Spanish

Faculty

Kyle D. Shanton, chair and professor.
B.A., 1985, University of Iowa; M.A., 1990, Ph.D., 1998, University of Arizona. Appointed 2007.

Suellyn M. Henke, associate professor.
B.P., 1987, M.A.T., 1990, Ph.D., 2000, Miami University (Ohio). Appointed 2002.

Introduction

The Education Department is the academic unit housing the faculty and courses that support the mission of the Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development and the teacher education program (TEP). Information about the program of study and certification may be found in this section. Summary information on the Shurmur Center may be found in the Academics at Albion section.

The Ferguson Center for Technology-Aided Teaching and Learning hosts the Learning Café, a dynamic and flexible place for prospective teachers to use computer and Web-based technologies for designing lesson and unit plans, viewing and archiving videotaped examples of teaching and learning, and creating electronic and online portfolios of TEP achievements. There is a lending library of equipment (e.g., digital cameras, video cameras, digital audio recorders, individual response systems) and curriculum materials to support students in their field experiences. The Ferguson Center is a member of the Michigan Association of Computer Users in Learning (MACUL), the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) and the Consortium for Outstanding Achievement in Teaching with Technology (COATT). Albion College education students are eligible to apply for the COATT award, given to a pre-service and in-service teacher who creates a portfolio of his or her work in educational technology and teaching and learning.

Albion College’s teacher certification program offerings in elementary, secondary, and K-12 education are authorized by the Michigan Department of Education's Office of Professional Preparation Services.

In preparation for student teaching, students participate in field experiences integrated into course work in 200- and 300-level education classes. All TEP students are required to complete either Education 396: Boundary Crossings in Elementary Schools or Education 397: Boundary Crossings in Secondary Schools (also known as “Maymester”). These courses require an integrated field experience that begins during the spring semester and includes full-time participation during three weeks in a classroom in May as part of the junior or senior year. There is no additional tuition charged for the Maymester portion of the course; however, students will be charged for room and board during this period. Students are expected to complete a digital portfolio prior to completing their program of study.

Albion's teacher education program offerings are accredited by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council. We welcome students of all races, religions or national origins and are in full compliance with the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Changes in certification requirements as determined by the Michigan Department of Education and/or in requirements set by Albion College and the Education Department may necessitate changes in programs described in this catalog. When such changes are implemented, efforts will be made to provide as smooth a transition to the new requirements as possible.

Admission—Students may formally apply for admission to the teacher education program (TEP) after successfully completing Education 202. Requirements include: a 2.7 cumulative grade point average (GPA), a 3.0 GPA in the teaching major and teaching minor (or planned program), a 3.0 GPA in education classes, confirmation of having taken and passed all three sections (Reading, Mathematics, and Writing) of the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) Basic Skills Test, a successfully written essay, two letters of recommendation and documented previous work with children and youth in an educational setting. In accordance with State Board of Education policy, students are also required to complete three criminal history checks: in Education 202 prior to admission, in Education 203 as part of the application for admission, and again prior to student teaching. As part of this process, students are required to access the Internet Criminal History Access Tool (ICHAT) through the Michigan State Police website and submit the report to the Education Department. Students are responsible for the $10 ICHAT fee. Students must also complete an Albion College criminal history check form and a Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) consent to release form. A detailed explanation of requirements for admission may be obtained directly from the Education Department.

Students are also encouraged to acquire additional educational experience through volunteer or ancillary work in tutoring, outdoor camps, and community and regional programs focused on children and youth such as Foreign Language in Elementary Schools (FLES) or Big Brothers/Big Sisters.

Further, students are required to maintain a 2.7 cumulative GPA, and a 3.0 GPA in their teaching major, teaching minor (or planned program), education concentration and in other course work required for the teacher education program. All required courses must be taken for a grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

Student Teaching—Students must sign up for student teaching no later than January of the preceding academic year. Student teaching is a capstone experience that brings many significant responsibilities and obligations, and involves time commitments during and after school as well as evenings. Therefore, student teachers must petition to receive advance permission from the Education Department to take other courses, work, hold leadership positions in organizations on- or off-campus, or participate in any activity that would potentially interfere with student teaching. All student teaching placements are made by the field placement coordinator. Placements are made within a 30-mile radius of Albion in order to accommodate supervision, seminar and capstone commitments.

Testing—Act 267 of the Public Acts of 1986 requires that all students seeking to enroll in student teaching in any Michigan teacher education program must take and pass the Basic Skills Test (Test Code 096) administered by Pearson Education, Inc. This test should be taken during the freshman year and no later than the sophomore year as part of the Albion College TEP admissions process. Cost, dates and site information are available online at http://www.mttc.nesinc.com .

All education students need to pass Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) subject area tests before they can be certified by the Michigan Department of Education (MDE). Elementary certification candidates must pass the Elementary Education Tests (Test Codes 103 and 104). If they wish to teach in their major in grades 6-8, they must also pass the subject area test in their teaching major. All secondary and K-12 certification candidates must pass the subject area tests in their teaching major and minor. K-12 music education students take only the Music Education Test (Test Code 099). Students seeking certification to teach French, German or Spanish are also required to pass the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages’ Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) exam at an “advanced low” level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and TEP adviser to prepare for this exam. It is generally recommended that students take content area exams once major course work in that area is completed, during the senior year prior to student teaching. As required by the MDE, we report a 100 percent passing rate for Albion College graduates whose applications were approved for certification during the last academic year on all state-required certification tests. During test registration, students must request that their MTTC scores be officially reported to Albion College (Institution Code 02).

Certification Fee—Michigan Act No. 339 requires that all teacher candidates pay a fee of $160 for the issuance of a certificate. Albion College is not involved in the collection of the fee. Candidates are billed online by the MDE. Albion College can only approve a candidate’s application for certification. The MDE does not certify until the candidate pays the certification fee.

Provisional Certification—The initial teacher’s certificate issued by the State of Michigan to qualified graduates of approved teacher education institutions is a provisional certificate which is valid for up to six years. Program completers apply to the MDE for certification via the Michigan Online Educator Certification System (MOECS); the certification officer verifies all requirements are met and approves the applicant as eligible for certification. The program completer pays a $160 fee to the MDE, and her/his certificate is then available to print online at MOECS (notarization required).

Education Department Website

Certifications

Elementary Certification

Albion offers programs leading to Michigan certification at the elementary level (grades K-8) in the following subject areas:

English/Language Arts
Integrated Science

Mathematics
Social Studies

Students accepted as candidates for elementary certification must:

  • Complete a planned program as specified below.
  • Complete all other requirements as specified by Albion’s Education Department.

Elementary Certification Program

Prerequisite courses for all certifications: Engl 101; Psyc 101; Science with a lab: Biol 195, Chem 107, Geol 101 or 103, Phys 105, or Biol 236 (summer only)

English/Language Arts Integrated Science Mathematics Social Studies
Educ 319
Engl 348
Hist 131
IDY 262
Math 104
Psyc 251
Sci 285
Educ 319
Engl 203*
Engl 348
Hist 131
IDY 262
Math 104
Psyc 251
Educ 319
Engl 203*
Engl 348
Hist 131
IDY 262
Psyc 251
Sci 285
Educ 319
Engl 203*
Engl 348
IDY 262
Math 104
Psyc 251
Sci 285
Professional sequence for all certifications: Educ 202 (1), Educ 203 (1), Educ 247 (1/2), Educ 259 (1), Educ 371 (1), Educ 372 (1/2), Educ 396 (1)**, Educ 421 (3), Educ 431 (1)

* Either English 101H or English 203 satisfies the planned program requirement.
** Course meets intermittently during the spring semester and intensively during three weeks in May, requires residence on campus, and is part of spring registration.

Course descriptions and prerequisites are listed under the respective departments. Numbers in parentheses indicate units of credit awarded. Students apply for formal acceptance and admission into the TEP during their sophomore year while enrolled in Education 203. If a student desires to do off-campus study, the ideal semester to do so is the fall of the junior year.

Interdisciplinary Major in Integrated Science—The integrated science major is primarily intended for students seeking a broad, cross-disciplinary understanding of the natural sciences. Students completing a major in integrated science are required to take courses in all the natural sciences and also to choose a minor in biology, chemistry, geology or physics. Minors are not endorsed. The detailed requirements for the major are available from an Education Department adviser.

Interdisciplinary Major in Social Studies (Elementary)—The social studies major is primarily intended for students seeking a broad, cross-disciplinary understanding of the social sciences. Students completing a major in social studies are required to take courses in anthropology and sociology, economics and management, geological sciences, history and political science. No minor is required. The detailed requirements for the major are available from an Education Department adviser.

Secondary/K-12 Certification

Albion offers programs leading to Michigan certification at the secondary level (grades 6-12) in the subject areas listed below and K-12 certification in French, German, Spanish and music.

The following are options for secondary teaching majors and minors:

Biology
Chemistry
Earth Science/Geology
English
French
German
History

Mathematics
Music
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Social Studies (major only)
Spanish

Students accepted for secondary and/or K-12 certification must:

  • Complete a teaching major of at least eight units;
  • Complete a teaching minor of at least five units;
  • Complete a sequence of pedagogy courses, including Education 338/9 or 348/9 or 358/9, 373 and 397;
  • Complete all other requirements as specified by the Education Department.

Pedagogy course(s) note: Students with a humanities (English, French, German, Spanish) major and minor take Education 339; students with a social science (history, political science, psychology) major and minor take Education 349; and, students with a mathematics/natural science (biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, mathematics) major and minor take Education 359. Otherwise, students with major and minors split between humanities, social science, and/or mathematics/natural science take the appropriate combination of Education 338, 348 and 358 for one unit total. Music students take pedagogy courses in the Music Department. Students should consult with their Education Department adviser to ensure they are taking the correct pedagogy courses.

Secondary/K-12 Certification Program
Year Fall Spring Summer
First Year Psyc 101* (1)
Sophomore Educ 202* (1)
Psyc 251* (1)
Educ 203* (1)
Junior Educ 338/9, 348/9*****,
358/9** (1)
Educ 396***
or Educ 397*** (1)
Senior Educ 371**** (1)
Educ 373* (1)
Educ 422 or 423* (3)
Educ 432* (1)

* May be taken either fall or spring semester.
** Discuss appropriate course(s) with Education Department adviser. Music students take pedagogy course work offered through the Music Department.
*** Education 396 required for K-12 certification; Education 397 required for secondary certification. Course meets intermittently during the spring semester and intensively during three weeks in May, requires residence on campus, and is part of spring registration.
**** K-12 certification requires Education 371 in addition to Education 373 for French, German and Spanish majors. Course offered fall semester only.
*****History and political science major and minor require Education 349.

Course descriptions and prerequisites are listed under the respective departments. Numbers in parentheses indicate units of credit awarded. Students apply for formal acceptance and admission into the teacher education program during their sophomore year, after completing Education 202. If a student desires to do off-campus study, the ideal semester to do so is the fall of the junior year.

Interdisciplinary Major in Social Studies (Secondary)—The social studies major is primarily intended for students seeking a broad, cross-disciplinary understanding of the social sciences. Students completing a major in social studies are required to take courses in anthropology and sociology, economics and management, geological sciences, history and political science. No minor is required. The detailed requirements for the major are available from an Education Department adviser.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Minor in Educational Studies

This interdisciplinary minor is designed for students who have a broadly defined interest in the field of education (e.g., youth development and learning; sociocultural theory applied to schooling, families and youth; youth subcultures; comparative education; fine and dramatic arts pedagogies; public education policy; environmental education; pediatric health; recreation and athletics; museum or community-based education). The minor in educational studies can benefit students who are interested in making unique connections to their major area of study as well as students who are interested in exploring careers in education. Many graduate programs and career paths such as museum studies, public policy, counseling and sociology recognize the value of academic preparation in the field of education.

Students who participate in the educational studies minor are not required to be admitted into the Shurmur Center for Teacher Development/Teacher Education Program. The minor in educational studies is a generalized study of the field of education and does not lead to teacher certification. Students who complete teacher certification at Albion College are not eligible for the minor in educational studies.

  • A minimum of five units of course work including one unit in foundations of education (Education 202), one unit in human development and learning theories (Psychology 251, 253, or Educational Psychology), completion of an internship or practicum (Education 203, 382 or 398) and a minimum of two and one-half units of electives constituting a curricular focus. A current list of sample elective courses is available in the Education Department and is also maintained on the department website at www.albion.edu/education/.
  • Please note: Education 202 and 203 are accompanied by a field experience in the public schools and requires completion of (1) Albion College criminal history check form, (2) Internet Criminal History Access Tool search, and (3) Albion College educational/judicial records check.
  • Students must receive prior written consent from the Education Department to apply a directed study or course that is not from the recommended list toward completion of the educational studies minor. Requests should be sent directly to the chair of the Education Department.

Requirements for Minor in Teaching English as a Second Language

The minor in teaching English as a second language (TESL) provides students with a framework for conceptualizing language learning as well as the knowledge and skills to teach English as a second language in various settings. The TESL minor provides opportunities for making global connections to students’ major areas of study and develops skills and competencies for working in diverse ethnolinguistic communities in the U.S. or abroad.

This interdisciplinary TESL minor is designed as an option for all Albion College students, whether enrolled in the teacher education program (TEP) with an elementary, secondary or K-12 concentration or not. Students who are interested in declaring a TESL minor must schedule an appointment with the chair of the Education Department to discuss their plan of study and options. Please note: Education 202, 371, 373, 382 and 398 are accompanied by a field experience placement in public schools, or other educational settings, and require completion of: (1) Albion College criminal history check, (2) Internet Criminal History Access Tool search, and (3) Albion College educational records check.

  • A minimum of 5.5 units of course work including: one unit in learning and learners (Education 202); one unit in cross-cultural comparisons and perspectives (see list of options below); one unit in English language (English 348); one unit in language and literacy pedagogy (Education 371 or 373); one unit in foreign/second language learning at the 102-level or higher* and successful completion of a minimum one-half unit internship (Education 382 or 398).
  • Students must receive prior written consent from the Education Department to apply a directed study—or other course not from the recommended list of options—as a substitute toward completion of the TESL minor. Requests should be sent directly to the chair of the Education Department and must have the signature and approval of the course instructor attached.

*May require a prerequisite. Students with demonstrated foreign/second language learning will complete the foreign/second language requirement beginning at the appropriate placement level as determined by the Modern Languages and Cultures Department. Students who demonstrate native or near-native fluency in a language other than English will meet the requirement by successfully completing the requirement in a new language (i.e., a native speaker of Japanese may complete course(s) in German).

Those students not seeking admission to the TEP would not be eligible to be endorsed with teaching ESL on initial teacher certification in Michigan; however, they would receive an Albion College certificate of completion of the TESL minor study program. This certificate can be reviewed by TESOL and recognized as meeting international TESL standards.

Students seeking admission to the TEP may also complete the requirements for the TESL minor as part of completing either the elementary, secondary or K-12 teacher certification.

Cross-Cultural Comparisons and Perspectives (1 unit)
Anthropology & Sociology 231: Understanding Media in a Globalized World (1)
Anthropology & Sociology 336: Social Psychology: Sociological Perspectives (1)
Communication Studies 303: Organizational Culture and Communication (1)
Communication Studies 313: Intercultural Communication (1)
International Studies 130: Introduction to International Studies (1)
International Studies 370: Building on International and Intercultural Experiences (1)
Philosophy 309: International Ethics and Global Development (1)
Political Science 103: Introduction to International Politics (1)
Political Science 336: International Relations (1)
Political Science 256: Human Rights (1)
Political Science 357: International Law and Politics (1)
Women's and Gender Studies 116: Introduction to Gender Studies (1)
Women's and Gender Studies 240: Sexualities, Histories and Culture (1)

Education Courses

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

202 Foundational Contexts of Education (1)
An overview of the historical, social, political, multicultural and philosophical foundations of education. Provides the larger conceptual perspectives necessary for studying teaching, learning and education, and critically examines the relationship among teachers, schools and society. Seminar and field practicum. Students are required to access the Internet Criminal History Access Tool (ICHAT) through the Michigan State Police website and submit the report to the Education Department. Students are responsible for the $10 ICHAT fee. Students must also complete an Albion College criminal history check form and a Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) consent to release form. Henke, Shanton.

203 Processes in Learning and Teaching (1)
Prerequisites: Education 202 and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7.
Introductory course for students interested in teacher education. Emphasizes understanding and application of four processes: (1) observation, (2) inquiry, (3) reflection/assessment and (4) connection/creativity. These processes are essential in understanding and supporting personal and professional growth and in understanding teaching and learning in diverse K-12 classrooms. These processes, along with issues of personal and professional growth, will be explored in greater depth in all subsequent education course work. Seminar and special education field practicum. Students are required to access the Internet Criminal History Access Tool (ICHAT) through the Michigan State Police website and submit the report to the Education Department. Students are responsible for the $10 ICHAT fee. Students must also complete an Albion College criminal history check form and a Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) consent to release form. Shanton, Staff.

240, 241 Brass Instruments (1/4 each)
Same as Music 240, 241. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

242, 243 Woodwind Instruments (1/4 each)
Same as Music 242, 243. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

244, 245 Stringed Instruments (1/4 each)
Same as Music 244, 245. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

246 Percussion Instruments (1/4 each)
Same as Music 246. Staff.

247 Teaching for Understanding in a Diverse World: Inquiry and Reflection in the Pedagogy of Elementary Social Studies (1/2)
Supports elementary education students in developing pedagogical knowledge and skills through the exploration of professional and theoretical literature, projects and field-based teaching experiences. Required professional sequence course for all elementary education candidates in social studies. Staff.

248 Children's Literature (1)
Literature for the elementary and middle school. Same as English 248. Staff.

259 Teaching for Understanding in a Diverse World: Inquiry and Reflection in the Pedagogy of Elementary Mathematics and Science (1)
Prerequisite: Education 202.
Supports elementary education students in developing subject-specific pedagogical content knowledge focusing on the intersection of the needs and interests of children, community and school resources, and curriculum standards and benchmarks. Inquiry-oriented and field-based. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

319 Health and Wellness in the Elementary Classroom (1/2)
Introduces elementary education students to a holistic approach for promoting healthy and active lifestyles for their students. Prospective teachers become familiar with designing and integrating movement, health and physical education content in K-8 classrooms. Includes a required field placement in a K-8 public school or other educational setting. Shanton.

322 Teaching of Instrumental Music in the Schools
Same as Music 322. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

325 Teaching of Music in the Elementary School (1)
Same as Music 325. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

328 Teaching of Choral Music in the Secondary School (1)
Same as Music 328. Staff.

338, 339 Teaching for Understanding in a Diverse World: Inquiry and Reflection in the Pedagogy of the Humanities (1/2, 1)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Supports secondary education students with majors/minors in English and world languages (French, German and Spanish) in developing subject-specific pedagogical content knowledge through the exploration of professional and theoretical literature, projects, and teaching experiences. Inquiry-oriented and field-based. Henke, Shanton.

345 Methods of Teaching of Modern Languages (1)
Same as Modern Languages 345. Guenin-Lelle.

348, 349 Teaching for Understanding in a Diverse World: Inquiry and Reflection in the Pedagogy of the Social Sciences (1/2, 1)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Supports secondary education students with majors/minors in history, political science, and psychology in developing subject-specific pedagogical content knowledge through the exploration of professional and theoretical literature, projects, and teaching experiences. Inquiry-oriented and field-based. Henke.

358, 359 Teaching for Understanding in a Diverse World: Inquiry and Reflection in the Pedagogy of the Sciences (1/2, 1)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Supports secondary education students with majors/minors in biology, chemistry, geological sciences, physics, and mathematics in developing subject-specific pedagogical content knowledge through the exploration of professional and theoretical literature, projects, and teaching experiences. Inquiry-oriented and field-based. Staff.

371 Literacy Pedagogy in the Elementary School (1)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Examines the relevant research base on literacy acquisition and a variety of pedagogical approaches based on competing theories about literacy. Looks at culturally responsive pedagogy with children from a variety of racial, economic, and ethnic backgrounds, and at the knowledge, skills, and attitudes involved with the program processes. Requires development, implementation, and assessment of lesson plans. Field experience includes observation and teaching in public school classrooms. This course is required for all K-12 French, German and Spanish majors. Shanton.

372 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas at the Elementary Level (1/2)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Examines theory and pedagogy in literacy in content areas in the elementary grades, integrating reading and writing instruction into subject matter from liberal arts disciplines across the curriculum to enhance lifelong literacy skills. Emphasizes development, teaching, and assessment of lesson plans, using children’s fiction and non-fiction literature. Field experience. Shanton, Staff.

373 Literacy Pedagogy in Secondary Schools (1)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Examines literacy pedagogy in the secondary content areas. Field experiences in public school classrooms provide opportunities to observe learners and to practice the skills, methods, and strategies for teaching content literacy. Should be taken the semester prior to student teaching. Henke, Staff.

374 Teaching Advanced Concepts in Biology (1/4)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Extends elementary education students’ knowledge of biology-related scientific phenomena. Students design instructional experiences to teach concepts to K-8 audiences, culminating in final project which includes a digital portfolio and public performance. Staff.

375 Teaching Advanced Concepts in Chemistry (1/4)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Extends elementary education students’ knowledge of chemistry-related scientific phenomena. Students design instructional experiences to teach concepts to K-8 audiences, culminating in final project which includes a digital portfolio and public performance. Staff.

376 Teaching Advanced Concepts in Geology (1/4)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Extends elementary education students’ knowledge of geology-related scientific phenomena. Students design instructional experiences to teach concepts to K-8 audiences, culminating in final project which includes a digital portfolio and public performance. Staff.

377 Teaching Advanced Concepts in Physics (1/4)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203 and permission of department.
Extends elementary education students’ knowledge of physics-related scientific phenomena. Students design instructional experiences to teach concepts to K-8 audiences, culminating in final project which includes a digital portfolio and public performance. Staff.

382 International Education Practicum (1/2)
Prerequisites: Acceptance to Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development; application and approval of instructor.
Students travel and study abroad, teach a lesson, and conduct an individual inquiry project in an education setting. Using comparative education and cultural studies frameworks, students gain new insights about education abroad and in the United States. This course is designed to enhance awareness of diversity, globalization, and cross-cultural competencies. Students are required to meet regularly with instructor before and after the practicum experience. Includes a course fee. Henke, Shanton.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

396 Boundary Crossings in Elementary Schools (1)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203.
Focuses on learning about and working in the Albion Public Schools with children/youth from different backgrounds. Combines curriculum and classroom management theory and practice, and emphasizes exploring and developing integrative and creative teaching skills before doing the student teaching semester. Note: This Maymester course/experience begins during the spring semester and extends for three and one-half weeks after the spring semester for all junior elementary teacher education students. Shanton, Staff.

397 Boundary Crossings in Secondary Schools (1)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203.
Focuses on learning about and working in the Albion Pubic Schools with youth from different backgrounds. Combines curriculum and classroom management theory and practice, and emphasizes exploring and developing integrative and creative teaching skills before doing the student teaching semester. Note: This Maymester course/experience begins during the spring semester and extends for three and one-half weeks after the spring semester for all junior secondary teacher education students. Henke.

398 Shurmur Mentorship-Practicum (1/2)
Prerequisites: Education 202, 203, junior standing with a minimum 2.7 cumulative GPA and permission of the Education Department.
Develops a deeper awareness of the complexities in education and policy issues. Pairs students with mentors who work with education policy issues. Includes interpretation and evaluation of current educational policy issues faced by administrators and legislators who work on behalf of children and youth. This course is optional, not a requirement for certification. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1) Staff.

421 Elementary Student Teaching (3)
Prerequisites: Advising and permission from department. All elementary education courses need to be completed before student teaching.
A full school day, semester-long internship at the elementary school level under the supervision of an experienced, well qualified teacher. Weekly seminars provide a continuing support system for student teachers by establishing an open forum for the sharing of readings, problems and experiences. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Students are required to access the Internet Criminal History Access Tool (ICHAT) through the Michigan State Police website and submit the report to the Education Department. Students are responsible for the $10 ICHAT fee (but can be reimbursed by the Shurmur Center). Students must also complete an Albion College criminal history check form and a Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) consent to release form. Staff.

422 Secondary Student Teaching (3)
Prerequisites: Advising and permission from department. All secondary education courses need to be completed before student teaching.
A full school day, semester-long internship at the secondary school level under the supervision of an experienced, well qualified teacher. Weekly seminars provide a continuing support system for student teachers by establishing an open forum for the sharing of readings, problems and experiences. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Students are required to access the Internet Criminal History Access Tool (ICHAT) through the Michigan State Police website and submit the report to the Education Department. Students are responsible for the $10 ICHAT fee (but can be reimbursed by the Shurmur Center). Students must also complete an Albion College criminal history check form and a Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) consent to release form. Staff.

423 Student Teaching, Kindergarten through Grade 12 (K-12) (3)
Prerequisites: Advising and permission from department. All education courses need to be completed for student teaching.
A full school day, semester-long internship is divided equally between the elementary and secondary levels and done under the supervision of experienced, well qualified teachers. Weekly seminars provide a continuing support system for student teachers by establishing a congenial forum of peers and College supervisors for the sharing of readings, problems and experiences. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Students are required to access the Internet Criminal History Access Tool (ICHAT) through the Michigan State Police website and submit the report to the Education Department. Students are responsible for the $10 ICHAT fee (but can be reimbursed by the Shurmur Center). Students must also complete an Albion College criminal history check form and a Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) consent to release form. Staff.

431 Seminar: Elementary Student Teaching (1)
Prerequisite: Permission of department.
A capstone course reflecting on practice in the classroom. Focuses on professional development, portfolio design, technology integration and classroom management. Taken concurrently during student teaching semester. Shanton.

432 Seminar: Secondary Student Teaching (1)
Prerequisite: Permission of department.
A capstone course reflecting on practice in the classroom. Focuses on professional development, portfolio design, technology integration and classroom management. Taken concurrently during student teaching semester. Henke.

Faculty

Jon A. Hooks, chair and professor.
B.S., 1984, Cameron University; M.A., 1985, University of Texas, Dallas; M.A., 1987, Ph.D., 1989, Michigan State University; C.F.A., 2000. Appointed 1989.

Vicki L. Baker, associate professor.
B.A., 1999, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., 2001, Clarion University; M.S., Ph.D., 2007, Pennsylvania State University. Appointed 2007.

John B. Bedient, associate professor.
B.A., 1975, Alma College; M.B.A., 1978, Indiana University; C.P.A., 1977. Appointed 1985.

John M. Carlson, assistant professor.
B.S., 1979, Ball State University; C.P.A., 1982, C.M.A., 1984; M.B.A., 1999, Ph.D., 2012, University of Cincinnati. Appointed 2012.

Daniel H. Jaqua, assistant professor.
B.S., B.A., 2007, Rice University; Ph.D. candidate, 2015, University of Michigan. Appointed 2015.

Zhen Li, professor.
B.A., Peking University; M.A., 1999, Ph.D., 2004, Princeton University. Appointed 2004.

Gregory M. Saltzman, professor.
S.B., 1976, S.M., 1976, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A., 1978, Ph.D., 1982, University of Wisconsin. Appointed 1986.

Introduction

The Economics and Management Department provides students with an understanding of economic and management principles that will be useful throughout their careers. We address both the immediate application of problem-solving techniques and the conceptual basis for those techniques. The department offers an 8-unit major in economics and management, a 10-unit major in economics and management with emphasis (emphases in economics, general business, human resources, or international business and international economics), a 9.5-10 unit major in accounting (corporate track or C.P.A. track), a 10-unit major in finance, and four minors: accounting, finance, economics, and management. The department also supports the interdepartmental majors in mathematics/economics, business and organizations, public policy, and social studies.

Economics and Management Department Website

Career Opportunities

Graduates in economics and management have professional opportunities in many aspects of business, including accounting, banking, finance, international business, human resources, marketing and sales, and retailing. The program also provides a strong background for graduate study in law, business, economics, public policy studies and related areas. Albion offers all the courses needed to meet the 150-hour requirement for becoming a certified public accountant.

Special Features

The department spans the worlds of theory and practice. We teach students how to analyze problems faced by businesses, government, or nonprofit organizations; make decisions; and lead. The department maintains a close relationship with the business world, which aids in the placement of graduates.

Departmental Policy on Advanced Placement Credit

Students who earn a 5 on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam in microeconomics will receive one unit of credit for E&M 101. Students who earn a 4 will receive one unit of credit for E&M 191. E&M 191 will not meet the E&M 101 requirement for the E&M major but will count toward the 32 units for graduation.

Students who earn a 5 on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam in macroeconomics will receive one unit of credit for E&M 102. Students who earn a 4 will receive one unit of credit for E&M 192. E&M 192 will not meet the E&M 102 requirement for the E&M major but will count toward the 32 units for graduation.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Economics and Management Major (8 units)

  • A minimum of eight units in economics and management, including 101, 102, 211, 230, 232 and three additional units in economics and management (one must be at the 300-level). Unless approved by the department in advance, 230 and 232 must be taken at Albion College. The eight units used to fulfill major requirements must be taken for a numerical grade. It is recommended that all courses taken in the department by majors be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis. Normally, students will enroll in 101 in either the first or second semester and 102 in the semester after 101. E&M 211 is not open to first semester freshmen but is normally taken in either the second or third semester. E&M 230 and 232 should be taken in the second year along with the statistics cognate requirement. It is recommended that students planning a major in economics enroll in Mathematics 125 or calculus during their first year. Seniors may be required to participate in a senior assessment exercise…
  • The following cognate areas must be completed for a major:
    1. Mathematics 125 (or higher or demonstrated proficiency).
    2. One statistics course from Mathematics 209, 309, or E&M 235.
  • In addition, it is recommended that individuals interested in graduate study in business or management take Mathematics 141 and 143. Individuals contemplating graduate study in economics should complete the mathematics/economics major.
  • Because of the increased globalization of the U. S. economy, all majors are encouraged to participate in approved off-campus study programs. For a list of approved programs, consult with the Center for International Education.

Requirements for Economics and Management Major with Emphasis (10 units)

  • A minimum of 10 units in economics and management (nine for the emphasis in international business and international economics), including 101, 102, 211, 230, 232. Unless approved by the department in advance, 230 and 232 must be taken at Albion College.
  • The 9-10 units used to fulfill major with emphasis requirements must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • The following cognates must be completed for a major with emphasis: Mathematics 125 (or higher or demonstrated proficiency); one statistics course from Mathematics 209, 309 or E&M 235. The major with emphasis in international business and international economics requires, in addition to the preceding, completion of an off-campus study program or internship in a foreign country, plus one course from the following: a modern foreign language at the 201 level or higher, A&S 238, 248, 375; Communication Studies 313; History 103, 111, 142, 217, 218, 263, 264, 308, 309, 313, 382, 385, 390; International Studies 130, 264, 300; Modern Languages and Cultures 105; Philosophy 303, 309; Political Science 202, 305, 336, 338, 352; Religious Studies 102, 104, 204, 211, 212.
  • A focused selection of courses chosen from among the emphases listed below.

    Emphasis in economics
    Five units selected from the following: 273, 322, 323, 331, 354, 365, 366, 368, 375, 379, 380.

    Emphasis in general business
    212, 259, 336, 348, plus one unit selected from the following: 305, 350, 355, 357, 359, 362, 376.

    Emphasis in human resources
    259, 354, 355, Psychology 101, plus one unit selected from the following: 305, 353, 376, Psychology 346.

    Emphasis in international business and international economics
    Two units selected from 362, 363, 365, 366, plus one unit selected from the following: 212, 259, 331, 336, 348, 359, 368, 376.

  • A student may declare only one economics and management major with emphasis, even if the student completes the requirements for more than one emphasis.

Additional information on the Economics and Management major can be found in this pdfprogram flyer (PDF).

Requirements for Accounting Major (9.5-10 units)

Corporate Emphasis

  • A minimum of 9.5 or 10 units in accounting, economics, and management, including 101, 102, 211, 212, 230 or 232, 248, 311, 312, 343 or 385, plus one unit of elective in the department at the 200-level or higher.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Two units of cognates, including Mathematics 125 (or higher or demonstrated proficiency) and E&M 235 or Mathematics 209 or 309.

C.P.A. Emphasis

  • A minimum of 9.5 or 10 units in accounting, economics, and management, including 101, 102, 211, 212, 311, 312, 341, 342, 383, 384, 343 or 385.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Two units of cognates, including Mathematics 125 (or higher or demonstrated proficiency) and E&M 235 or Mathematics 209 or 309.

Requirements for Finance Major (10 units)

  • A minimum of 10 units in economics and management, including 101, 102, 211, 230, 232, 248, 311 or 312, 348, 368, plus one unit from the following: 331, 344, 365.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Two units of cognates, including Mathematics 125 (or higher or demonstrated proficiency) and E&M 235 or Mathematics 209 or 309.

Information on Minors

  • The minors in accounting, economics, finance, and management are not open to economics and management majors.
  • Students may not choose more than one minor in the Economics and Management Department.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

Requirements for Minor in Accounting-Corporate Track

  • Five units in economics and management, including: 211, 212 and either 311 or 312, plus two from 248, 311 or 312 (if not taken above), 341, 342, 348, 384 and (with approval of the E&M department chair) 389.
  • Two units of cognates: Math 125 or higher or proven proficiency and 235 or Math 209 or Math 309.

Requirements for Minor in Economics

  • Five units in economics and management, including: 101 and either 230 or 232, plus three from 102, 230, 232, 235, 273, 322, 323, 331, 344, 354, 363, 365, 366, 368, 375, 379, 380 and (with approval of the department chair) 389.

Requirements for Minor in Finance

  • Five units in economics and management, including 211, 248 or 348, 344, 368, plus one from 248, 348, 311, 331, 365, 379, 380, and (with approval of the E&M department chair) 389.
  • Two units of cognates: Math 125 or higher or proven proficiency and 235 or Math 209 or Math 309.

Requirements for Minor in Management

  • Five units in economics and management, including: 101, 211 and either 259 or 359, plus two additional units from 212, 259, 305, 311, 312, 336, 341, 342, 344, 348, 350, 353, 355, 357, 359, 362, 368, 376, and (with approval of the department chair) 389.

Economics and Management Courses in Interdepartmental Majors

Three interdepartmental majors require courses in economics. The mathematics/economics major, which requires six courses in economics, prepares students for actuarial science, operations research or graduate study in economics. The public policy major, which requires three courses in economics, focuses on government decision-making. The social studies major with elementary or secondary education certification, which requires two courses in economics, is aimed at students who seek to become K-12 teachers.

Economics and Management Courses

The following courses are offered without specific course prerequisites for interested liberal arts students: Principles of Microeconomics (101); The Economy and Financial Markets (102); Financial Accounting (211); Managing People and Organizations (259); Women in Business and Leadership (305); Issues in Modern Political Economy (322); Marketing Principles and Decision Making (336); Business Law (350); Labor Law, Unions, and Management (353); Human Resource Management (355); Management Consulting (358); Management (359); International Management (362); and Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (376).

101 Principles of Microeconomics (1)
Prerequisite: High school algebra.
Introduction to the principles of decision-making by households and businesses. Supply and demand; the impact of prices and costs on market behavior; and public policies related to taxation, the environment, the labor market, and international trade. Hooks, Jaqua, Li, Saltzman.

102 The Economy and Financial Markets (1)
Introduction to the macroeconomy and macroeconomic models with special emphasis on the role of financial markets, interest rates, the Federal Reserve, monetary and fiscal policy, and money and capital markets. Hooks, Li.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

211 Financial Accounting (1)
Introduction to the world of business and accounting. Emphasis on understanding the concepts of net income, cash flow and financial condition. Communication of economic results through financial statements and reports. Development of analytical skills used in evaluating business success. Not open to first-year students. Bedient, Carlson.

212 Managerial and Cost Accounting (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 211 or permission of instructor.
Development and use of accounting information for effective managerial control and decision-making within a complex organization. Topics include cost behavior, profit planning, cost accounting (including job order, process and activity-based), just-in-time inventory control, standard costs and budgetary control. Bedient, Carlson.

230 Intermediate Microeconomics (1)
Prerequisites: E&M 101, Mathematics 125 or equivalent.
Theoretical analysis of consumer choice theory and demand, production and cost, the firm and market organization, distribution and general equilibrium, game theory. Jaqua.

231 Intermediate Microeconomics with Calculus (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 101 and Math 141 or permission of instructor.
A more rigorous version of Economics 230 for students pursuing the mathematics/economics major and for others with the necessary math background by permission. Not offered every year. Jaqua.

232 Intermediate Macroeconomics (1)
Prerequisites: E&M 101, 102, Mathematics 125 or equivalent.
The development of macroeconomic theory and its application to government policy toward unemployment, inflation and growth. Hooks, Li.

235 Economic Statistics (1)
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125 or equivalent.
A first course in statistics with emphasis on regression analysis and its applications in economics and management. Not open to students who have taken Mathematics 209 or 309. Jaqua.

248 Financial Modeling with Excel (1)
Introduction to Excel and the application of Excel to finance. Includes use of Excel to model various financial concepts and apply these concepts to real world situations. Bedient, Hooks.

259 Managing People and Organizations (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
An introduction to organizational behavior, including analysis at the level of the individual group or team, and organization. Topics addressed included employee attitudes and job satisfaction, managerial decision making and problem solving, managing teams, conflict and negotiation, leadership, and organizational culture and design. For students in the Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management and for others by permission. Baker.

273 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 101.
Economic theory is used to examine environmental and natural resource problems and policies. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

305 Women in Business and Leadership (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
Historical and contemporary perspectives on the expanding role of women in leadership positions, both in business and in other realms, such as politics. Extensive classroom discussions and use of case studies. Issues addressed include equal pay, work-family balance, the “opt-out myth,” challenges women face in various industries or occupations, and the role of corporations in hindering or supporting women’s advancement. Baker.

311 Intermediate Accounting I (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 211.
Theory and practice underlying financial accounting measurement and reporting. Provides a detailed exploration of assets and their relationship to income determination. Includes coverage of generally accepted United States accounting principles (GAAP) and international financial reporting standards (IFRS). Bedient, Carlson.

312 Intermediate Accounting II (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 211.
Theory and practice underlying financial accounting measurement and reporting. Provides a detailed exploration of liabilities and stockholders’ equity, and other selected topics including pensions, leases and the statement of cash flows. Includes coverage of generally accepted United States accounting principles (GAAP) and international financial reporting standards (IFRS). Usually taken after E&M 311. Bedient, Carlson.

322 Issues in Modern Political Economy (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
A non-technical course on selected legal and public policy issues related to the economy. Topics vary from term to term but could include such issues as equal employment opportunity and affirmative action, the use of economic analysis in setting public policy, and government's role in health care. Not offered every year. Saltzman.

323 Government Economics and Policy (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 101.
Application of microeconomic analysis to expenditure and revenue decisions in the public sector, including rationale for government expenditures, criteria for revenue generation and the analysis of economic effects of major taxes. Not offered every year. Hooks.

331 Money and Banking (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 102.
Focuses on the Federal Reserve and its attempts to promote maximum sustainable economic growth. Other topics include the nature of money, the determination of interest rates, the financial system and financial institution operations, the structure of the Federal Reserve and the macroeconomics of inflation and growth. Hooks, Li.

336 Marketing Principles and Decision-Making (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.
Principles of modern marketing and techniques used to make marketing-based business decisions. Emphasis is placed on setting marketing goals and devising appropriate strategies and tactics to achieve the goals. Students put theories into practice with computer simulations and electronic spreadsheet models. Bedient.

341 Federal Income Taxation (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 311.
Comprehensive introduction to federal income taxation, particularly as it relates to individuals and businesses. Emphasis on the recognition of opportunities for effective tax planning and management. Carlson.

342 Auditing (1)
Prerequisites: E&M 311 or 312.
Introduction to auditing concepts, objectives and standards; topics include professional ethics, types of audits (their purpose, scope, and methodology). EDP auditing, and statistical sampling. Reference will be made to authoritative auditing standards and pronouncements. Bedient, Carlson.

343 Advanced Taxation and Corporate Transactions  (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 341. 
A continuation of E&M 341. Taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. Tax planning and management strategy aspects of corporate formation and reorganization. Students prepare and revise legal memoranda on tax issues. Students may not receive credit for both E&M 343 and E&M 385. Carlson.

344 Portfolio Theory (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 102.
An overview of the characteristics and analysis of individual security returns, and the theory and practice of optimally combining securities into portfolios. Examines the equilibrium pricing of securities in the context of the capital asset pricing model, and the risk/return relationship of both individual securities and portfolios, as well as the recent attack on the CAPM and the implications for efficient markets. Not offered every year. Hooks.

348 Financial Management (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 101.
A survey course covering principles of corporate financial management. Topics include working capital management, agency theory, capital budgeting, capital structure, divided policy, financial analysis and selected topics. Hooks.

350 Business Law (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
A case approach to the application of legal principles to business activity. Particular emphasis is placed upon the law of contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, business organization, and federal regulation of the competitive process. Junior or senior standing is recommended. Staff.

353 Labor Law, Unions and Management (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
Labor history, labor law, union-management relations, comparative labor movements. Student participation in a collective bargaining game. Not offered every year. Saltzman.

354 Labor Economics (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 101.
An investigation of labor market decisions and outcomes; topics include labor supply and demand, earnings, discrimination and unemployment. Not offered every year. Saltzman.

355 Human Resource Management (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
An overview of personnel management, with an emphasis on the needs of the general manager rather than the personnel specialist. Topics include employee motivation, job enrichment, labor relations, grievances and discipline, recruitment and selection, equal employment opportunity, performance appraisal, compensation and employee benefits. Baker, Saltzman.

357 Business Functions (1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Introduction to management, finance and marketing for students in the Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management. Bedient.

358 Management Consulting (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Prior courses related to management are recommended but not required. 
The role of management consultants in diagnosing organizational problems and developing action plans that can be effectively implemented. Students work on a team-based management consulting project for a community organization to gain “real world” experience and to develop interpersonal, communication and analytical skills. Teams address issues such as strategy, organizational structure, leadership development or process efficiency. Not offered every year. Baker.

359 Management (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to current management theory and practice. Traditional managerial functions such as planning, organizing and controlling are studied and contrasted with newer cross-functional approaches. The course emphasis is on the building blocks of management so that these principles can be applied to a variety of organizations including educational, business and not-for-profit institutions. Baker, Bedient.

362 International Management (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 
Cross-cultural, ethical and social issues related to doing business abroad. Corporate strategy and structure, communication, negotiation, human resources and marketing in multinational operations. Implications of foreign assignments for career development of managers. Not offered every year. Baker.

363 The Chinese Economy (1)
Prerequisites: E&M 101, 102.
An examination of economic policy and institutions in China since 1949. Topics include the Communist economic system adopted under Mao, the transition to a more market-oriented system beginning in 1978, sustainability of rapid economic growth, the banking and financial system, foreign trade and investment, labor market reforms, the social safety net, and rural economic development. Li.

365 International Finance (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 102.
International macroeconomics. Particular attention is paid to the relationship among exchange rates, balance of payments, international capital flows and macroeconomic equilibrium. Eurocurrency markets and alternative international monetary systems are also examined. Li.

366 International Trade (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 101.
International microeconomics. Study of models explaining trade patterns between countries. Analysis of industry-level trade policy issues including the effects of tariffs, quotas and other restrictions; international competition among large firms; technological change; and free trade areas. Li.

368 Financial Markets (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 102.
An examination of the way in which the market transfers resources from those with a surplus to those with a deficit. Students study both the theory of efficient transfer and the financial institutions and instruments which facilitate this transfer. Topics include the analysis of equity markets, fixed income markets and derivative markets. Hooks.

375 Health Economics (1)
Prerequisite: E&M 101 or permission of instructor.
A microeconomic and institutional analysis of health care services in the U.S., with particular reference to issues of cost and access. Topics include the demand for medical care, health insurance, economic regulation of hospitals, the markets for physicians and medical education, and the political economy of health care. Not offered every year. Saltzman.

376 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.
An introductory study of the theories and concepts related to negotiation and dispute resolution developed in such fields as microeconomics, psychology and industrial relations. Includes many role-playing exercises to provide students with practice in negotiation. Saltzman.

379 Econometrics (1)
Prerequisite: One of the following: Mathematics 209, Mathematics 309, or E&M 235.
An introduction to empirical work in economics and management. Topics covered include: hypothesis testing, estimation, correlation, and regression and related problems. Students use statistical software to access data sources and to write an empirical paper. Not offered every year. Jaqua.

380 Mathematical Economics (1)
Prerequisites: E&M 230 and at least one course in calculus.
Optimization and economic analysis, game theory and financial economics. Not offered every year. Jaqua.

383 Accounting Information Systems (1/2)
Prerequisite: E&M 311.
Provides a basic knowledge of the components of an accounting information system and the controls required to operate it efficiently. Students receive hands-on experience with a computerized accounting system. Bedient.

384 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting (1/2)
Prerequisite: E&M 211. E&M 311 recommended.
An introduction to accounting and financial reporting for governmental entities and non-profit organizations. Covers state and local governments, colleges and 165 universities, health care entities, museums, libraries and performing arts organizations. Bedient.

385 Advanced Taxation (1/2)
Prerequisite: E&M 341.
A continuation of E&M 341. Introduction to the taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Students may not receive credit for both E&M 343 and E&M 385. Carlson.

386 Accounting for Business Consolidations (1/2)
Prerequisite: E&M 312.
Theory and practice underlying the consolidation or disposition of multiple legal entities for accounting purposes. Covers the cost and equity methods of accounting for investments, combinations, and consolidations. Includes coverage of generally accepted United States accounting principles (GAAP), international financial accounting standards (IFRS), and Internal Revenue Service (IRS) federal income tax rules and regulations. Bedient, Carlson.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

389 Selected Topics (1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
The Economics and Management Department schedules a number of courses each semester under the flexible title "Selected Topics.'' These courses are offered to meet the evolving needs and interests of students. Examples of recent topics include: International Business and Marketing Engineering. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Limited to one unit of credit in economics and management. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar E or M (1/2, 1)
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing in economics and management and permission of the instructor.
Seminars are offered in selected areas not normally part of the regular curriculum. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing in economics and management and permission of instructor. Staff.

Programs of Study

Departmental Information

All of the departmental information contained in this section of the Academic Catalog was accurate as of July 1, 2012. Any departmental changes made after that date will not be reflected here. Information on changes may be obtained from the respective department or from the Registrar's Office in the Ferguson Student, Technology, and Administrative Services Building.

Course Numbering System

The following lists include all courses normally offered at Albion College. However, not all courses are offered every year. When possible, courses offered in alternate years are designated. For details, students should consult the Class Schedule for each semester, available online at: www.albion.edu/registrar. The College reserves the right to add or withdraw courses without prior announcement, as conditions may require.

Unless otherwise stated, 100 level courses are intended for freshmen, 200 level for sophomores, 300 and 400 level for juniors and seniors.

A list of courses which meet the core and category requirements, organized by departments, is available online at www.albion.edu/registrar.

Further information may be obtained at the Registrar's Office in the Ferguson Student, Technology, and Administrative Services Building.

Refund Policy During the Semester

If a student withdraws or is suspended or expelled from Albion College during a semester, then the student may be eligible for a refund of a portion of the tuition, fees, room and board paid to Albion College for that semester. If the student received financial assistance from outside of the family, then a portion of the refund will be returned to the grant, scholarship or loan source from which that assistance was received.

If a student plans to withdraw, then the student should complete the Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form, available from the Student Affairs Office, to begin the withdrawal process. This procedure will enable Albion College to refund the maximum possible institutional charges.

Two formulas exist for determining the amount of the credit: Albion's refund policy and a federal formula (Return of Title IV Aid) derived from the 1998 reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. The federal formula is applicable to any student receiving federal aid other than Federal Work-Study if that student withdraws on or before completing 60 percent of the semester. These students may also receive a refund of non-federal aid through Albion's refund policy. Students not receiving federal aid will have their refund calculated using only Albion's refund policy.

Albion's refund policy is as follows: Students who withdraw from Albion College may receive a pro-rated refund of tuition and board fees, according to the following schedule:

Week Institutional Refund Week Institutional Refund
1 75% tuition/pb* 7-14 Pro-rated board
2-6 40% tuition/pb* 15-16 No refund

*Pb=pro-rated board fees

The federal formula provides for a return of Title IV aid if the student received federal financial assistance in the form of a Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Perkins Loan, Federal Family Educational Loan Program or PLUS loan and withdrew on or before completing 60 percent of the semester. The percentage of the return is equal to the number of calendar days remaining in the semester divided by the total number of calendar days in the semester. Scheduled vacation periods of more than four days are excluded.

If any refund remains after the return of Title IV aid, the refund will be used to repay Albion College funds, state funds, other private sources and the student in proportion to the amount received from each non-federal source if there was no unpaid balance due at the time of withdrawal. If there was an unpaid balance, then all aid sources will be repaid before any money is paid to the student.

If funds were released to a student because of a credit balance on the student's account, then the student may be required to repay some of the federal grants or loans released to the student.

Students who have questions about the refund policy should contact the Financial Aid Office.

Appendix: Privacy Rights Policy

Albion College Policy on The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (The Act) of 1974 (as amended) is a federal law which states (a) that a written institutional policy must be established and (b) that a statement of adopted procedures covering the privacy rights of students be made available. The Act provides that the institution will maintain the confidentiality of student educational records and access to them by students.

FERPA Definition of Records

The Act defines education records as records, files, documents and other recorded materials which contain information directly related to a student and which are maintained by Albion College or a person acting for the College. The term education record does not include records of instructional, supervisory and administrative personnel and educational personnel ancillary thereto that are in the sole possession of the maker thereof and which are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a substitute; records on a student who is 18 years of age or older that are created or maintained by a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist or other recognized professional or paraprofessional acting in a professional or paraprofessional capacity, or assisting in that capacity and in connection with the provision of treatment to the student, and are not available to anyone other than persons providing such treatment, provided, however, that such records can be personally reviewed by a physician or other appropriate professional of the student's choice; records of students as employees unless the employment results from the employee's status as a student; and alumni records.

Access to Records

FERPA accords all the rights under the Act to all students at the College. This includes the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. Albion College will make disclosures without consent in these circumstances.

  • To school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or support staff position (including law enforcement unit and health and counseling staff); a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as a company providing services with respect to financial aid awards, student insurance, or other administrative support and research services, including those related to student testing and retention; an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee; or a person assisting a school official in performing his/her tasks (such as employment responsibility). A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his/her professional responsibility.
  • Upon request to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
  • To persons or organizations providing students financial aid.
  • To accrediting agencies carrying out their accrediting function.
  • To persons in an emergency in order to protect the health or safety of students or other persons.

Albion College will also release information to be in compliance with a judicial order; this release will occur only after an attempt has been made to contact the student at the current campus or last known permanent address.

Under certain circumstances information may be released to parent(s)/guardian(s). On an annual basis, students are expected to notify the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs whether or not, for tax purposes, students are dependents claimed on the income tax return of their parent(s)/guardian(s). The vice president for student affairs will facilitate this notification process. A representative of the College may communicate with parent(s)/guardian(s) relative to the following circumstances: discontinuance of enrollment; medical (including psychiatric) and/or psychological examinations required for the maintenance of enrollment as determined by the vice president for student affairs; alleged violation of a College regulation that will likely result in suspension or expulsion from the College if the student is found responsible; absence from the campus when there is reason to be concerned for the student's well-being because the student's whereabouts are unknown; mid-term grades; academic or disciplinary probation; needed medical or psychological attention, the nature of which might jeopardize a student's ability to maintain the status of enrolled. Parent(s) or guardian(s) in these cases will be defined as the individual the student has recorded as the parent(s) or guardian(s) on the admissions application or as emergency contacts. A student may change this designation at any time at the Registrar's Office.

A record of all disclosures will be maintained in the student record, except when the request is made by (1) the eligible student, (2) a school official who has been determined to have a legitimate educational interest, (3) a party with written consent from the eligible student, or (4) a party seeking directory information. The record of each disclosure will contain the name of the parties who have requested or received information and the legitimate interest the parties had in requesting or obtaining the information.

A listing of the types, locations and custodians of education records follows.

The rights of this policy are extended to all students enrolling in Albion College after January 1, 1975.

Directory Information

Directory information is the property of Albion College. At its discretion, the College may provide directory information in accordance with the provisions of the Act to include: name, permanent home city and state, name of parent(s)/guardians(s), local address, local telephone number, e-mail address, dates of enrollment, degrees earned, dates of degrees, class year, majors, minors, concentrations, adviser, awards/honors/scholarships, photographs, sports and activities, and height and weight of members of athletic teams. The College, including faculty, staff, and students, may not release directory information to any party on or off campus if the intent is to contact students for purposes such as (a) to increase an agency’s membership, financial gain, or event promotion, and (b) to promote an individual’s candidacy. It should be known that it is the College’s choice to release this information, and careful consideration is given to all requests to insure that the information is not released indiscriminately. A student may withhold directory information by notifying the Registrar’s Office in writing within two weeks after the first day of class for the term.

Requests for non-disclosure will be honored by the institution for only one academic year; therefore, authorization to withhold directory information must be filed annually in the Registrar’s Office.

Review Process

The Act provides students with the right to inspect and review information contained in their educational records, to challenge the contents of their educational records, to have a hearing if the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory, and to submit explanatory statements for inclusion in their files if they feel the decisions of the hearing panel to be unacceptable. The Registrar's Office and the Vice President for Student Affairs' Office have been designated by the institution to coordinate the inspection and review procedures for student educational records, which include admissions, personnel, academic and financial files, and placement records. Students wishing to review their education records must make written requests to the registrar or the vice president for student affairs, listing the item or items of interest. Records covered by the Act will be made available within 45 days of the request. All documents will be reviewed in the presence of a designated official. Any document a student may see he/she may have copies of, unless a financial hold exists, the document involves another person, or the student has waived his or her right to access. These copies would be made at the student's expense at 10 cents a page.

Restricted Information

As outlined by the Act, a student may not inspect and review the following: financial information submitted by parent(s)/guardian(s); letters of recommendation to which the student has waived the rights of inspection and review; or education records containing information about more than one student, in which case the institution will permit access only to that part of the record which pertains to the inquiring student. The institution is not required to permit a student to inspect and review confidential letters and recommendations placed in the files prior to January 1, 1975, provided the letters were collected under established policies of confidentiality and were used only for the purposes for which they were collected.

Challenge Procedures

A student who believes that an education record contains information that is inaccurate or misleading or otherwise in violation of his/her privacy or other rights may ask the College to amend a record. The student should write the College official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record he/she wants changed, and specify why the student believes it is inaccurate or misleading. The College official should consult with the vice president for student affairs or the registrar. If the decisions of the College official are in agreement with the student's request, the appropriate record will be amended. If not, the student will be notified within a reasonable period of time that the record will not be amended, and the student will be informed by the registrar or the vice president for student affairs of the right to a formal hearing. A request for a formal hearing must be made in writing to the chief academic officer (provost), who, within a reasonable period of time after receiving such request, will inform the student of the date, place and time of the hearing. Such a written request will be deemed a consent to disclosure to the hearing panel of the student's record to the extent necessary for the appeal to be considered and decided. The hearing will be conducted according to the challenge procedure adopted by the College. At the hearing, the student may present evidence relevant to the issues raised and may be assisted or represented at the hearings by not more than two people of the student's choice. The hearing panel that will adjudicate such challenges will be the chief academic officer (provost), the registrar if the challenge concerns a document maintained by the vice president for student affairs, the vice president for student affairs if the challenge concerns a document maintained by the registrar, two faculty members selected by the Faculty Steering Committee and two student members selected by Student Senate. No member of the hearing panel may have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing.

Decisions of the hearing panel will be final, will be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing, and will consist of a written determination which will include a summary of the evidence, the decision, and the reasons for the decisions, and will be delivered to all parties concerned. The panel may decide to revise or amend a record by inserting corrective information into the student's file, or to allow a record to stand. If the decision is unsatisfactory to the student, the student may place with the education record statements commenting on the information in the record or statements setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decisions of the hearing panel. The statements will be placed in the education record, maintained as part of the student record, and released whenever the record in question is disclosed.

A student has the right to submit a written complaint to the Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-4605, if the student believes the College has violated the student's right under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act.

Revisions, clarifications and changes may be made in this policy at any time and will be effective upon publication by e-mail, printed announcement distributed to all students, posting in a prominent location on campus, or any combination of those means, or publication in subsequent editions of the Student Handbook.

Annual Notification

Students will be notified of their FERPA rights annually by publication in the Student Handbook.

Types, Locations and Custodians of Records

The following is a list of the types of records that the College maintains, their locations and their custodians.

Types Location Custodian
Admissions Records Vice President for Student Affairs
Ferguson Building
Vice President
Cumulative Academic
Records
Registrar's Office
Ferguson Building
Registrar
Health Records Student Health Services
Cass Street Building
Director
Counseling Records Counseling Services
616 E. Michigan Ave.
Director
Financial Aid Records Office of Financial Aid
Ferguson Building
Director
Financial Records Accounting Office
Ferguson Building
Accounting
Manager
Placement Records Career Development
Ferguson Building
Director
Progress Records Registrar's Office
Ferguson Building
Registrar
Faculty Office
Individual Office
Instructor, Adviser
Disciplinary Records Vice President for Student Affairs
Ferguson Building
Vice President
Occasional Records (Student education records not included in the types above such as minutes of faculty committee meetings, copies of correspondence in offices not listed, etc.) Appropriate official will collect such records, direct the student to their location, or otherwise make them available for inspection and review The College official who maintains such occasional records

Calendar

First Semester, 2015-16

August 1
Final deadline for registered students to notify College of intention not to return for first semester, 2015-16. Remainder of general deposit forfeited for withdrawals after this date.

August 21
Residences open for all first-year and new transfer students at 8 a.m. First contract meal—lunch.

August 22
Residences open for all upperclass students at 8 a.m. First contract meal—dinner.

August 24
First day of classes. Final enrollment for all students.

August 31
Last day to drop and/or add a course

September 5
Krishna Janmashtami—Hindu

September 7
Labor Day. No classes.

September 8
Last day to register for credit/no credit option

September 14
Rosh Hashanah (sunset 9/13-sunset 9/15)—Jewish

September 17
Ganesh Chathurthi—Hindu

September 18
Paryushana—Jain

September 19
Family Weekend

September 23
Yom Kippur (sunset 9/22-sunset 9/23)—Jewish. Eid al Adha (sunset 9/22-sunset 9/26)—Islam.

September 28
Sukkot (sunset 9/27-sunset 10/4)—Jewish

October 9
Mid-semester

October 12-13
Fall break

October 14
Al-Hijra—Islam

October 16-18
Homecoming

October 19
Academic advising for second semester, 2015-16 (through October 27)

October 23
Ashura (sunset 10/22-sunset 10/23)—Islam

November 2
Last day to withdraw from a course with a grade of "W"

November 9
Online registration for second semester, 2015-16 (through November 19)

November 11
Diwali—Indian

November 25
Thanksgiving vacation begins. No classes. Residences close at 10 a.m. Last contract meal—breakfast.

November 26
Thanksgiving.

November 29
Residences open at noon. First contract meal—dinner.

November 30
Classes resume at 8 a.m.

December 4
Last day of classes. Final deadline for registered students to notify College of intention not to return for second semester, 2015-16. Remainder of general deposit forfeited for withdrawals after this date.

December 5-6
Reading day

December 7
Hanukkah (sunset 12/6-sunset 12/14)—Jewish

December 7-10
Final examinations. Residences close at 7 p.m. Last contract meal—dinner.

Second Semester, 2015-16

January 17
Residences open at noon for all students—no contract meals.

January 18
Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. No classes. Orientation for entering first-year and new transfer students. First contract meal—dinner.

January 19
First day of classes. Final enrollment for all students.

January 26
Last day to drop and add a course

January 29
Last day to remove incomplete grade from first semester, 2015-16

February 2
Last day to register for credit/no credit option

February 8
Chinese New Year

February 10
Ash Wednesday—Christian

February 15
Parinirvana—Buddhist

March 4
Mid-semester. Spring vacation begins at 5 p.m. Last contract meal—dinner. Residences close at 7 p.m.

March 13
Residences open at 10 a.m. First contract meal—dinner.

March 14
Classes resume at 8 a.m.

March 20
Spring Solstice

March 21
Online registration for fall semester, 2016-17 (through March 31). Naw Ruz—Baha'i.

March 25
Classes end at 1 p.m. Good Friday—Christian.

March 27
Easter—Christian

March 28
Last day to withdraw from class with a grade of "W"

April 11
Academic advising for first semester, 2016-17 (through April 21)

April 14
Baisakhi—Sikh

April 21
Honors Convocation. Elkin R. Isaac Student Research Symposium.

April 23
Passover (sunset 4/22-sunset 4/30)—Jewish

April 29
Reading day

April 30-May 4
Final examinations. Residences close for all underclass students at 9 p.m. Last contract meal for underclass students—dinner.

May 1
Orthodox Easter

May 5
Yom HaSho′ah (sunset 5/4-sunset 5/5)—Jewish

May 7
Commencement. Residences close for all students at 8 p.m..

Summer College, 2016

May 15
Residences open for Summer College residents at noon.

May 16-July 1
Summer College

August 1, 2016 is the final deadline for registered students to notify College of intention not to return for first semester, 2016-17. The remainder of general deposit forfeited for withdrawals after this date.

Dates in bold are religious holidays that may be cause for students to request an excused absence from class or other academic requirement. Dates in italics are during a weekend or break. They are important to note for purposes of scheduling class trips and extracurricular activities, as well as honoring campus diversity.

2015-16 Academic Catalog

Catalog of Entry Philosophy

Though graduation requirements of the College may change while a student is enrolled, it is expected that each student will meet the graduation requirements outlined in the Academic Catalog that is in effect at the time he or she entered Albion. The "catalog of entry" philosophy is considered applicable for students who leave the College and whose interrupted course of study is not longer than five years.

Catalog Changes

The Academic Catalog is a general summary of programs, rules, policies and procedures for academic and student life, and is provided for the guidance of students. However, the catalog is not a complete statement of all programs, rules, policies and procedures in effect at the College. In addition, the College reserves the right to change without notice any programs, rules, policies and procedures that appear in this catalog. The 2013-14 edition of the Academic Catalog was published August 1, 2013. Anyone seeking clarification on any of this information should consult with the Albion College registrar.

Non-Discrimination Statement

Albion College is committed to a policy of equal opportunity and non-discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age or disability, as protected by law, in all educational programs and activities, admission of students and conditions of employment. Questions or concerns about this College policy should be directed to the Human Resources Office.

Students who have learning disabilities should contact the Academic Skills Center.

Student Life

As a residential college, Albion is concerned with the growth and development of the whole student in a number of interrelated realms: intellectual, personal, social, spiritual, emotional, physical and vocational. The various programs described below assist students' education outside the classroom. Personal growth is encouraged and supported through programs that practice community development, healthful living and the ability to interact with people from different cultures and backgrounds. The vice president for student affairs is responsible for providing leadership to most of the programs and services below, all of which support the academic mission of the College and enhance the full educational experience.

Residential Living

Albion is a residential college and expects all of its students to live and board within the College residence system. As such, residential life provides opportunities for students to integrate the academic mission of the College with the out-of-class experience. The Office of Residential Life offers numerous programs and activities to meet students' educational and social needs.

Student Activities

An Albion education involves more than time in the classroom and library. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the wide range of opportunities available to them, including approximately 100 clubs and organizations, student government, publications, Greek organizations and athletics. The Office of Campus Programs and Organizations (CPO), located in the Kellogg Center, serves as a resource center for students, faculty and student groups.

Varsity Sports

Albion is a charter member of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA), founded in 1888. It is the oldest collegiate athletic conference in the United States.

For more information on intercollegiate sports for men and women, visit gobrits.com.

The First-Year Experience

Through the William Atwell Brown, Jr. and Mary Brown Vacin First-Year Experience, all first-year students enroll in a First-Year Seminar. This seminar is an important building block for Albion community development. With the First-Year Seminar as a basis, first-year students participate in structured experiences for personal, academic and professional growth that are facilitated by Student Affairs staff, faculty and student mentors.

Office of the Chaplain

As an institution founded by and related to the United Methodist Church, Albion College celebrates pluralism and spiritual development. The Office of the Chaplain embodies this commitment as it strives to create a welcoming and affirming environment, and prepare graduates to enter a diverse global workplace. "Spirituality" is understood in the broadest terms as a basic characteristic of every human, and therefore the office is here to serve all students.

Intercultural Affairs

In support of Albion's commitment to an inclusive, pluralistic and equitable community for learning, the Office of Intercultural Affairs works cooperatively with students, faculty, staff and the Albion community to heighten awareness of an appreciation for cultural, ethnic and racial diversity. Emphasis is placed on the development and implementation of educational programs and activities that assist in the transition and retention of under-represented students. These programs include an orientation and mentoring program.

Counseling Services

The Office of Counseling Services' mission is to help students solve problems and acquire the skills they need to reach their academic and life goals. Counseling Services assists students when emotional, relationship or psychological issues negatively impact their ability to make the most of their educational experiences at Albion.

Anna Howard Shaw Women's Center

Founded in 1985, the Anna Howard Shaw Women's Center coordinates programs focused on women for the Albion community. This includes organizing activities that raise awareness of women's issues, support women in their quests for empowerment and equality and build a collaborative community in which women's voices are heard and honored. For Women's History Month in March each year, the Women's Center, in coordination with the Women's and Gender Studies Committee, provides programming to honor Dr. Shaw's life and work by highlighting women's lives, interests and passions.

Student Health Services

Student Health Services (SHS) is open Monday through Friday and is staffed by registered nurses. In addition, the College physician and/or a physician assistant are available for scheduled appointments on a part-time basis. Students needing care after hours may visit the SHS Web site and use the online self-care guide or list of area walk-in clinics, or call a telephone support service. In addition, the Department of Campus Safety or Residential Life staff can provide more information. A Student Health Record with updated immunizations is required of all incoming students.

Campus Safety

The Department of Campus Safety is staffed with professional officers. The main objective of Campus Safety is to provide the campus community with a safe environment. The Department of Campus Safety is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, to respond to student, faculty and staff needs.

Student Regulations and Basic Principles of Responsibility

Attendance at Albion College is a privilege, and students are expected to conduct themselves in a responsible manner that reflects the ideals and educational aims of the College. Where student responsibility does not reflect this expectation, concern will be expressed and suitable action taken which may include suspension or permanent dismissal from the College.

To establish high standards and to encourage greater understanding and responsibility, College expectations, regulations and practices, including customs and traditions, are contained in the Student Handbook which is made available online to students each fall. For more information, see "Policies and Expectations" in the Student Handbook.

Liability Disclaimer

Albion College shall not be liable for any injuries to or property damages suffered by any student regardless of cause. This disclaimer of liability shall apply to, but not by way of limitation, the following:

  • Any injury or damage incurred on property owned by or under the control of the College, or its subsidiaries, such as classrooms, residence halls or other housing, any other structures, all common areas and grounds, and vehicles;
  • Any injury or damage incurred as a participant, spectator or otherwise in any intramural or intercollegiate or other event or contest, athletic or otherwise, or while in transit thereto or therefrom;
  • Any injury or damage suffered while engaged in or attending a classroom or related activity, whether required or elective, and regardless of cause;
  • Any injury or damage suffered by reason of theft, fire, damage by the elements or by other cause;
  • Any injury or damage suffered by reason of any act or omission of any College trustee, officer, member of the faculty or staff, employee, contractor or student.

By applying for admission or readmission to the College, or by continuing their enrollment with the College for a subsequent semester, students accept the foregoing disclaimer and agree to be bound thereby.

Insurance of Personal Belongings

The College does not insure personal effects of students. Therefore, it is recommended that students insure their belongings either through their parents' homeowner policy or a separate rental insurance policy.

The Albion Campus

In recent years, Albion's main campus has expanded so that it now includes more than 30 major buildings. The College is located in the city of Albion, a community of 9,000 founded in the 1830s along the banks of the scenic Kalamazoo River. The city is located 90 miles west of Detroit and 175 miles east of Chicago on Interstate 94.

The south boundary of the College is bordered by the Kalamazoo River's east branch. Interstate 94 business route borders the campus on the north, and the downtown shopping area is only a few blocks away.

Albion's original campus is today known as the Quadrangle, and from it have radiated the many new buildings erected during the past 30 years.

Experience more of the Albion Campus by taking a virtual tour.

Admission Office is located at the Bonta Admission Center, 100 N. Hannah St., one block south of Michigan Avenue. The Admission Office is open weekdays, Saturday mornings and by special appointment. The building is named for long-time dean of admissions Frank Bonta, '49.

Alumni Field serves Albion's varsity and intramural athletic programs for men and women, as well as the Kinesiology Department. The facility includes Sprankle-Sprandel Stadium, Schmidt-Fraser Football Field, Isaac Track, Joranko Baseball Field, Dempsey Softball Field, a varsity soccer field, varsity tennis courts, practice fields and the Beese-Havens Boathouse.

Astronomical Observatory, erected in 1883, houses a large refracting telescope and related equipment. Portions have been remodeled to house the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program. The building is a State of Michigan registered historical site.

Baldwin Hall Alumni Center, named for Dr. Charles W. Baldwin, a former College trustee, includes the student dining facilities.

Bellemont Manor is the colonial mansion that serves as a conference center, under the supervision of the College's Office of Dining and Hospitality Services. The mansion offers meeting rooms, lodging and dining facilities. Situated on a five-acre site one-half mile from campus, Bellemont Manor was built by Mr. and Mrs. George Dean in 1927-28 and was donated to Albion College in 1962.

Bobbitt Visual Arts Center, built in 1965, houses the Department of Art and Art History, and includes the Elsie E. Munro, '26, Art Gallery and one smaller gallery. It is named for long-time visual arts professor Vernon L. Bobbitt. The Center has studios for painting, sculpture, printmaking and other media. An adjacent ceramics facility was built in 1973.

Dean Hall is a cooperative residence for women. The facility, built in 1937 and located two blocks west of the campus, provides accommodations on a shared-work basis. The cooperative plan results in lower room and board costs than those of some other residence units.

Dickie Hall, a State of Michigan registered historical site, is one of Albion's oldest buildings. Construction began in 1857, although the facility was not completed until 14 years later. In this structure, the famous song "The Sweetheart of Sigma Chi" was written in the early 1900s. The building is named for Dr. Samuel Dickie, president of the College, 1901-1921. Originally housing the College chapel and offices, Dickie Hall is now incorporated into the Kellogg Center.

Dow Recreation and Wellness Center, located adjacent to Sprankle-Sprandel Stadium, is devoted to educational and recreational purposes, including individual and group sports activities, physical conditioning, and health and wellness programs. The building's Bernard T. Lomas Fieldhouse contains flexible court space for intramural basketball, volleyball and badminton as well as a 1/9-mile track. Also included in the facility, completed in 1988, are two racquetball courts, training and rehabilitation areas, a classroom, locker rooms and Department of Kinesiology offices. The building was made possible by a gift from the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation. The Fieldhouse is named for Dr. Bernard T. Lomas, president of the College, 1970-1983.

Incorporated into the Dow Center is the Dean Aquatic Center, completed in 1978 and named for W. Clark Dean, '21, a long-time Albion College trustee and benefactor. It contains a T-shaped pool, 25 yards by 25 meters. The pool's diving area has 1- and 3-meter diving boards. In 1999 the Ungrodt Tennis Center, containing four indoor tennis courts, was added at the north end of the Lomas Fieldhouse. The facility is named for Paul W. Ungrodt, Jr., '52, a College trustee.

Ferguson Student, Technology, and Administrative Services Building, completed in 2002, houses offices for the president and for five of the College's administrative divisions: academic affairs, finance and management, information technology, institutional advancement and student affairs. It brings together in one location a broad array of student services, including computing laboratories and instructional technology support. Located on the previous site of the Lottie L. Gassette Memorial Library, the building is named for trustee William C. Ferguson, '52, principal donor for the project.

Fraternity Houses were rebuilt in 1966 for all campus fraternal organizations by the College. The six fraternities in the complex are Alpha Tau Omega, Delta Sigma Phi, Delta Tau Delta, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu and Tau Kappa Epsilon.

Goodrich Chapel with its stately steeple dominates the Albion campus and serves as a landmark to travelers approaching the city. Chapel offices and classrooms house the Music Department. The building was dedicated in 1958 and is named in honor of Dr. F. S. Goodrich, professor of English Bible and a College chaplain for more than half a century. The sanctuary seats more than 1,400 persons.

Held Equestrian Center is a 341-acre facility located a short distance from the main campus. In addition to the Heathman Arena and a modern stable for boarding student-owned horses, it includes an outdoor ring and riding trails set amidst scenic hills and woodlands. Opened in 2004, the center is named for Nancy G. Held, professor and director of the Education Program, emerita.

Herrick Center serves the Theatre Department and has the principal college theatre, as well as a smaller studio theatre. It is named for Michigan industrialist Ray W. Herrick. The structure, located on the west edge of Alumni Field, was completed in 1975.

Kellogg Center, completed in 1996, serves as a meeting ground for the entire campus community. The facility features lounges, meeting rooms, student organization offices, all campus mailboxes, a grill/snack bar, a convenience store, the College Bookstore and the Office of Campus Programs and Organizations. Gerstacker Commons, a multipurpose area located within Kellogg Center, is available for any campus group planning concerts, lectures, dances or other events. The five-level Kellogg Center adjoins and incorporates historic Dickie Hall. The center is named for Kellogg Co. of Battle Creek, donor of the principal gift for the project.

Kresge Gymnasium includes the varsity basketball and volleyball court, along with the Ferguson Dance Studio. Completed in 1925 and totally remodeled in 1988, the building is named in honor of philanthropist Dr. Stanley S. Kresge, '23.

Kresge Hall houses classrooms, laboratories and research spaces, primarily for the study of biology and chemistry. Also included is the Ludington Greenhouse. Added to the science complex in 2005, the four-story facility is named for College trustee Bruce A. Kresge, '53, and was made possible, in part, by a $4.5-million grant from the Kresge Foundation.

Mudd Learning Center/Stockwell Memorial Library complex houses library collections and services, the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (FURSCA), and the Academic Skills Center.

The library contains over 350,000 books and non-print items, rare book collections, the College archives, and a collection of United States government documents which Albion receives as a depository library. The historical archives of the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church are also located in the library. A 2011 renovation of the Stockwell Library's main floor created the Cutler Commons which includes interactive study spaces, a one-stop services area and a café.

Built in 1938, Stockwell Memorial Library is named for Charles F. Stockwell, Albion's first principal, and is a gift of his daughter, Madelon Stockwell Turner, one of Albion's early graduates. The Wendell B. Will Faculty Room is on the second floor of the Stockwell building. The Mudd Learning Center, completed in 1980 and connected to Stockwell Library by an enclosed walkway, is named for Seeley G. Mudd, a physician and medical researcher.

Norris Center is a central lecture facility of the four-building science complex and is named for Dr. Louis W. Norris, president of the College, 1960-70. Built in 1969 and completely renovated in 2006, it contains the 340-seat Towsley Lecture Hall, the Mitchell Museum, classrooms and the Dow Analytical Science Laboratory.

Olin Hall, completed in 1983, houses the Departments of Communication Studies, Education, and Psychological Science, as well as the Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development. The three-story facility was built and equipped through a $4.5-million gift from the Olin Foundation. Olin Hall contains a large lecture room, classrooms, seminar rooms and research spaces.

Palenske Hall is another of the four buildings in Albion College's science complex. Housed in the four-level facility are classrooms, laboratories and research spaces for the study of geology, physics, mathematics and computer science. Built in 1969 and completely renovated in 2005, it is named for Fred C. Palenske.

Putnam Hall includes classrooms, laboratories and research spaces, for the study of chemistry, biology and mathematics. Part of the four-building science complex, it was constructed in 1969 and named for Mark E. Putnam, '10. It was completely renovated in 2006.

Robinson Hall, renovated in 1992, houses the Departments of Anthropology/Sociology, Economics/Management, History, and Political Science, as well as the Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service and the Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management. This structure is located on the site of the original Central Building, which was completed in 1843 but subsequently rebuilt with gifts from the late George O. Robinson.

Sorority Lodges are maintained by five of the six national sororities on campus. Although members do not live in the lodges, they use them for meetings, special dinners, studying and social functions. Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Xi Delta, Delta Gamma, Kappa Alpha Theta, and Kappa Delta maintain lodges. The sixth sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha, uses other meeting spaces on campus.

Student Residences include several buildings--Wesley Hall (1925) with its east and west additions (1956), Seaton Hall (1949), Mitchell Towers (1965) and Whitehouse Hall (1963). Wesley Hall was remodeled in 1986, Seaton Hall in 1993 and Mitchell Towers in 2002-03. Seaton Hall is named for Dr. John L. Seaton, president of the College, 1924-1945; Whitehouse Hall for Dr. William W. Whitehouse, president, 1945-1960; and Mitchell Towers for Dr. Peter T. Mitchell, '67, president, 1997-2007. All of Albion's student residences are coeducational with separate sections for men and women.

Several homes have been remodeled for special-interest housing, and a limited number of College-owned apartments are also available. The Mae Harrison Karro, '31, Residential Village (2001) houses up to 56 students in apartment-style units. The residence was made possible by a gift from Roy Karro in memory of his wife.

Vulgamore Hall, one of the oldest buildings on campus, was erected in 1854. Renovated in 1993, it houses the Departments of English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, and Religious Studies. The building was renamed in honor of Dr. Melvin L. Vulgamore, president of the College, 1983-1997.

Whitehouse Nature Center is a 144-acre preserve with scenic nature trails. Located on the Kalamazoo River and adjacent to the campus, it is used both for field instruction in the sciences and for quiet walks and observation. An Interpretive Center was built in 1977 to house a classroom, work space and a place for permanent nature displays. The Nature Center is named for Dr. William W. Whitehouse, president of the College, 1945-1960. For more information, visit the Nature Center Web site at: www.albion.edu/naturecenter/.

Albion's History

The College has a pioneering heritage, originally serving the educational needs of settlers' children and Indians alike. Albion also is one of the earliest Midwest schools to introduce coeducation.

Thanks to the efforts of Methodists who were early settlers of Michigan Territory, the College was awarded a charter by the Michigan Territorial Legislature in 1835. Early attempts at coeducation were made in 1850 when the legislature approved the founding of the "Albion Female Collegiate Institute." This school for women was controlled by the Wesleyan Seminary corporation until 1857 when the two schools merged under the name of "The Wesleyan Seminary and Female College at Albion."

On February 25, 1861, Albion was fully authorized by the State legislature to confer a full four-year college degree upon both men and women.

From the time the cornerstone was laid for the first permanent building in 1840 until today, Albion College has remained on the same site, the original part of which is now affectionately called "the Quad." In 1861 there were only two classroom buildings. By 1901, Albion had added a chapel, an observatory, a gymnasium, a chemistry building and a library.

Today Albion stands on 225 acres with more than 30 major buildings, and from 500 students in 1901, enrollment has grown to 1,300 students. Full-time faculty today number 126, and the College has over 23,000 living alumni.

Emphasis on excellence in liberal arts education became the Albion College hallmark through the years, and in 1940 Albion was the first private college in Michigan to be awarded a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. Today the College remains true to its liberal arts commitment.

The campus itself has also changed dramatically in recent years. Since 1975, Albion has built the Herrick Center for Speech and Theatre, Sprankle-Sprandel Stadium, the Whitehouse Interpretive Center, Dean Aquatic Center, Mudd Learning Center, Olin Hall, Dow Recreation and Wellness Center, Kellogg Center, the Mae Harrison Karro Residential Village, the Ferguson Student, Technology, and Administrative Services Building and Kresge Hall. In addition, many older campus buildings have been thoroughly renovated.

Albion's Principals and Presidents

Charles F. Stockwell, Principal, 1843-1845
Clark T. Hinman, Principal, 1846-1853
Ira Mayhew, Principal, 1853-1854
Thomas H. Sinex, President, 1854-1864
George B. Jocelyn, President, 1864-1869 and 1871-1877
J. L. G. McKown, President, 1869-1870
William B. Silber, President, 1870-1871
Lewis R. Fiske, President, 1877-1898
John P. Ashley, President, 1898-1901
Dr. Samuel Dickie, President, 1901-1921
John W. Laird, President, 1921-1924
Dr. John L. Seaton, President, 1924-1945
Dr. William W. Whitehouse, President, 1945-1960
Dr. Louis W. Norris, President, 1960-1970
Dr. Bernard T. Lomas, President, 1970-1983
Dr. Melvin L. Vulgamore, President, 1983-1997
Dr. Peter T. Mitchell, President, 1997-2007
Dr. Donna M. Randall, President, 2007-2013
Dr. Michael L. Frandsen, Interim President, 2013-2014
Dr. Mauri A. Ditzler, President, 2014-

Albion College Diversity Statement

A liberal arts education, by definition, should liberate minds. This process is enhanced in a community that is committed to educational equity, diversity and unrestricted inquiry. We seek therefore to foster an environment of mutual respect, acceptance, appreciation and caring for all members of our community. To this end, Albion College condemns all forms of discrimination and harassment, while reaffirming our commitment to academic free speech. We also commit ourselves to the recruitment and retention of both women and minority faculty, staff and students, the integration of cultural diversity in the curriculum, and the development of a truly inclusive multicultural campus environment.

Approved by the Albion College Faculty and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, 1991-92.

The Purpose of the College

Albion College is committed to liberal education in the arts and sciences. We believe such an education empowers individuals to live lives of constructive purpose and accomplishment, enriched by the confidence and pleasure that come from thinking logically, imaginatively and humanely. In light of this vision we seek to create and maintain, in a residential setting, a supportive, intellectually stimulating community which exhibits and prizes curiosity, creativity, dissent and diversity.

We believe in the fundamental worth of a broad exposure to intellectual and artistic achievement, to the best that has been thought and said about the world and our place in it. An Albion College education introduces students to classical modes of analysis, interpretation and argument; to unfolding scientific inquiry into the nature of the physical world; to the ways in which contemporary debates derive from and extend an historical but continuing dialogue about enduring questions.

At Albion College we invite students to engage in ongoing conversations centered upon their cultural heritage, yet responsive to global concerns. We believe our students will find their own voices by paying attention to the finest expressions of Western and other intellectual and spiritual traditions. Far from inviting a passive acceptance of such traditions, we encourage students to question and challenge them, to evaluate ethically the social uses they serve and the ends they advocate. In our view, a liberal education is an education in active citizenship and service.

Teaching and learning are central to our mission. This means that while the faculty are productive in scholarly and creative endeavors, their primary commitment is to teaching--specifically, to fostering the intellectual engagement and growth of students. The primary responsibility of students at Albion College is to develop mastery in the methods by which knowledge is acquired, critically evaluated, and appropriately applied. We believe such an emphasis prepares students for a lifetime of learning and a multiplicity of possible careers by developing their broad reasoning, writing and speaking abilities. While the classroom is at the heart of our educational mission, we believe that the entire College community should share in the learning experiences found in our residential setting and through involvement in out-of-classroom opportunities and experiences, including those in the City of Albion.

In recruiting new members to the College community, we seek men and women of intellectual promise from various racial, class, ethnic and geographic backgrounds, whose perspectives can contribute to a process of mutual education within and outside the curriculum. This aim can best be achieved in an environment where individuals value differences and enter into constructive dialogue toward common goals. By pursuing our educational mission, we believe all members of the Albion community will grow in the capacity to work, live and serve effectively with others.

Approved by the Albion College Board of Trustees, October 30, 1993.

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