Career Planning

Sample Questions You Might Ask an Interviewer

Asking questions of your interviewer is the simplest way of showing knowledge about the position and an interest in the company. Don't interrupt with questions but be prepared when given the opportunity.

Sample questions you might ask a potential employer

  • What is a typical day like?
  • What personal qualities/characteristics are most important for success in this position/organization?
  • What working relationships will I have with others in the organization?
  • How often will my performance be evaluated? How will I be evaluated?
  • What are the prospects for future growth and expansion of this company?
  • What are the major changes that this organization wishes to bring about?
  • What training opportunities are available to better prepare employees for their position or for advancement?
  • What is the company's management philosophy?
  • Has this organization hired Albion graduates in the past? If so, what is their success record?
  • What will be expected of me as a new employee?
  • What has been your career path with this company?

If interviewing for a teaching position

  • What is the average class size?
  • What auxiliary services are offered to the student? To the teacher?
  • Describe the economic/cultural mix of students in your district.
  • Does the community support the school district? How?
  • What type of support does the administration provide for teachers?

Government

America Job - a federal and state government job search

Foreign Service Officer at the U.S. Department of State - Requirements and openings

GovernmentJobs - job opportunities in the public sector

Partnership for Public Service - non-profit, nonpartisan organization providing information on internship and job opportunities in the federal government

United Nations - Information on the on-line recruiting system for positions in the United Nations

USA.gov - the federal site for federal, state, and local government jobs

USAJobs - Federal government opportunities for employment across the world

Student Jobs - internships, training opportunities, and positions for students

Chicago Center: Chicago, Ill.

Subjects: Founded in 1970, Chicago Center extends the classroom walls for students from all majors by providing professional internships and experience-based seminars. Internships are available in all fields and are tailored to each student’s professional goals and academic requirements. Chicago Center seminars are unique learning experiences that take place in the heart of Chicago’s neighborhoods, highlighting the diversity of America’s third largest city. Students earn a full term worth of credit for the internship and seminar experience.

Chicago Center provides housing to all students and introduces them to city living during a two-week orientation. Student housing is located in Hyde Park, a beautiful lakefront community that is home to Chicago Center’s office and staff. Hyde Park is also home to the University of Chicago.

Prerequisities: 2.7 GPA, junior-level standing and demonstrated maturity.

Length: Fall semester, spring semester, or Summer.

Credit: 4.00 Albion units (16 semester hours). Two Albion College units for academic course work, two Albion College units for internship.
2.00 Albion Units for Summer program. (1 academic unit + 1 internship unit).
1.00 Albion Unit for Post Term

Housing: Chicago Center provides apartment style housing and a food budget to all students. All apartments are located in Hyde Park and are shared with other students in the program. Apartments are fully furnished and include Wi-Fi, laundry, and cable. Students are just blocks from the neighborhood shopping district and beautiful Lake Michigan.

Cost: Albion College tuition, room and board charges cover the Chicago Center program tuition, room, board, and program fees. The Chicago Center program fees include room, board, cultural events, texts, all in-city transportation and class fees. For summer and post-term students, the Albion College summer school tuition covers the tuition charges. The City Activity Expense fee is billed directly to the student, who then pays Chicago Center.

Costs Not Covered by Albion: $100 security deposit, City Activity Expense $300. For the summer: Program fee of $2,940 and City Activity Expense of $200. For the post-term: Program Fee of $1440 and City Activity Expense of $100.

Faculty Advisors:
Dr. Drew Christopher, 325B Olin,
Dr. Suellyn Henke, Olin 224,

Comments:Students intern full-time three days a week during the semester and four days a week during the summer. All students interview at multiple internship sites before making their decision and have access to Chicago Center’s extensive internship database. Class sizes are small (7-12) and allow for robust group discussions and personal feedback from instructors. The program is oriented toward understanding the diversity of experience in an urban setting, and allows students to engage with the city professionally and academically.

Contact:
Lane Chesebro
Director of Admissions and Student Affairs
Chicago Center
1515 E. 52nd Street, 2nd Floor
Chicago, IL 60615
Telephone: 773/363-1312
Fax: 773/363-5888
Toll-Free: 800/747-6059
Web: http://www.chicagocenter.org

Addressing Illegal Questions

Various federal, state, and local laws regulate the questions a prospective employer can ask you. Questions must relate to the job for which you are applying!

You have options if you are asked an illegal question

  • Choose to answer the question knowing you are providing information that isn't job related. You take the risk that a "wrong" answer could harm your chances for a position.
  • Refust to answer the question. You will be within your rights, but you may come off as uncooperative or confrontational which could put off potential employers.
  • Examine the intent behind the question and respond with an answer to this. For example, if you are asked if you are married or engaged, you might choose to respond that your personal life allows you to meet all the requirements for the position.

Questions that might be asked - illegally and legally

National Origin / Citizenship

Employers are allowed to ask if you are authorized to work in the US. They are not allowed to ask if you are a US citizen, were born in the US, or your native language.

Age

Employers are allowed to ask if you are over the age of 18. They are not allowed to ask how old you are, your birthdate, or the year your graduated from college if it isn't on your résumé.

Marital / Family Status

Employers need to know if you are able to perform the requirements of the job - including working overtime, relocating, or traveling if necessary. These questions should be asked directly. They are not allowed to ask about your marital status, children, or daycare arrangements so they can make assumptions if you are able to meet these requirements.

Affiliations

The social organizations or clubs you belong to are personal. The employer may aks if your membership in any organization might be relevant to your ability to perform the job.

Personal

Your height and weight is personal. The employer's right is restricted to knowing if you can fulfill the physical requirements of the position (e.g., lifting a 50-pound weight).

Disabilities

Employers are not allowed to ask if you are disabled or for your, or your family's, medical history. They may ask if you are able to perform the essential functions of the job and even request you demonstrate job-related functions. Once hired, companies are allowed to have you undergo a physical examination. Results are confidential with the exception that medical/safety personnel may be notified of conditions which could require medical treatment and supervisors regarding the needed accommodations.

For more information on when and how to disclose a disability, check out The National Organization on Disability and National Mental Health Center.

Arrest Record

Employers are not allowed to ask if you have been arrested but may ask if you been convicted of a crime that is resonably related to the performance of the job.

Military

Employers are not allowed to ask if you were honorably discharged from the military. They must limit their questions to the branch of service or training and education received during your time in the military.


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