Spanish

Faculty

The computer science faculty at Albion College are listed in the Mathematics section of this catalog.

Introduction

Computer science is the youngest of the liberal arts. It shares with mathematics strong historical ties as well as underlying values of abstraction, rigor and elegance. During its vigorous growth as an academic discipline, computer science has worked to map this abstraction onto physical devices. Computer science students will address significant problems: finite-precision arithmetic, limited storage capacity of data, and bounded processing capacity of a computer. They will develop distinct methodologies: programming languages, data encoding and the analysis of the complexity of algorithms in terms of time and space requirements. And they will experiment with some results distinctive to computer science: the existence of the general-purpose computer, serial and parallel processing, and modularity and layers of abstraction in both hardware and software. This deep understanding of computer science will engage the student in discerning the benefits and limitations of computers in society.

The study of algorithms is the theme underlying all aspects of computer science. Computer science students will learn to define a problem and specify a step-by-step solution at a level of detail and clarity unparalleled in any other discipline. They will also examine the practical issues of efficient storage, manipulation and retrieval of data.

Computer science interacts naturally with many other disciplines. Students will have opportunities to explore the interconnections among artificial intelligence, psychology and philosophy; to become involved in the physics and engineering of circuit design; to employ biological models in their study of genetic algorithms and neural networks; and to see aspects of grammar and linguistics in their study of programming languages.

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Website

Career Opportunities

Computer science graduates will enter a very favorable job market with opportunities in business, industry, government and private consulting. There is also a need for secondary school teachers with certification in computer science. The study of fundamental principles of computer science and the strong mathematical component of this major fortify students with the lifelong learning skills essential for success in this rapidly changing field. A degree in computer science provides a suitable background for graduate work in this or a related field.

Special Features

The E. R. Sleight Computing Laboratory contains a network of workstations dedicated for use by computer science students. These computers run individually or in parallel under the Linux operating system.

The Math/Stat Computing Laboratory is designed especially for students in computer science, mathematics and statistics. This computer laboratory features computers running Windows. Laser printers are available in these labs for high-resolution graphics and typesetting.

These laboratories are part of Albion's campus-wide computer network connecting faculty offices, residence hall rooms, classrooms, laboratories, public computer areas, printers and the library automation system. From computers on the network, students can access their files, run software on the campus network, interact with other computers, send electronic mail and browse the World Wide Web. Virtually every major programming language is available through these systems.

Each year the Mathematics and Computer Science Department awards approximately $30,000 in scholarships in honor of E. R. Sleight, a beloved mathematics professor who taught at Albion from 1908 to 1948. Prospective students with strong interests in computer science are encouraged to contact the department to apply for these scholarships. Additional awards are made to outstanding upperclass students in the mathematical sciences.

Computer science majors are eligible for the J. R. Lancaster Award presented to the student who best exemplifies the liberally educated student and for the Ronald C. Fryxell Prize presented to the outstanding senior in computer science. Each summer several students receive stipends as Kresge Fellows and from other sources for independent research projects in the mathematical sciences. Students participate in regional and national programming competitions. Internships and the Oak Ridge Science Semester provide additional opportunities for intensive computer science study.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major

  • All majors are required to complete successfully the six foundation courses: Computer Science 171, 173, 352, 354, 356, 358, plus two additional units of computer science courses numbered 200 or above and Computer Science 299, 399. The Mathematics and Computer Science Department may waive one or more of the foundation course requirements for students with advanced high school computer science preparation. Students may enroll in Internship (391, 392) and Directed Study (411, 412) in consultation with their advisers.
  • The following mathematics cognates are also required: Mathematics 141, 239, and one selected from 210 and 236.

Requirements for Minor

  • Five and one-quarter units in computer science in computer science 171, 173, and 299; plus three additional units at the 200-level or above. At last two of these three units must be selected from 352, 354, 356, or 358..
  • Mathematics 141, 239.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.

Other Requirements for All Computer Science Majors and Minors

  • Students are encouraged to elect cognates in a specific field of interest in consultation with their adviser. Possible cognate areas include, but are not limited to, mathematics, physics, philosophy, psychology and economics.
  • All computer science courses must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.
  • Students majoring in computer science are required to complete both 299 and 399: Colloquium in Mathematics and Computer Science. Students minoring in computer science are required to complete 299.
  • Students majoring or minoring in computer science are expected to furnish the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science with information about their course work and activities related to the department. The department faculty will use this information when nominating students for awards, scholarships and membership in professional societies, and as the basis for letters of recommendation. Students are encouraged to include this information on their personal World Wide Web pages or to develop a portfolio Web page for their activities related to their major.

Computer Science Courses

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science reserves the right to deny enrollment to students taking courses out of sequence as determined by prerequisites.

151 Information Technology (1)
Intended for the liberal arts student who wants to understand and better use information technology. Topics include how computers work, the Internet and World Wide Web, new trends in computing such as mobile computing and peer-to-peer networks, how software development differs from traditional manufacturing, how computing is changing our culture and laws, current trends in computer crime, security, and privacy. Additional topics are drawn from current events and issues. Laboratory. Does not count toward the computer science major or minor. Connamacher.

171 Introduction to Computer Science I (1)
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor.
Designed to be the first computer science course taken by students in mathematics and science, as well as those wishing to major in computer science. Topics include fundamentals of computation and algorithmic problem-solving, data types, control structures, the object-oriented programming paradigm and applications. Introduces a high-level programming language such as Java or Python. Connamacher, Reimann.

172 Accelerated Introduction to Computer Programming (1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Intended for students receiving AP or transfer credit for CS 171. It is recommended that such students take this course prior to enrolling in additional computer science courses.
An overview of programming in the same high-level language used in CS 171. Connamacher, Reimann.

173 Introduction to Computer Science II (1)
Prerequisite: Computer Science 171.
A continuation of Computer Science 171. Emphasizes advanced object-oriented programming (interfaces, multiple inheritance, reflections), abstract data types (stacks, queues, lists, strings, trees, graphics, etc.) and analysis of algorithms. Other topics include recursion, searching and sorting, simulation and an introduction to some of the advanced areas of computer science, e.g., computer organization, artificial intelligence and user interfaces. Students refine their programming skills in a high-level programming language such as Java or Python. Connamacher, Reimann.

256 Practicum in Programming Languages (1/4)
Prerequisite: Computer Science 171 or permission of instructor.
Designed to teach an additional computer language beyond those currently used in the computer science courses. Emphasizes writing and debugging programs that use the special features of the language. FORTRAN and C are the languages that have been taught most recently. Special sections of this course have been offered that are devoted to developing problem-solving skills in computer programming. Staff.

261 Computers, the User and Society (1)
Prerequisite: Computer Science 171.
An examination of how computers are used and how computers fit into society. Topics include user interface design, human-centered software development and evaluation, software reliability, social context of computers, professional and ethical responsibilities for technology professionals, intellectual property rights, privacy and civil liberties, computer crime. Offered every third year. Connamacher, Reimann.

263 Operating Systems and Networks (1)
Prerequisite: Computer Science 173.
The role of operating systems, concurrency and deadlock avoidance, memory management, client-server models, device management, networking, LANs and WANs, TCP/IP, network architectures, security, trends in networks such as wireless networks and the Internet. Offered every third year. Reimann.

265 Database Programming (1)
Prerequisites: Computer Science 173 and Mathematics 239.
Fundamental concepts of database management systems: the relational data model, relational algebra, and normal forms, file organization and index structures, and the query language SQL and embedded SQL. Offered every third year. Connamacher, Reimann.

271 Artificial Intelligence (1)
Prerequisites: Mathematics 239 and Computer Science 173.
Basic techniques of artificial intelligence including knowledge representation and reasoning, problem-solving and planning, game playing, and learning. Covers AI programming and languages. Offered every third year. Connamacher.

273 Computer Graphics and Image Processing (1)
Prerequisites: Computer Science 173 and Mathematics 236 or 247.
A unified introduction to image synthesis and image analysis aimed at students with an interest in computer graphics, computer vision or the visual arts. Covers the basics of image generation, image manipulation and digital special effects. Includes a significant programming project using the OpenGL programming interface. Offered every third year. Connamacher, Reimann.

275 Software Development (1)
Prerequisite: Computer Science 173.
An introduction to the techniques of developing large software projects including unit testing, version control and build management. Covers the popular industrial languages C and C++ and includes a large-group programming project. Offered every third year. Connamacher, Reimann.

299 Colloquium in Mathematics and Computer Science (1/4)
Prerequisite: Mathematics 143 or Computer Science 173.
Selected topics in mathematics and computer science as presented by students, departmental faculty and visiting speakers. Requirements include written summaries of each presentation and a paper on a mathematics/computer science topic of personal interest. Same as Mathematics 299. Staff.

316 Numerical Analysis (1)
Prerequisites: Mathematics 236 or 247, and Computer Science 171.
Methods of obtaining numerical solutions to mathematical problems. Stresses the implementation and error analysis of algorithms. Topics include solution of non-linear equations, systems of equations, interpolating polynomials, numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solutions to ordinary differential equations, and curve fitting. Offered in alternate years. Same as Mathematics 316. Mason.

326 Operations Research (1)
Prerequisites: Mathematics 236 or 247, and Mathematics 245.
An introduction to computational methods in mathematical modeling including linear programming and Markov chains. Applications in business, economics and systems engineering. Knowledge of probability will be helpful. Offered in alternate years. Same as Mathematics 326. Mason.

352 Algorithms (1)
Prerequisites: Mathematics 239 and Computer Science 171.
Focuses on the design and efficiency of algorithms. Covers the basic algorithm paradigms including graph traversals, greedy algorithms, divide and conquer, dynamic programming and flow algorithms. Introduces complexity theory, NP-completeness and polynomial-time reductions. Additional topics may include approximation algorithms, randomized algorithms and linear programming. Offered in alternate years. Connamacher.

354 Computer Organization (1)
Prerequisite: Computer Science 173.
Organization of digital computers: digital logic, arithmetic, assembly language, data paths, memory, input-output, secondary storage devices, multiprocessors and computer performance. Programming tools and techniques are also discussed with emphasis on their application in assembly language. Offered in alternate years. Reimann.

356 Programming Languages (1)
Prerequisite: Computer Science 173.
A survey of the structure of programming languages and programming as an abstract concept. Topics include syntax and semantics, scope rules, environments, types, procedures, parameters, overloading, parametric polymorphism and inheritance. Projects include programming in the functional paradigm using the Scheme programming language and development of a language interpreter. Offered in alternate years. Connamacher.

358 Foundations of Computing (1)
Prerequisites: Mathematics 239 and Computer Science 171.
The theoretical underpinnings of computer science: models of computation including automata, Turing machines, circuits, the Chomsky language hierarchy, Church’s thesis, computable and noncomputable functions, recursive and recursively enumerable sets, reducibility and introduction to complexity theory. Connamacher.

360 Mathematical Modeling (1)
Prerequisites: Mathematics 247 and Computer Science 171.
An introduction to analytical methods in mathematical modeling including nonlinear optimization, dynamical systems and random processes. Applications in physics, biology, economics and systems engineering. Knowledge of probability and statistics will be helpful. Same as Mathematics 360. Mason.

388, 389 Selected Topics (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Topics in computer science such as recursive function theory, computational complexity, formal languages, automata and algorithms. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

399 Colloquium in Mathematics and Computer Science (1/4)
Prerequisites: Mathematics 299 and senior standing.
Selected topics in mathematics and computer science as presented by students, departmental faculty and visiting speakers. Requirements include written summaries of each presentation, a departmental major assessment examination, and an oral presentation on a mathematics/computer science topic of personal interest. Offered only on a credit/no credit basis. Same as Mathematics 399. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Staff.

Faculty

Maureen Balke, chair and professor.
B.A., 1974, Marquette University; B.M., 1978, M.M., 1980, D.M. (vocal performance and pedagogy), 1991, Indiana University. Teachers and coaches include Lorna Warfield, Martha Lipton, Gianna d'Angelo and Carol Smith, Martin Katz, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Dalton Baldwin, Gerhard Hüsch. Post-doctoral studies at the CIFM International Music Institute in Nice, France; the Mozart Opera Studies Institute in Kaprun, Austria; the Aston Magna Academy on Schubert (NEH Fellowship); the Schubert Lied and Keyboard Festival, Westminster Choir College; and the International Festival of the Art Song. Certified Level III Somatic Voicework™—The LoVetri Method. Appointed 1988.

David W. Abbott, professor.
B.M., 1977, Eastman School of Music; M.M., 1980, The Juilliard School; D.M.A., 1995, Eastman School of Music. Appointed 2005.

James S. Ball, professor.
B.M. (trombone), 1974, Oberlin Conservatory of Music; M.M. (trombone), 1982, Georgia State University; M.M. (orchestral conducting), 1983, Northwestern University; D.M.A. (orchestral conducting), 1992, Conservatory of Music, University of Missouri-Kansas City. Appointed 1999.

Lia Jensen-Abbott, staff lecturer.
B.M. (piano performance), 1995, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; M.M., (piano performance and pedagogy), 1999, M.A. (music theory and music history), 2003, Pennsylvania State University; D.M.A. (piano performance), 2006, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Performer Diploma, 2006, Indiana University.

Samuel D. McIlhagga, associate professor.
B.Mus.Ed., 1992, Grand Valley State University; M.M. (wind conducting), 1993, Northwestern University; Ph.D. (music education), 2006, University of Minnesota. Appointed 2003.

Clayton G. Parr, associate professor.
B.A. (vocal performance), 1980, Albion College; Teaching Certificate, 1981, Michigan State University; M.M. (choral conducting), 1987, M.M. (vocal performance), 1989, D.M.A. (choral conducting), 1990, Michigan State University. Appointed 2012.

Applied Music Faculty

Takeshi Abo, adjunct instructor, violin and viola.
B.M. (violin performance), 1994, Kyoto City University of Arts; M.M. (violin performance), 1997; D.M.A. (violin performance), 2006, Michigan State University.

Emily Benner, adjunct instructor, voice and opera/musical theatre workshop.
B.M., 1995, M.M., 1997, D.M.A., 2005, University of Michigan.

Igor Cetkovic, adjunct instructor, cello.
Postgraduate Degree, 2008, University of Stavanger, Norway; M.M., 2011, Central Michigan University; D.M.A. candidate, Michigan State University.

Robert Doyle, adjunct instructor, voice.
B.M., 1985, Michigan State University; M.M., 1992, University of Texas, Austin; M.M. candidate in organ and church music, University of Michigan. Certified Level III Somatic Voicework™—The LoVetri Method.

Cynthia Duda, adjunct instructor, bassoon.
B.M., 1999, Bowling Green State University; M.M., 2003, Western Michigan University; D.M.A. candidate, Michigan State University.

Ellen Grafius, adjunct instructor, harp.
B.M.E., 1970, Michigan State University.

Robert Johnson, adjunct instructor, double bass.
B.M., 2009, Central Michigan University; M.M., 2011, D.M.A.candidate, Michigan State University.

John King, adjunct instructor, voice and opera/musical theatre workshop.
B.M.E., 1972, Central Michigan University; M.M., 1974, University of Colorado.

Nicholas Laban, staff accompanist.  
B.A., 2011, Albion College; M.M., 2013, Western Michigan University.

Tess Miller, adjunct instructor, flute.
M.M., 2001, D.M.A., 2004, Michigan State University.

James Otto, adjunct instructor, horn.
B.Mus.Ed., 1979, M.M., 1985, University of Michigan.

Daniel Palmer, adjunct instructor, guitar.  
B.A., 2011, Albion College; M.M., 2013, University of Toledo.

Gabriel Renteria, adjunct instructor, oboe.
B.M., 2004, Oberlin Conservatory; M.M., 2006, University of Washington.

Stacy Root, adjunct instructor, elementary music education.
B.A. (music education), 2002, M.A. (music education), 2010, Michigan State University.

Elena Melinda Solero, accompanist.
B.M., 1982, DePauw University; M.M., 1984, Bowling Green State University.

Wesley Warnhoff, adjunct instructor, clarinet and saxophone.
B.M., 2010, Missouri State University; M.M., 2012, Michigan State University; D.M.A. candidate, Michigan State University.

Steve Wulff, adjunct instructor, percussion and drum set.
B.M. (performance), 2008, Michigan State University; M.M. (performance), 2010, University of South Carolina.

Introduction

Music is one of the oldest disciplines in the liberal arts, and thus represents one of the traditional fields of knowledge. Integration with other disciplines is represented well within the department, for music brings people in contact with great literature such as drama and poetry, with dance, with historical and sociological trends, and with religious and philosophical ideas.

One of the most important contributions provided by the Music Department is the opportunity for self-expression, either individually or with others. The stimulation and enjoyment derived from music springs from study, self-examination and criticism, discipline, knowledge of other disciplines that bear upon musical interpretation, and a desire to achieve excellence. These are liberating, civilizing, sensitizing influences upon humanity in any age and in any place; they help prepare students for rich and rewarding lives.

The philosophy and mission of Albion College are reflected in four primary goals of the Music Department: (1) To be an artistic presence on the campus and to share the rich heritage of great music with students, faculty and community; (2) To expose students to and involve them with the creative process through music, to heighten students' sensitivity to themselves and others, and to introduce them to a broad range of significant music; (3) To develop an understanding of music, impart knowledge of music and increase musical skills by means of courses offered within the framework of the liberal arts; (4) To provide courses and curricula for music majors so they may have the necessary foundation for graduate study, teaching, performing, or other career-oriented goals.

The Music Department offers courses for a broad range of students—from those who aspire to a musical career to those who wish to develop their avocational interests in music. Membership in all performing ensembles and opportunities for private music lessons are open to all students regardless of major. Albion has an excellent library of books, musical scores, recordings and stereo listening equipment—all available for student use. Albion College is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

The Music Department offers three music curricula: (1) music major; (2) music major with performance emphasis; and (3) music major with music education emphasis. These programs are listed below with an explanation of the purpose and the requirements for each.

Music Department Website

Career Opportunities

Career possibilities for Albion music graduates include public and private school teaching, private teaching, music or arts management, church music and professional performance. Many of our music graduates elect to attend graduate school to further prepare themselves for their chosen careers.

Special Features

Interested students may take advantage of off-campus study and apprenticeships made available through the GLCA in New York and Philadelphia. Foreign study is available as well.

Vocal students are regularly sent to state and regional National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) competitions. They also take part in a musical and/or opera workshop on an annual basis. Opportunities for instrumentalists include the Intercollegiate Honor Band.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major (8 units)

The eight-unit liberal arts music major is for students who have strong musical interests but who do not necessarily intend to pursue a full-time professional career in music. This major may not be used as a major in the elementary or secondary education program. Students interested in teaching music in the public schools should enroll in the 12 1/2 unit music major with music education emphasis. Students should begin their study by enrolling in the following courses in the fall: Music 100, Music 101, an applied music lesson (one-half unit) and a departmental ensemble. If enrolling in the ensemble for credit will cause a student to exceed 4.5 units the ensemble may be audited.

Students selecting this curriculum must complete eight units in music as follows:

  • Four units in music theory: 101, 102, 201 and 202.
  • Two units in music history: 313, 314.
  • Two units in applied music (private lessons). One-half unit in conducting may be substituted for one-half unit in applied music by permission of music staff.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.

In addition:

  • Students are expected to take applied music lessons each semester they are in residence.
  • Students are required to participate in at least one of the major performing organizations most appropriate to their primary performance medium (marching/symphonic band, orchestra, choir, jazz ensemble) each semester the student is enrolled in this curriculum. Keyboard performers may satisfy this requirement through accompanying; guitarists should make special arrangements with the chair of the Music Department.
  • Students must attend seven approved campus recitals and concerts per semester. Specific details concerning approved recitals and concerts and other information is in the Music Department Student Handbook and may be obtained from the Music Department Office.
  • Successful completion of the keyboard laboratories in 101, 102, 201 and 202 will satisfy the piano proficiency requirement.

Requirements for Major with Performance Emphasis (12 1/2 units)

The music major with performance emphasis is for students who intend to study music within a broad spectrum of liberal arts studies. The emphasis in performance may lead to a career in music as a private music teacher, church musician or performer or provide preparation for graduate school. It is assumed that this introductory course sequence will be supplemented by further studies in music. Students should begin their study by enrolling in the following courses in the fall: Music 100, Music 101, an applied music lesson (one-half unit), and a departmental ensemble. If enrolling in the ensemble for credit will cause a student to exceed four and one-half units, the ensemble may be audited.

Students selecting this curriculum must complete 12 1/2 units in music and other requirements as follows:

  • Seven and one-half units in music: 101, 102, 201, 202, 216/217/218 (two of three), 313, 314 and 401.
  • Four units in applied music (private lessons). Students must enroll for one-half unit each semester. During any semester that an off-campus program is elected, students are expected to arrange to take applied study.
  • One unit elective in voice/piano/instrument classes, pedagogy, church music, literature or conducting. Vocal performance students are encouraged to elect Diction for Singers during their freshman or sophomore year.
  • All courses for the major with performance emphasis must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • At the end of the first semester of the sophomore year, students' performance level and academic progress toward the major will be evaluated by the faculty.
  • Students at the senior level will present a full solo recital, or combination solo recital and small ensemble performance in which he or she is a participant in solo capacity. With the approval of the department, a research paper or project may be elected in lieu of the senior recital. The Music Department also encourages a recital, either entire or shared, at the junior level.
  • Students are required to participate in at least one of the major music performing organizations most appropriate to their primary performance medium each semester (marching/symphonic band, orchestra, choir, jazz ensemble). Keyboard performers may satisfy this requirement through accompanying; guitarists should make special arrangements with the chair of the Music Department.
  • Students must attend seven approved campus recitals and concerts per semester. A student attending Albion for four years must attend 56 concerts/recitals to graduate. Specific details concerning approved recitals and concerts and other information is in the Music Department Student Handbook and may be obtained from the Music Department Office.
  • Successful completion of the 101, 102, 201 and 202 keyboard laboratories will satisfy the piano proficiency requirement.

Requirements for Major with Music Education Emphasis (12 1/2 units)

The major with music education emphasis provides certification for students who intend to teach music in grades K-12 for private and public schools. Students should begin their study by enrolling in the following courses in the fall: Music 100, Music 101, an applied music lesson (one-half unit) and a departmental ensemble. If enrolling in the ensemble for credit will cause a student to exceed four and one-half units the ensemble may be audited.

Students selecting this curriculum must complete 12 1/2 units in music and other requirements as follows:

  • Major—Seven and one-half units in music: 101, 102, 201, 202, 216/217/218 (two of three), 313, 314 and 401.
  • Music Education Minor (required for teaching certificate) — Five units in specialized music performance courses, including three and one-half units in applied music (at least three units must be in a single performing area); one-half unit in voice/piano/guitar classes; one-half unit in Music 230; and one-half unit in Music 330 or 331. Specific recommendations for students whose principal performing area is keyboard, voice or an instrument are available from the Music Department.
  • During any semester that an off-campus program is elected, students are expected to arrange to take applied study.
  • Teacher Certification Requirements—Students in this curriculum must complete the required units of professional education courses taken through the Shurmur Center. Vocal students must elect Music 325 and 328, Education 202, 203, 373, 396, 423 and 432 plus one and one-half units selected from Music 240-246. Instrumental students must elect Music 322 and 325, Education 202, 203, 373, 396, 423 and 432 plus one and one-half units selected from Music 240-246. (Certification for secondary vocal music education alone requires one unit less than the K-12 music certification. Students interested in this alternative should contact the Music Department for specific details.)
  • In order to complete the music education program in four years, students wishing to go off-campus should only do so in the fall semester.
  • All courses for the major with music education emphasis must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • At the end of the first semester of the sophomore year, students' performance level and academic progress toward the major will be evaluated by the faculty.
  • Students at the senior level will present a full solo recital, or combination solo recital and small ensemble performance in which he or she is a participant in solo capacity. With the approval of the department, a research paper or project may be elected in lieu of the senior recital. The Music Department also encourages a recital, either entire or shared, at the junior level.
  • Students are required to participate in at least one of the major music performing organizations most appropriate to their primary performance medium, each semester (marching/symphonic band, orchestra, choir, jazz ensemble). Keyboard performers may satisfy this requirement through accompanying; guitarists should make special arrangements with the chair of the Music Department.
  • Students must attend seven approved campus recitals and concerts per semester. A student attending Albion for four years must attend 56 concerts/recitals to graduate. Specific details concerning approved recitals and concerts, carryover of excess credits or of deficits, and other information is in the Music Department Student Handbook and may be obtained from the Music Department Office or online at http://www.albion.edu/music/ (look under "Music Majors").
  • Successful completion of the 101, 102, 201 and 202 keyboard laboratories will satisfy the piano proficiency requirement.

Music Courses

100 Music Major Seminar (0)
Prerequisite: Open only to music majors.
Designed to provide declared music majors with a broad range of music listening and music performance experiences in order to develop the skills and characteristics necessary to be informed, successful and fulfilled as a well-rounded musician and educated audience member. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

101 Theory I (1)
Prerequisite: Open only to music majors, or with permission of instructor.
An introduction to Western musical language through studies in fundamentals (key signatures, intervals, scales, rhythmic notation, etc.), chordal and melodic structures, and basic four-part harmonization. Focuses on intensive training in sight-singing (with solfege) and ear-training activities, an introduction to music software for notation and ear training, and development of keyboard proficiency through participation in a required weekly keyboard laboratory. Keyboard laboratory sessions concentrate on basic reading and harmonization skills at the keyboard, as well as development of the technical ability to perform elementary repertoire. Lecture and keyboard laboratory. Jensen-Abbott.

102 Theory I (1)
Prerequisite: Music 101 or advanced placement by means of a departmental examination.
A continuation of studies begun in Music 101, with emphasis on further exercises in and analysis of four-part harmonization, secondary chord function, musical form and exercises in stylized composition. Sight-singing, ear-training and technology application continue. Keyboard laboratory sessions continue to develop reading, harmonization, and basic theory skills as related to piano playing. Further development of technical skills allows the study of early intermediate repertoire. Lecture and keyboard laboratory. Jensen-Abbott.

110 Rock-and-Roll in Society (1)
Study of the origins, characteristics and stylistic development of rock-and-roll music from the early 1950s to the present through the frameworks of race, gender/ethnicity, politics, and popular culture. Designed for the non-music major. Course fee. McIlhagga.

111 Music Appreciation (1)
Designed for the non-music major who wishes to gain an appreciation of music as a fine art. The musical elements of style, form and design are investigated primarily through listening. Not open to music majors. Staff.

113 Introduction to Opera (1)
An introductory course designed for both the music major and non-major. Concentrates on the most frequently performed operas of Mozart, Puccini, Verdi and Wagner. Extensive use of video tapes of opera performances with sub-titles. Offered in alternate years. Balke.

120 Music Performance as a Creative Process (1)
Corequisites: Music 121, 122, 124, 125, 131 or 132.
Designed to give students the tools necessary to think, discuss and write critically about music both within and outside of their respective ensemble "labs." Through reading, writing and listening assignments, students will become more aware of the elements involved in musical interpretation. McIlhagga.

133 Opera Workshop (1/2)
Provides opportunity for involvement in the production of operas or opera scenes from auditions through performance. Covers all aspects of opera from vocal roles to technical support. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

137 Piano Chamber Music Ensemble (1/4)
Prerequisites: Music major and permission of instructor.
Develops ensemble skills for pianists playing in duos with a second pianist or in mixed ensembles such as trios for piano and strings, etc. Topics include balance, rhythmic precision and pedaling, as well as overall phrasing and interpretation. Abbott, Jensen-Abbott.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

192 Guitar Class I (1/4)
Basic development of both classical and plectrum guitar skills. Intended for students with little or no previous training. No applied music tuition fee charged. Palmer.

193 Guitar Class II (1/4)
Prerequisite: Guitar Class I or permission of instructor.
A continuation in the development of music reading skills using easy classical, traditional tunes and technical exercises. No applied music tuition fee charged. Palmer.

194 Guitar Class III (1/4)
Prerequisite: Guitar Class II or permission of instructor.
A continuation of Guitar Class II. No applied music tuition fee charged. Palmer.

201 Theory II (1)
Prerequisite: Music 102 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of the studies begun in Music 101 and 102 with a special emphasis on chromatic harmony. A further study of form and exercises in stylized composition. Sight-singing and ear-training continue. Jensen-Abbott.

202 Theory II (1)
Prerequisite: Music 201 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of the studies begun in Music 101, 102 and 201 with a special emphasis on form. An introduction to the materials and techniques of twentieth and twenty-first-century music. Sight-singing and ear-training continue. A major analysis paper is required. Jensen-Abbott.

205 Jazz Improvisation (1)
Prerequisite: Music 101 recommended.
An introduction to the art and craft of jazz improvisation through a study of the theoretical, historical, philosophical and aesthetic factors surrounding its past, present and future performance practice. Course material is designed to develop thinking and reacting skills needed for performance through assignments in repertoire, scales, keyboard harmony skills and melodic patterns. Offered in alternate years. Ball.

216 Piano Literature (1/2)
An historical, melodic, and harmonic overview of some of the major piano works by the most significant composers of the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. Designed to enhance a music major’s understanding of works considered to be the standards in piano and chamber music. Offered in alternate years. Jensen-Abbott.

217 Instrumental Literature (1/2)
An historical, melodic, and harmonic overview of some of the major instrumental musical works by the most significant composers of the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. Designed to enhance a music major’s understanding of works considered to be the standards in orchestral, band and chamber music. Offered in alternate years. McIlhagga.

218 Choral Literature (1/2)
An historical, melodic, and harmonic overview of some of the major choral works by the most significant composers of the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. Designed to enhance a music major’s understanding of works considered to be the standards in choral music. Offered in alternate years. Parr.

220/221 Diction for Singers (1/2, 1)
A concentrated course on the basics of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) including application of this system to the correct stage pronunciation and artistic performance of standard classical solo repertoire (art song, opera) in English, Italian, German and French. Balke.

230 Introduction to Conducting (1/2)
Prerequisite: Music 102 or permission of instructor.
Fundamentals of conducting vocal and instrumental ensembles. (1) basic beat patterns; (2) score analysis; (3) instrument and voice ranges and transpositions; and (4) some practical aspects of rehearsing. Lecture and laboratory. Ball.

240 Brass Teaching and Techniques (1/2)
Provides practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of all brass instruments including trumpet, French horn, trombone, euphonium and tuba. Primarily intended for students pursuing their teacher certification in music. A secondary instrument lab ensemble is also a corequisite for this course. Offered in alternate years. Otto.

242 Woodwind Teaching and Techniques (1/2)
Provides practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of all woodwind instruments including flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and saxophone. Primarily intended for students pursuing their teacher certification in music. A secondary instrument lab ensemble is also a corequisite for this course. Offered in alternate years. Miller.

244 Stringed Teaching and Techniques (1/2)
Provides practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of all bowed string instruments including violin, viola, cello, and string bass. Primarily intended for students pursuing their teacher certification in music. A secondary instrument lab ensemble is also a corequisite for this course. Offered in alternate years. Abo.

246 Percussion Teaching and Techniques (1/2)
Provides practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of all percussion instruments including snare drum, timpani, mallet instruments, as well as most other percussion instruments utilized in an instrumental ensemble. Primarily intended for students pursuing their teacher certification in music. A secondary instrument lab ensemble is also a corequisite for this course. Offered in alternate years. Wulff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

313 Music History I (1)
Prerequisite: Music 201 or permission of instructor.
A course in the history of music designed for junior and senior music majors.
Covers music from the ancient Greeks through the seventeenth century. In addition to regular examinations, assignments stress stylistic characteristics of a period or of an individual composer. There is assigned listening. Abbott.

314 Music History II (1)
Prerequisite: Music 201 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of Music 313 covering music from the eighteenth century to the present. In addition to examinations and analysis assignments, students complete a major research paper by the end of the semester that investigates some aspect of contemporary Western music or deal with non-Western music. Abbott.

319 Evolution of Jazz (1)
An exploration of the rich cultural background and evolution of jazz music through discussion of important performers, composers, educators and critics with respect to their contribution to the development of the art form. Emphasis is placed on developing critical listening skills through the extensive use of landmark recordings and live performances. Offered in alternate years. Ball.

322 Teaching of Instrumental Music in the Schools (1)
Prerequisite: Music 230.
Required of all instrumental music education majors. Designed to acquaint the student with all aspects of teaching, developing, planning, directing and administering public school instrumental music programs, K-12. Offered in alternate years. McIlhagga.

325 Teaching of Music in the Elementary School (1)
Prerequisite: Music 230.
Designed to give the student a knowledge of a well-rounded music program for the elementary grades. Creative experiences, demonstrations and practical work in performing and listening are stressed. Lecture and laboratory. Offered in alternate years. Root.

328 Teaching of Choral Music in the Secondary School (1)
Prerequisite: Music 230; Music 330 is strongly recommended.
An introduction to all aspects of the music program for the secondary school and the techniques for administering the program. Lecture and laboratory. It is strongly recommended that Music 330 (Choral Conducting) be elected prior to 328. Offered in alternate years. Parr.

330 Choral Conducting (1/2)
Prerequisite: Music 230.
Laboratory work in choral conducting and score reading with practical experience in techniques of training choral ensembles. Required of all choral music education majors. Offered in alternate years. Parr.

331 Instrumental Conducting (1/2)
Prerequisite: Music 230.
Laboratory work to develop techniques and skills required for instrumental conducting and score reading. Students may be given the opportunity to conduct instrumental ensembles on campus. Required of all instrumental music education majors. Offered in alternate years. Ball.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internships (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Staff.

Ensembles

Students performing in ensembles have the option of electing them for credit or not for credit. If credit registration would cause the unit enrollment to exceed four and one-half, the student may elect an audit registration, for which no fee will be assessed. Up to two units of ensemble credit
may be included among the total required for graduation.

121 Marching Band/Symphonic Band (1/4)
Open to all wind or percussion students by audition. Auditions are held one week prior to the beginning of the fall semester during pre-season rehearsals. After marching season, students continue in symphonic band until the end of the semester. McIlhagga.

122 Symphonic Band (1/4)
Available for all wind or percussion students. Admission is by audition given during November and/or the first week of the spring semester. McIlhagga.

123 Jazz Combo (1/4)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Available to student instrumentalists and singers interested in performing in a combo setting within the jazz idiom. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Ball.

124 Jazz Ensemble (1/4)
Available to wind and percussion students interested in playing all styles of jazz. Admission is by audition given during the first week of classes. Ball.

125 Symphony Orchestra (1/4)
Open to all students by audition. Auditions are held the first week of each semester; students should bring one prepared solo. Ball.

126 String Ensembles (1/4)
Open to string students and pianists who are interested in performing chamber music. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Permission of instructor required. Staff.

127 Woodwind Ensembles (1/4)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Available for woodwind students who are interested in performing chamber music from all periods. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Staff.

128 Brass Ensembles (1/4)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Available for brass students who are interested in performing brass chamber music. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Staff.

129 Percussion Ensemble (1/4)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Available for percussion students who are interested in playing music for percussion. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Wulff.

130 Guitar Ensemble (1/4)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Open to all guitar students who are interested in performing chamber music. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Palmer.

131 Concert Choir (1/4)
Open to all students by audition. Auditions are held during the first four days of classes in the fall. Parr.

132 Briton Singers (1/4)
Members are selected from the Concert Choir by audition during the first week of classes in the fall. Parr.

Applied Music (Private Lessons)

Students who wish to elect private lessons must register for them during the regular College registration period. The appropriate course numbers for the private lessons are listed in the online Class Schedule. Students may not elect more than 1/2 unit in applied music unless a written request for permission is submitted and approved by the Music Department. All students enrolled in applied music must elect it for credit and take jury examinations at the conclusion of each semester of study. Fees are listed in the Tuition and Fees section. Non-music majors are encouraged to elect applied music. Students enroll for organ study by permission of instructor.

Lessons in piano, voice, organ, guitar, and all other string, percussion, woodwind and brass instruments offered. Each 1/4 or 1/2 unit.

One 1/2-hour lesson per week plus 6 hours practice—1/4 unit.
One one-hour lesson per week plus 12 hours practice—1/2 unit.

Faculty

Dianne P. Guenin-Lelle, chair, professor, and Howard L. McGregor, Jr., Professor of the Humanities.
B.A., 1979, University of New Orleans; M.A., 1983, University of Louisiana, Lafayette; Ph.D., 1988, Louisiana State University. Appointed 1987.

Teresa Hancock-Parmer, visiting assistant professor.
B.A., 2004, Ball State University; M.A., 2009, Ph.D., 2014, Indiana University. Appointed 2015.

Perry W. Myers, professor.
B.A., 1979, M.B.A., 1981, Baylor University; M.A., 1997, Ph.D., 2002, University of Texas, Austin. Appointed 2004.

Marcie A. Noble, staff lecturer.
B.A., 1997, M.A., 2003, Ph.D., 2014, Western Michigan University. Appointed 2009.

Kalen R. Oswald, associate professor.
B.A., 1995, Utah State University; M.A., 1997, Ph.D., 2001, University of Arizona. Appointed 2002.

Emmanuel T. Yewah, professor.
Licencié-es-Lettres, 1978, Maîtrise, 1979, Université de Yaoundé; M.A., 1982, Ph.D., 1987, University of Michigan. Appointed 1986.

Introduction

A student of modern languages and cultures at Albion can major in French, German or Spanish. A modern language major entails extensive study of the literature and culture of a particular speech community, and it presupposes for all majors a high level of linguistic performance. Similar linguistic capabilities are expected of students who seek a minor. Specific curricula and other requirements are designed to help achieve these goals. The faculty has been chosen based on proven teaching ability, professional reputation, and varied backgrounds and points of view.

Special Features

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the off-campus programs and other international experiences offered at Albion College. Albion's off-campus programs in Argentina, Austria, Cameroon, Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, France, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Sénégal and Spain offer immersion in French, German or Spanish culture and language. Other international off-campus programs are available to students as well (e.g., Belgium, China, Japan and Russia).

Albion College offers language-learning housing for modern language teaching assistants and language students in French, German and Spanish. This residence—called the "I-Space"—serves as a "living laboratory" where Albion College students can practice their conversational skills with fellow students and native speakers. Students speak the intended language within their living quarters and participate in weekly cultural activities organized by the teaching assistants.

French, German and Spanish students attend the Modern Language Conversation Tables held at least once per week in the I-Space.

Departmental Policy on Advanced Placement Credit and Placement

Students may obtain college credit according to their scores on a standardized Advanced Placement (AP) language examination administered at their high schools. A score of 3 merits one-half unit, a 4 merits one unit and a 5 merits one and one-half units of credit at Albion College. A maximum of one unit may be applied toward a major or minor in French, German or Spanish.

Before Student Orientation, Advising and Registration (SOAR) and during the first week of fall semester, the department administers an online placement test for students with prior study of French, German or Spanish. Students with two or more years of high school modern language course work are expected to take the placement test before enrolling in language courses at Albion. This test does not give college credit; its purpose is to place such students at the appropriate level.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major

In most cases a major may be earned in French, German or Spanish by completing a minimum of eight units of study at the 201-level or higher, including the courses specified in the sections on each language (see below for specific details on the different major tracks in each language). Only one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward a major or minor. Students considering a major in a modern language are urged to consult with a faculty member in the department early in the freshman or sophomore year. Off-campus study in an approved study abroad program is required for all majors, and highly recommended for minors. (In the Language and Culture for the Professions minor, an internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience is required.) If individual situations prevent this,the student should speak with the department chair.

Prior to their second language study at Albion College, students are placed in the level most appropriate for their experience. Students will start at the level in which they are placed, and no retroactive credit toward major or minor programs will be awarded.

All majors are required to have at least one semester, preferably a year, of residence in the I-Space language-learning housing and credit for Modern Languages and Cultures 110. If circumstances prevent a student from living in the I-Space, then the student must consult with the department chair.

It is recommended that all majors take cognate courses, for example in English, history, anthropology and sociology, relating to their language of study. Double majors are also encouraged.

Modern Languages and Cultures Courses

Modern Languages and Cultures

105 Intercultural Understanding and Global Issues (1)
Explores theoretical models of how cultures are derived and what it means to interact across cultural boundaries. Applies these theoretical models to selected global issues in order to demonstrate the potentialities and hazards of negotiation of global issues across borders. Useful for preprofessional students who want to attain the skills and knowledge to effectively function in an international/intercultural context. Taught in English. Myers.

107 "Our Americas": Crossing Borders, Cultures and Histories (1)
Serves as a conceptual foundation for the TransAmerican Latino Studies track. An introduction to the cultural dynamics between North and South America, focusing on the interconnectedness of the Western Hemisphere in terms of space, cultures and histories. Taught in English. Pérez Abreu.

110 Language-Learning Residency and Participation in Programs (1/4)
Includes residency in language-learning housing for one semester and active participation in weekly programs in the student’s respective living area as well as in cultural events. Staff.

345 Methods of Teaching Modern Languages and Cultures (1)
Explores the role and purpose of the American educational system as it relates to foreign language teaching; teaches active learning strategies grounded in proficiency-oriented language instruction; allows students to begin to realize their potential as foreign language teachers. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Staff.

French Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major in French

In the French program students learn the language and culture of the French-speaking world. The 100- and 200-level courses focus on how to function within a French-speaking environment, through appropriate language use and cross-cultural understanding. Courses numbered 303-315 are designed to be taken before off-campus study in a French-speaking program and those numbered 351-355 to be taken after return from off-campus study.

The upper-level courses emphasize area studies. Interdisciplinary in scope, they focus on the culture of a particular area or time period and examine the relevant literature as well as social issues, artistic movements, political change, religious influences and film.

The intent is to prepare students for international careers in which they will draw on their communication skills in French, and on their understanding of the history and culture of the French-speaking world.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of eight units at the 201-level or higher, including: one unit from 303-315; one unit from 351-355; and a Senior Seminar (French 400, 1/4 unit). (See detailed description of requirements for major at beginning of Modern Languages and Cultures section.)
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program. (If individual situations prevent this, the student should speak with the department chair.)

Requirements for Minor in French

  • A minimum of six units at the 201-level or higher, including at least four units at the 301-level or higher.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in French Language and Culture for the Professions

As the world continues to become increasingly diverse across traditional borders and cultural boundaries, there will be more demand in the workplace and for communities to effectively negotiate otherness--different ways of living lives--which will directly impact professional practices.

Knowledge of a modern language and culture will continue to grow in importance as a foundation for functioning successfully in a global economy across many professions. This track in French is intended for those students who are pursuing preprofessional studies in fields such as economics and management, communication studies, science or public policy, among others, or for those students who are pursuing more traditional liberal arts fields and wish to add a practical component to their education. This track will provide a combination of preprofessional courses in the target language and cultural courses in order to prepare students for working in a culturally diverse world and economy. Students will be expected to attain high linguistic competence.

Qualified students may choose a "fast track" language program at an approved summer institution domestically or a language/internship program abroad during the summer after their freshman year. To qualify for this special program, a student must complete an interview to be conducted by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. For information about College policies on transfer credit, see the section of this catalog entitled General Academic Regulations.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of nine units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105; French 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; French 303; a seminar (French 401, 1/2 unit); and the remaining units selected from 300- or 400-level French courses. The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the major requirements.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Minor in French Language and Culture for the Professions

  • A minimum of six units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105 (OR French 303 with permission of the department); French 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; French 303; and the remaining unit selected from 300- or 400-level French courses.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in French with Secondary or K-12 Education Certification

  • A minimum of eight units at the 300-level, including: 301 and 302; one unit focusing on France (French 314, 315, 320); one unit focusing on the French-speaking world (French 352, 353, 354, 355); a Senior Seminar (French 400, 1/4 unit). (See detailed description of requirements for major at beginning of Modern Languages and Cultures section.)
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Education 338 or 339 (see Education Department), and Education 371 (K-12).
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Minor in French with Secondary Education Certification

  • A minimum of six units at the 300-level, including: 301 and 302, one unit focusing on France (French 314, 315, 320), one unit focusing on the French-speaking world (French 352, 353, 354, 355) and a Senior Seminar (French 400, 1/4 unit). (See detailed description of requirements for major at beginning of Modern Languages and Cultures section.)
  • Education 338 or 339.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

French Courses

Courses

101 Elementary French (1)
Introduces the French language and the francophone cultures through the study of basic grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Develops the four skills—listening, speaking, reading and writing—necessary for effective interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication. Conducted in French. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. French 101 is recommended for students with two years or less of high school French. Staff.

102 Elementary French, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 101.
Continuation of French 101. Expands vocabulary, grammar and cultural knowledge to enable a more informed interpretation and production of spoken and written communication in French. Conducted in French. Tutorials with teaching assistants integrated into the course. Staff.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

201 Intermediate French (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 102, equivalent or appropriate score on departmental placement test.
Continuation of the study of the French language and culture through the contextualized study of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Continues the development of the four basic skills necessary for the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Authentic tapes and texts are the foundation of the teaching materials. Conducted in French. Tutorials with native speakers are integrated into the course. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

202 Intermediate French, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 201, equivalent or appropriate score on departmental placement test.
Continuation of French 201. Practice with more sophisticated dialogues, reading of unedited short stories, poems and other authentic materials reflecting the various cultures of the French-speaking world. Conducted in French. Tutorials with native speakers integrated into the course. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 Advanced Oral and Written Expression I (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 202, equivalent or appropriate score on departmental placement test.
Development of communication skills in French relative to grammar, syntax, appropriate registers, necessary vocabulary, non-verbal communication and culturally specific idiomatic usage. Also includes the processes of conversation development, thesis formation and strategies for argumentation within French cultural norms, as well as key contemporary issues of importance in the French-speaking world. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

302 Advanced Oral and Written Expression II (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
Development of communication skills in French relative to grammar, syntax, appropriate registers, necessary vocabulary, non-verbal cues and culturally-specific idiomatic usage, as well as skills in French/English and English/French translation. Also includes the processes of conversation development, thesis formation and strategies for argumentation operating within French cultural norms, especially relating to professional life and the workplace. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

303 French for the Professions (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
Offers insights on the French and other French-speaking countries' work environment and the specialized knowledge necessary to communicate effectively in specific professions. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

314 Multicultural France: Current Issues and Historical Perspectives (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
Explores French society as a dynamic multicultural construct—France's changing place in the world, the changing role of women in French society and changing demographics, especially North African immigrants to France—through reading recent novels or short stories representing these issues. Studies the historical dimensions of the social phenomena and the historical reasons for the current situation. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

315 Writing/Filming France Inside Out (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
Applies various theories—narratology, explication de texte, and theories of adaptation—to critically inquire into the construction of literary texts and their filmic representations. Stresses oral and written communication in French. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

320 French Women Writers and Feminist Criticism (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
Analysis of works by French women writers from the Middle Ages to the present, as well as works of feminist critical theory. Offered every three years. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle.

330 French Louisiana: The Cajun and Creole Experiences (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
A study of French Louisiana in both Acadiana and New Orleans, through literature, music, history and other avenues. Guenin-Lelle.

351 French Society from Marie de France to Louis XIV (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
Incorporates literature, art, history and l'histoire des idées, or changing epistemologies, during the French ancien régime (the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the baroque and classical periods of the seventeenth century and the beginning of the Enlightenment in the early eighteenth century). Examines central issues such as the place of "the Divine" and humankind in the universe, the role of classical antiquity relative to traditions, identity and power, the role of women in society and the role of education as a vehicle for change. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

352 Francophone Cultures on the Internet: Fictionalité, Realité, Hypertextualité (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
A study of the theoretical construction of francophone cultures, their representation on the World Wide Web and the problems associated with Web-based cultural research. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

353 Francophone Africa (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
A study of texts and contexts of francophone (Central and West) African societies through in-depth analyses of history, politics, music, art, film and literature, and especially, how those elements have shaped the people's contemporary world view. Conducted in French. Yewah.

354 The French Caribbean: Les Antilles créoles (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
Surveys post-colonialism, la créolisation, le métissage and changing identities. Topics include history and geography of these islands, situating them as part of the New World as well as having enduring cultural, linguistic and political bonds with France; Aimé Césaire and his essentialist quest for identity via Africa and the past; la créolisation, as first proposed by Glissant; and contemporary social issues, represented in literature, art and cinema. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

355 Quebec: A World Apart (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
Examines socioeconomic, political, cultural, literary and artistic forces as well as relevant historical situations that have shaped this French-speaking "island" in anglophone North America. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

398 Practicum (1/2)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Experience in teaching French in the classroom or with individual students under the supervision of an instructor. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

400 Senior Seminar (1/4)
Prerequisite: Declared French major or minor.
Students will reflect on lessons learned in the French program, identify competencies they have developed in French and in other areas of study, understand the importance of these competencies in today's world, and leave Albion more confident in their preparedness to enter the next stage of their professional development. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Special topics in languages, literature or civilization for advanced students. Conducted in French. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Staff.

German Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major in German

Students in the German program study the German language and learn about the social and cultural history of the German-speaking world. Courses at the 100- and 200-level focus on acquiring a basic proficiency in German, an understanding of German culture and an insight into how language and culture are connected.

The upper-level courses are interdisciplinary in scope and focus on different areas of German cultural studies and intellectual history. Their intent is to provide students with a greater understanding of multicultural issues past and present, as well as an awareness of German literary and social history.

A major in German is an excellent preparation for students considering graduate school in a number of different fields, including but not limited to German, history and political science, as well as for international careers, which will draw on students’ ability to read, write and speak German as well as their understanding of and ability to interact with German culture.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of eight units at the 201-level or higher, including 301.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program. (If individual situations prevent this, the student should speak with the department chair.)

Requirements for Minor in German

  • A minimum of six units at the 201-level or higher, including 301.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in German Language and Culture for the Professions

As the world continues to become increasingly diverse across traditional borders and cultural boundaries, there will be more demand in the workplace and for communities to effectively negotiate otherness—different ways of living lives—which will directly impact professional practices.

Knowledge of a modern language and culture will continue to grow in importance as a foundation for functioning successfully in a global economy across many professions. This track in German is intended for those students who are pursuing preprofessional studies in fields such as economics and management, communication studies, science or public policy, among others, or for those students who are pursuing more traditional liberal arts fields and wish to add a practical component to their education. This track will provide a combination of preprofessional courses in the target language and cultural courses in order to prepare students for working in a culturally diverse world and economy. Students will be expected to attain high linguistic competence.

Qualified students may choose a “fast track” language program at an approved summer institution domestically or language/internship program abroad during the summer after their freshman year. To qualify for this special program a student must complete an interview to be conducted by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. For information about College policies on transfer credit, see the section of this catalog entitled General Academic Regulations.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of nine units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105; German 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; German 303; a seminar (German 401, 1/2 unit); and the remaining units selected from 300- or 400-level German courses. The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the major requirements.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Minor in German Language and Culture for the Professions

  • A minimum of six units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105; German 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; German 303; and the remaining unit selected from 300- or 400- level German courses.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in German with Secondary or K-12 Education Certification

  • A minimum of eight units at the 300-level, including: 301 and 302; one unit from historical and cultural studies sequence (306, 307, 350); one unit from text and cultural production sequence (312, 316, 355); and one unit from German ethnic and environmental studies sequence (310, 314).
  • Education 338 or 339 (see Education Department), and Education 371 (K-12).
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward a major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Minor with Secondary Education Certification

  • A minimum of six units at the 300-level or higher, including: 301 and 302; one unit from historical and cultural studies sequence (306, 307, 350); one unit from text and cultural production sequence (312, 316, 355); and one unit from German ethnic and environmental studies sequence (310, 314).
  • Education 338 or 339.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

German Courses

Courses

101 Elementary German (1)
Note: Students who have taken more than one year of German in high school must take the placement test before enrolling in this course. Introduction to German language and culture through the contextualized study of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Study and practice in the four language skills—listening, reading, writing and speaking—necessary for the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Conducted primarily in German. Tutorials with native speakers are required. Myers.

102 Elementary German, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 101 or equivalent.
Continuation of German 101. Expansion of vocabulary, work with more complex grammatical structures. Tutorials with native speakers are required. Myers.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

201 Intermediate German (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 102 or equivalent.
Continuation of the study of German language and culture through the contextualized study of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Continues the development of the four basic skills necessary for the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Authentic tapes and texts are the foundation of the teaching materials. Conducted in German. Tutorials with native speakers are required. Myers.

202 Intermediate German, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 201 or equivalent.
Continuation of German 201. Practice with more sophisticated dialogues, reading of unedited short stories, poems and other authentic materials. Conducted in German. Tutorials with native speakers are required. Myers.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 German Conversation and Composition (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 202 or equivalent.
Development of speaking, listening and writing skills; selective review of complex grammatical structures. Practice speaking about everyday situations in different ways (e.g., role play, dialogues, skits, oral reports); use of audio tapes. Writing of exercises and compositions with emphasis on correctness of expression, stylistic appropriateness and idiomatic usage. Learning of specialized vocabulary and idioms; writing of different types (e.g., dialogues, letters, journals, essays). Myers.

302 German Conversation and Composition, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent.
Continuation of practice in speaking, listening and writing skills; selective review of complex grammatical structures. Practice speaking about everyday situations in different ways (e.g., role play, dialogues, skits, oral reports); use of audio tapes. Writing of exercises and compositions with emphasis on correctness of expression, stylistic appropriateness and idiomatic usage. Learning of specialized vocabulary and idioms; writing of different types (e.g., dialogues, letters, journals, essays). Myers.

303 German Language and Culture for the Professions (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Intended to improve students’ communicative skills in German and provide knowledge for the professions. Covers aspects of the German business world such as banking, marketing and organizational structures. Assignments include development of marketing strategies and development of a business plan for a start-up venture. Myers.

306 German Cultural History: From Germania to Nation State (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Introduces pivotal moments and figures in German cultural history from the Roman Empire to the creation of the first German nation-state in 1871. Provides a deeper understanding of German-speaking culture and society as well as the constructed nature of all forms of national identity. Myers.

307 German Cultural History: Empire, Stunde Null, Reunification (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Explores the radical transformations in German society and culture from the late Wilhelminian era to reunification at the end of the twentieth century through the combination of historical texts, literature, film and “eyewitness” documentation. Situates German cultural history in the larger context of world history. Offered every third year. Myers.

308 Crime Stories and the Nazi Past (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Begins with a brief literary exploration of Christian morals and ethics that developed after the Reformation, then turns to the Romantic fascination with good and evil. Explores early twentieth-century examples of pseudo-crime stories to address such questions as why the German crime fiction tradition emerged so late relative to the British, French or American traditions, or why the “hard-boiled school” only began in Germany during the 1980s. Closes with several detective novels that illustrate how Germans after World War II have sought to come to terms with the Nazi past. Myers.

314 Multiculturalism in Germany (World War II to present) (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or permission of instructor.
Explores how German society has become multiculturally constructed since World War I—from the Holocaust aftermath to current sociocultural debates about the role and treatment of women of color, the large Turkish immigrant population, and Islam and Islamic nationalism in Germany—through the study of various discourses (fiction, essay, speeches, poetry, film, TV news) representing these issues. Studies how perceptions of ethnic difference have evolved in Germany and have become intertwined with social and political debates of the day. Conducted in German. Myers.

316 Crisis in Language: A Literary Survey (1890-1945) (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or 302 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Includes a selection of German works from different genres (plays, short fiction, poetry, theoretical texts) and films from the era 1890-1945. Focuses on each work as a cultural representation of the historical context in which it was written or produced, exploring how each was engaged with the social, political and cultural transformations of the era (e.g., social Darwinism, crisis of narration and language, bourgeois morals, the individual and society, the role of the artist, the Third Reich). Myers.

356 German Film (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
The historical contextualization of German films beginning during the early part of the twentieth century through the post-1989 era. Explores various themes in a specific national setting, while linking to important cultural, political and social issues beyond Germany: (1) the increasing degradation and isolation of the worker in capitalistic society and the breakdown of social class models; (2) emergence of Fascist ideology and the culpability of all Germans for its disaster; (3) the German attempt to come to terms with the past after World War II, but also as Germany sought to reunify after 1989. Through outside readings and in-class discussions considers how all of these films illustrate important German and European, as well as global, social and cultural historical transformations. Myers.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

398 Practicum (1/2)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Experience in language teaching in the classroom or with individual students under the close supervision of a regular instructor. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Special topics in languages, literature or civilization for advanced students. Conducted in German. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Staff.

Spanish Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major in Spanish

  • A minimum of eight units at the 201-level or higher, including: 301, at least two units from 302 through 315, and at least two units from 350 through 402.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program. (If individual situations prevent this, the student should speak with the department chair.)

Requirements for Minor in Spanish

  • A minimum of six units at the 201-level or higher, including: 301, at least one unit from 302 through 315, and at least one unit from 350 through 402.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in Spanish Language and Culture for the Professions

As the world continues to become increasingly diverse across traditional borders and cultural boundaries, there will be more demand in the workplace and for communities to effectively negotiate otherness—different ways of living lives—which will directly impact professional practices.

Knowledge of a modern language and culture will continue to grow in importance as a foundation for functioning successfully in a global economy across many professions. This track in Spanish is intended for those students who are pursuing preprofessional studies in fields such as economics and management, communication studies, science or public policy, among others, or for those students who are pursuing more traditional liberal arts fields and wish to add a practical component to their education. This track will provide a combination of preprofessional courses in the target language and cultural courses in order to prepare students for working in a culturally diverse world and economy. Students will be expected to attain high linguistic competence.

Qualified students may choose a “fast track” language program at an approved summer institution domestically or language/internship program abroad during the summer after their freshman year. To qualify for this special program a student must complete an interview to be conducted by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. For information about College policies on transfer credit, see the section of this catalog entitled General Academic Regulations.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of nine units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105; Spanish 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; Spanish 303; a seminar (Spanish 401, 1/2 unit); and the remaining units selected from 300- or 400-level Spanish courses. The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the major requirements.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Minor in Spanish Language and Culture for the Professions

  • A minimum of six units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105 or another Spanish course above 303; Spanish 201, 202, 301 or equivalent; Spanish 303; and the remaining units selected from 300- or 400-level Spanish courses.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in TransAmerican Latino/a Studies

Contemporary North and South America have been and continue to be defined by the movement of people immigrating, migrating and transmigrating. As the United States continues to be impacted by the growing demographic, cultural, political and economic presence of Spanish-speaking communities, we face an increased demand to understand the dynamic cultural exchange between the northern and southern hemispheres of the Americas.

The TransAmerican Latino/a studies track is an interdisciplinary opportunity intended for students who seek to be proficient in the Spanish language, while acquiring an understanding of Chicano/a, U.S. Latino/a, Latin American and Caribbean identities. This program is designed to enable students in many fields (anthropology, business, communications, economics, education, health care, law, marketing, international relations, and political science, among others) to gain the linguistic competencies and the cultural aptitudes necessary to effectively work and develop productive ties in this rapidly changing world. By analyzing a broad array of Spanish-language cultural and literary productions, students will develop critical thinking skills in a second language. In addition to high linguistic competency, the TransAmerican Latino/a studies track provides an interdisciplinary perspective that may include courses in the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, English, political science and ethnic studies. This multifaceted approach to the cultures of the Americas and Spanish language will prepare students to engage in a lifelong dialogue on contemporary issues.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of nine units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 107; Spanish 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; Spanish 306 or 307, 362; and a seminar (Spanish 401, 1/2 unit). The remaining units to complete the nine-unit requirement can be selected from Spanish 302, 303 or 304; 306 or 307; 315, 350, 361, 402 (provided the topic of the course deals with the Americas). The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the major requirements.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program in the Americas.
  • History 142, 270, or 301, or approved courses in anthropology and sociology, political science, English and ethnic studies may count toward the major with departmental permission.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Minor in TransAmerican Latino/a Studies

  • A minimum of six units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 107; Spanish 201, 202, 301 or equivalent; Spanish 362; a seminar (Spanish 401, 1/2 unit). The remaining units to complete the six-unit requirement can be selected from Spanish 302, 303, or 304; 306 or 307; 315, 350, 361, or 402 (provided the topic deals with the Americas). The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the minor requirements.
  • Students are placed in the 200- or 300-level language courses according to proficiency. Students must fulfill the six-unit requirement beginning at the level into which they are placed.
  • History 142, 270, or 301, or approved courses in anthropology and sociology, political science, English and ethnic studies may count toward the minor with departmental permission.
  • A maximum of one unit Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in Spanish with Secondary or K-12 Education Certification

  • A minimum of eight units at the 300-level or higher, including: 301; 302, 303, or 304; one unit from courses focusing on Latin America (306, 314, 361), one unit from courses focusing on TransAmerican Latino/a studies (307, 362); and one unit from courses focusing on Spain (305, 360).
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program in the Spanish-speaking world.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Education 338 or 339 (see Education Department) and Education 371 (K-12).
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Minor in Spanish with Secondary Education Certification

  • A minimum of six units at the 300-level or higher, including: 301; 302, 303, or 304; one unit from courses focusing on Latin America (306, 314, 361); one unit from courses focusing on TransAmerican Latino/a studies (307, 362); and one unit from courses focusing on Spain (305, 360).
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Education 338 or 339.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Spanish Courses

Courses

For those students with previous experience in Spanish, a placement test will be used in order to determine the appropriate entry-level course. Only those students who have had no previous experience with Spanish may initially enroll in Spanish 101. In order to ensure classes of relatively equal skill levels, the professor reserves the right to reassign any student who does not seem appropriately qualified for the course in which he or she has enrolled.

101 Elementary Spanish (1)
Introduces Spanish language and Hispanic culture through the contextualized study of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Develops the four essential skills—reading, writing, listening and speaking—necessary for the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

102 Elementary Spanish, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 101, appropriate score on departmental placement test or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Spanish 101. Expands vocabulary, grammar and cultural knowledge to enable a more informed interpretation and production of written and spoken communication in Spanish. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

201 Intermediate Spanish (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 102, appropriate score on departmental placement test or permission of instructor.
Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Increased emphasis on conversation, composition and cultural awareness. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

202 Intermediate Spanish, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 201 or permission of instructor.
Continued review of language structure, with particular emphasis on developing conversational skills. Improves fluency through conversation and discussion of writing assignments and literary and cultural readings. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 Advanced Oral and Written Expression (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 202, appropriate score on departmental placement test or permission of instructor.
Development of communication skills in Spanish relative to grammar, syntax, appropriate registers, necessary vocabulary, non-verbal cues and culturally specific idiomatic usage. Also includes the processes of conversation development, thesis formation and strategies for argumentation operating within Hispanic cultural norms, as well as key contemporary issues of importance to the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

302 Advanced Oral and Written Expression through Hispanic Film (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Development of communication skills in Spanish relative to grammar, syntax, appropriate registers, necessary vocabulary, non-verbal cues and culturally specific idiomatic usage. Also includes the processes of conversation development, thesis formation and strategies for argumentation operating within Hispanic cultural norms, as well as key contemporary issues of importance to the Spanish-speaking world. Improves fluency through the viewing, analysis and interpretation of Hispanic film. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

303 Spanish for the Professions (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Designed for students who are interested in studying Spanish in the context of activities related to the professional world (business, health care, education, finance, law, social work, etc.). Emphasizes the specialized vocabulary of the professional world and requires a working knowledge of Spanish grammar. Includes topics ranging from specific professions, to generalized professional concerns, to translation. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

304 Advanced Oral and Written Expression through Creative Writing (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Focus will vary, but may include the following: “Spanish/Latin American/ U.S. Latino Theatre,” “Spanish/Latin American/ U.S. Latino Short Story” and “Spanish/Latin American/ U.S. Latino Poetry.” Introduces the respective genre through readings of literary works and critical and theoretical studies. Includes development of a portfolio of creative writing projects produced individually and collaboratively. Conducted in Spanish. Oswald.

305 Multicultural Spain: Historical Perspectives and Current Issues (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Explores Spanish society as a dynamic multicultural construct—Spain’s changing role in the world; the intersection of Castilian, Galician, Andalusian, Catalan and Basque cultures; shifting demographics, etc.—through the study of historical and literary texts, media sources, and other pertinent cultural artifacts. Studies the historical dimensions of the social phenomena and the historical reasons for the contemporary social, political and cultural situation. Conducted in Spanish. Oswald.

306 South American Identities and Cultural Perspectives (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Examination of past, present and future struggles for identity and cultural perspective in South America, with a focus on the Southern Cone and Andes regions. Explores cultural artifacts such as music, visual arts, performance arts, literature, popular culture and folklore in South America from the pre-Columbian period to the twenty-first century. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

307 Cultural Encounters: Caribbean, Mexico and Central America (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Examines past, present and future struggles of cultural encounters and production in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, Mexico and Central America. Explores cultural artifacts such as music, visual arts, performance arts, literature, popular culture and folklore from the legacy of the pre-Columbian period to the twenty-first century and considers this region’s growing interaction with the United States. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

314 Storytellers (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the workings of storytelling. Focuses on the short story as a genre to explore the different ways of narrating through key literary and cultural movements that have defined the Spanish-speaking world, including the oral and pre-Columbian traditions, romanticism, modernism and magical-realism. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

315 Hispanic Studies: Textual Analysis and Interpretation (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the analysis, interpretation and appreciation of Hispanic literature and culture, focusing on a variety of cultural artifacts from the Spanish-speaking world (literature, painting, music, film, etc.). Special attention will be given to theoretical concerns. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

350 Women in Hispanic Literature (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 314 or 315 or permission of instructor.
Emphasizes careful reading and discussion of Hispanic prose, poetry and drama, with critical skills being applied particularly to the analysis of female characters and/or to the perspective of women authors. Writing assignments assess students’ comprehension of texts and ability to apply analytical skills within the context of a gender-based theoretical framework. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

360 Key Issues in Spanish Literature and Culture (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 305 or 314 or 315, or permission of instructor.
Analysis of a special problem, topic, issue, phenomenon, period, author, genre or movement in Spanish literature and/or culture from its beginning to the present. Conducted in Spanish. Oswald.

361 Key Issues in Latin American Literature and Culture (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 306 or 314 or 315, or permission of instructor.
Analysis of a special problem, topic, issue, phenomenon, period, author, genre or movement in Latin American literature and/or culture from its beginning to the present. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

362 Key Issues in U.S. Latino/Chicano Literature and Culture (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 307 or 314 or 315, or permission of instructor.
Analysis of a special problem, topic, issue, phenomenon, period, author, genre or movement in U.S. Latino or Chicano literature and/or culture from its beginning to the present. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

398 Practicum (1/2)
Experience in language teaching in the classroom or with individual students under the close supervision of a regular instructor. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 314 or 315 or permission of instructor.
Variable topic seminar. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Directed studies generally are reserved for those students who have schedule conflicts between two majors. They are also available for students pursuing honors theses. In specific cases, students may request directed studies that cover topics beyond the scope of the current curriculum. These students are expected to present their proposed plan of study to the instructor for approval well in advance of registration. Staff.

More Articles ...