Career Planning

Correspondence with Potential Employers

Although most of your job search letters will be written to seek out employment opportunities, there will be occasions that will require other forms of correspondence. These too should be prepared carefully and professionally.

Networking Letter

This letter is designed to generate informational interviews - not job interviews. During informational interviews you can meet with individuals who may be able to give you information about your intended career. Informational interviewing is a valuable way to research job markets, define career goals, and possibly uncover vacancy information.

A resume is not typically attached to a networking letter - again your goal with informational interviewing is not to interview for a job, but to gain information that may help you in your job search. However, during your informational interview, you may want to bring your resume in order to assist the interviewer in helping you answer questions or further clarify goals.

Thank You Letters

This is one of the most important, yet least used forms of correspondence. It is used to establish goodwill, express appreciation, and strengthen your candidacy. Make sure that everyone who helps you in your job search receives a thank you letter. When used to follow up a job interview, try to send your thank you letter (or email) within 24 hours.

This letter should be brief and concise. Make sure to restate your interest in the position, reemphasizing your qualifications and expressing your sincere appreciation for the interview.

Acceptance Letter

This letter is used to accept a job and confirm the terms of your employment (salary, starting date, etc.). Most often this letter follows a telephone conversation during which details of the offer and terms of employment are discussed. Some employers will specifically request that you respond in writing. Even when this is not the case, write a formal letter of acceptance to project your professionalism and avoid any confusion about your employment.

Withdrawal Letter

Once you accept a position, you have the obligation to inform all other employers of your decision, and to withdraw your application from consideration. Express appreciation for the employer's consideration and state simply and cordially that you have accepted other employment.

Letter of Decline

Employers aren't the only ones who send rejection letters. You may decide to decline job offers that don't fit your personal objectives and interests. Rejecting an offer should be done tactfully and thoughtfully. Indicate that you have given the offer careful consideration and have decided not to accept it. Be sure to thank the employer for the offer and for considering you as a candidate.

Career and Internship Center

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The Career & Internship Center is excited to introduce Handshake, the system that will help students and recruiters come together to meet, talk, and share opportunities. Start searching for jobs

From who you are to who you’ll become.

Welcome to the Career and Internship Center at Albion College—we are committed to assisting students and alumni as you plan for and move into your future. Our staff is dedicated to helping you through the maze of information available, no matter which career path you choose. As a key component of the Albion Advantage, we work closely with faculty mentors and the College's institutes and centers to help you prepare for your next step.

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Alumni Mentoring

Mentoring and Success at Albion College

Who is an Albion Mentor?

Albion Mentors are Albion alumni, friends, and parents who have successfully navigated college and careers. They enjoy the personal satisfaction of contributing to a student’s growth and the challenge of relating to today’s Albion students. Mentors play a variety of roles, from offering basic advice about a job search to sharing critical insights on career readiness. Combined with assistance from the Career and Internship Center, mentoring can create a powerful environment for student success.

Mentor/Student Relationships: Expectations and Guidelines

Overview

The Albion College mentoring program uses the strengths of the Linkedin network, Albion alumni, and supporters. The Albion Mentoring Linkedin group is a subgroup of the Albion College Official Linkedin group. You will need to be granted permission to be a part of the Mentoring group and will be expected to adhere to strong ethical standards to participate.

Mentoring Topics

Topics that may be covered within a mentoring relationship may be as simple as questions about how to communicate a skill in a resume. Students and mentors may form longer term mentoring relationships that cover choice of career, success in college, and success after college.

Getting Matched with a Mentor

The matching process will materialize in one of a few ways: the public arena of the Linkedin group or through a student reaching out to a specific mentor that is a member of the group. Public postings allow the Career and Internship Center, Alumni, and Parent Leadership offices to monitor and facilitate matches.

Steps for Connecting with a Mentor

  1. Make sure your Linkedin profile is up to date and professional.
  2. Join the Albion College Official Group on Linkedin.
  3. Request to join the Albion College Mentoring Group within the Albion College Official Group (located by clicking on the More tab and then Subgroups).
  4. Post questions or topics where you would like assistance to the group. This could be a request to be contacted by a mentor or a question for the group. Your posts may look something like the following examples:
    1. “I am a junior majoring in Communication Studies with a minor in Art. I would like to connect with someone with a similar background to help me explore career options.”
    2. “I am a sophomore majoring in Philosophy and I have not yet chosen a minor. I would like to ask the group their thoughts on this topic.”
    3. “I am looking for a mentoring relationship as I prepare for my junior year with aspirations of going to law school.”
    4. “I live in the Detroit area, and I would like to work in marketing after I graduate. Is there someone in the group that I could meet with while I am home during Thanksgiving Break?”
  5. Make sure that you always follow-up with mentor communications.
  6. When appropriate, foster a longer-term relationship by providing updates once per semester to mentors.

Mentors are not official representatives of Albion College. Make sure to exercise care and be an educated consumer of information.

Terminating the Mentor/Mentee Relationship

There is no formal process to terminate the mentoring relationship. At any time, either the mentor or the student can indicate that contact is no longer necessary. Both the mentor and the student is expected to respect the wishes of the party requesting termination.

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