M.F.A., 1978, Michigan State University. Appointed 1994.

Lynne Chytilo, professor.
B.F.A., 1978, University of Massachusetts Amherst; M.A., 1980, Purdue University; M.F.A., 1984, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Appointed 1984.

Michael Dixon, assistant professor.
B.F.A., 1999, Arizona State University; M.F.A., 2005, University of Colorado at Boulder. Appointed 2008.

Ashley Feagin, visiting assistant professor.
B.A., 2009, McNeese State University; M.F.A., 2012, Louisiana Tech University. Appointed 2013.

Bille Wickre, professor.
B.S., 1977, Dakota State University; M.A., 1984, University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1993, University of Michigan. Appointed 1992.

Interdisciplinary Courses

Interdisciplinary courses are offered to bridge the gaps which sometimes exist between differing, but related, academic areas. Each semester a variety of interdisciplinary courses are included in the curriculum. Students in these courses are exposed to a broad range of ideas and concepts which have been integrated to make them intellectually exciting. These courses may be team-taught by two or more faculty members or be problem-oriented courses which, by their nature, do not fit into existing departmental offerings.

ENVN 102 Introduction to the Environment (1)
Explores the interconnected web of earth's natural systems including the atmosphere, biological communities, oceans and continents, as well as humankind's interactions with and dependence on them. Major topics include global climate and problems of global warming and desertification; resources and problems of world hunger and population growth; and pollution and problems of ecosystem destruction. Staff.

ENVN 201 Ecology and Environmental Field Trip (1/2)
Prerequisites: Membership in the Institute for the Study of the Environment and permission of the instructor.
Demonstrates, in seminars and a one-two week field trip to a selected region of the United States, how ecosystems have been shaped by the interplay of biological, geological and human history and are thus both adapted to, and susceptible to changes in, modern landscape, climate and human practices. Examines environmental issues of both local and national significance related to these ecosystems. Staff.

ENVN 206 Sustainable Living Seminar (1/2)
Residents of the College's E-house and other students explore, through practice, the relationship between their daily actions and the earth's ecosystems. Several models of sustainability are discussed, and students are asked to articulate the view they believe appropriate for their own lives. Students cooperatively develop a significant improvement in the house or its grounds and monitor the environmental footprint of their actions. Staff.

ENVN 220 Economics, Ethics, and Environmental Policy (1)
Examines decisions affecting environmental quality made by individuals, businesses and other organizations, the moral foundations upon which group objectives are based and how policies are designed to incorporate moral considerations. Focuses on current national and local environmental policies and environmental ethics, with comparisons to practices in other cultures and eras. Hakes.

HCI 101 Introduction to Health Care (1/4)
Prerequisites: Completion and submission of application materials. (See Pre-health Advisor for the application form.)
Examines myriad health care careers and the education, rewards and challenges associated with each one. Emphasizes the team approach to health care, focusing on interactions among individuals with various specializations. Staff.

HUSV 101 Introduction to Human Services (1)
Acquaints the beginning student with the human services field, including the philosophy, values, directions and broad scope of the human services, and a clarification of the student's motivation and values in relation to a career in a helping field. An interdisciplinary course designed specifically for the human services concentration. Keyes, Staff.

IDY 100 Academic Success (1)
Utilizes lecture, discussion, readings and experience-based learning to provide students with an intellectual and practical understanding of psychological theories and concepts related to academic success. Focuses on constructs related to motivation, effort, personal insight, metacognition, self-regulation, the process of change and emotional intelligence. Staff.

IDY 198 Holocaust Studies (1/2)
Reviews the history of genocide, the history of the Jewish communities in Poland and the history of the Nazi extermination of Jews in Poland during the Second World War. Required for, and restricted to, students selected to participate in the spring Holocaust Studies Service-Learning Project in Poland. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

LWJS 101 Introduction to Law, Justice, and Society (1)
Explores the basic issues of law's relationship to contemporary society. Topics include the nature as well as historical and social functions of law; the culture and role of major legal actors in the legal system (e.g., lawyers, judges, juries, police, technology); the tension between ideals and realities in law; and the role of law in addressing contemporary social problems. Fosters analytical and critical skills. Serves as the gateway class to the concentration in law, justice, and society; however, registration is open to all interested students. W. Rose.

NEUR 241 Neuroscience I: Brain Structure and Function (1)
Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or permission of instructor.
An introduction to brain structure and function. Emphasis on the way the nervous system is organized to process information, construct representation of the world and generate adaptive behavior. Lecture, discussion, dissection. Neuroscience I is required for the neuroscience concentration. Same as Psychology 241. Jechura, Keyes, Schmitter, Wilson.

NEUR 242 Neuroscience II: Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (1)
Prerequisites: Neuroscience 241 and Biology 195, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to neuroscience with emphasis at the cellular and molecular levels. Covers structure and function of neurons and glial cells, electrical and chemical synapses, neurotransmitters, aspects of vision, axon guidance and outgrowth, energy metabolism in the brain, and the hormones and brain regions that affect eating activity and behavior. Schmitter.

PALN 209 Dinosaurs (1)
An interdisciplinary examination of the paleontology and biology of dinosaurs and their role in the history of science, popular culture and religion. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, documentaries and popular films are included. Bartels.

PBSV 101 Introduction to Public Service (1)
Prerequisite: Membership in the Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service.
Introduces new Ford Institute students to public policy and public service issues. Examines a broad range of themes including ethics, civic engagement, the history of public service in the United States and contemporary public policy concerns. Staff.

PBSV 397 Senior Colloquium (1/2)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Analysis of selected public policy issues. Colloquium includes discussion of the economics, politics, social and ethical factors that go into the making of public policy. Staff.

SCI 205 Women and Ethnic Minorities in Science (1)
Prerequisite: One 100-level science course.
An examination of both the history of women and other traditionally excluded persons in science, and the way science has looked at them. The course considers such questions as: Why are there so few members of these groups in science? What contributions have these scientists made? Would science be different if more members of these groups were scientists? Staff.

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