Spanish

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major

  • Nine units in English, including
    • Any three of the following: 151 or 152, 253, 255, 256, 257, 258, 261 (3 units)
    • One of the following: 203, 205, 206, 207, 223, 275, 307, 308, 321, 322 (1 unit)
    • One additional unit in English (1 unit)
    • At least four units in English courses at the 300-level or higher (only one may be a writing course). English 348 is required for certification in secondary teaching. (4 units)
  • The nine units used to fulfill major requirements must be taken for a numerical grade and may include a directed study only with special permission.

Requirements for Major with Creative Writing Emphasis

  • Nine units in English, including
    • 205 (1 unit)
    • One unit of the following: 321, 322 (1 unit)
    • One unit of the following: 378, 379 (1 unit)
    • One additional writing course from 203, 206, 207, 223, 275, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 321, 322, 378, 379 (Note: 203 is required for students in secondary education) (1 unit)
    • One unit of the following: 151 or 152, 253, 255, 257, 258, 261 (1 unit)
    • Four additional literature courses including at least two at the 300-level or higher and at least one focusing on the twentieth century (340, 341, 342, 358, or 360). (4 units)
  • The nine units used to fulfill major requirements must be taken for a numerical grade and may include a directed study only with special permission.

Requirements for Major with Professional Writing Emphasis

  • Nine units, including
    • 203, 208 (2 units)
    • One of the following: 206, 207, 223 (1 unit)
    • Any two of the following: 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, or Communication Studies 306 or 365 (2 units)
    • Two English courses that satisfy the textual analysis mode requirement. (2 units)
    • Two additional English literature courses, at least one at the 300-level or above. (2 units)
  • The nine units used to fulfill major requirements must be taken for a numerical grade and may include a directed study only with special permission.

Requirements for Minor in English

This minor is constructed to accommodate any literature emphasis, whether broadly or specifically defined. The minor can provide a general overview, or it can be tailored to provide a specific focus as a complement for majors in history, American political thought, art history, or other fields.

  • Five units in English, including
    • 203 (1 unit)
    • Plus any two of the following: 151 or 152, 253, 255, 256, 257, 258, 261 (2 units)
    • Two at the 300-level or higher (excluding writing courses). (2 units)
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

Requirements for Major or Minor with Education Certification

  • Elementary English Language Arts Major—Eight units in English, including
    • Any three units of the following: 151 or 152, 253, 255, 257, 258, 261 (3 units)
    • Three units in literature, all of which must be at the 300-level or higher (3 units)
    • 203 and one unit of elective in writing or literature at the 200-level or higher, except 348, which are also required as part of the Elementary Education Planned Program. (2 units)
  • Secondary Major—Major course requirements same as for the English major, except that English 348 must be included in the four 300-level courses.
  • Secondary Minor—Five units in English, including
    • Any two units of the following 151 or 152, 253, 255, 256, 257, 258, 261 (2 units)
    • One unit of the following 203, 205, 206, 207, 223, 275, 307, 308, 321, 322 (1 unit)
    • Two units at the 300-level or higher, including 348 and one literature course. (2 units)
  • The five units must be taken for a numerical grade and may include a directed study only with special permission.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

English Courses

Writing and Language

100 Writing Essentials (1)
An introduction to the basics of college writing, with special attention to word and sentence fundamentals. Emphasizes generating ideas for writing, imagining words that match ideas, and learning/practicing writing (and revising) grammatically and structurally sound papers, in a variety of styles and genres. Must be taken for a numerical grade. (Not counted toward the major.) Hendrix, Christensen, Staff.

101 English Composition (1)
An introduction to the idea and practice of college writing. Emphasizes writing as process, with close attention to generation of ideas, clarity of expression at the sentence level, organization and logic of argumentation, conventions of academic discourse, and strategies for revision. (Not counted toward the major.) Staff.

101H Honors Composition (1)
An honors level version of English 101 for students with superior writing skills. Admission by placement only. (Not counted toward the major.) Staff.

125 English for Academic Purposes I (1/2)
An introduction to the expectations specific to course work at an American college. Emphasizes the development of improved English grammar, academic vocabulary, reading comprehension and analytical writing while providing necessary cultural background. Enrollment by placement only. Staff.

127 English for Academic Purposes II (1/2)
An advanced course in the use of English in the American academic setting, with emphasis on the skills and techniques needed to excel in the English 101 (and above) classroom. Enrollment by placement only. Staff.

203 Advanced Expository Writing (1)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above and one of the following: completion of English 101 or 101H with a grade of 2.0 or better, recommendation of student’s instructor in English 100, placement during SOAR or advanced placement in English. Required of students obtaining elementary teacher certification.
Advanced study of and practice in expository writing beyond the 101-level, with emphasis on writing for specific audiences, techniques of argumentation, stylistic choices available to writers, and increased sophistication in thought and expression. Christensen, Lockyer, MacInnes.

205 Introductory Creative Writing (1)
Prerequisite: Completion of English 101 or 101H with a grade of 2.0 or better, recommendation of student’s instructor in English 100, advanced placement in English or permission of instructor.
A study in the craft of both poetry and fiction, including imagery, lyricism, character development, form, plot, and style. Students write and revise their own poems and short stories. Reading in and discussion of contemporary literature as well as critiques of fellow writers’ work. Brown, Mesa.

206 Writing in Place (1)
Prerequisite: English 101 or permission of instructor.
An experiential study of environmental writing, with a focus on place, nature, and the relationship between humans and their environments. Students write in a variety of genres and modes, including exposition and creative non-fiction. Christensen.

207 Multimedia Journalism (1)
Prerequisite: Completion of English 101 or 101H with a grade of 2.0 or better, recommendation of student's instructor in English 100, advanced placement in English or permission of instructor.
An introduction to reporting, writing, filming, and editing for print and online media, including discussion of media law and ethics, AP style, and magazine writing. Preparation for internships. Prerequisite for all advanced journalism courses. Deutsch.

208 Professional Writing (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above and one of the following: completion of English 101 or 101H with a grade of 2.0 or better, recommendation of student's instructor in English 100, placement during SOAR or advanced placement in English.
An introduction to the practice of workplace and technical writing, including design and visual argument. Emphasizes the analysis of a variety of professional rhetorical situations and the production of appropriate texts in response. Staff.

209 Responding to Student Writing: Consulting Theory and Practice (1/2)
Prerequisite: English 101, 101H or equivalent writing and learning experience.
Introduction to the theory and practice of writing consulting, for individual or small group consulting in writing centers and professional settings. Includes study and writing in multiple genres (e.g., autobiography, journal, ethnography, academic research). Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Hendrix.

223 Introduction to Writing Creative Nonfiction (1)
Prerequisite: English 101.
A study of creative nonfiction in its various forms. Discussion of the ways in which writing creative nonfiction (memoirs, personal essays, etc.) differs from journalistic writing and the ways in which it employs lyrical and fiction-writing techniques. Students will write and revise their own creative nonfiction (minimum 30 pages). Requires written critiques of fellow writers' work and extensive reading in and writing about contemporary creative nonfiction. Brown, Mesa.

275 Screenwriting Fundamentals (1)
Prerequisite: English 101.
An intensive study of feature-film screenplay format and structure, including a workshop of student step outlines, treatments, and screenplays. In the first part of the semester, students are assigned exercises addressing specific screenwriting issues, including character, setting, dialogue, and subtext, and read and analyze already-produced screenplays. In the second part, students write and revise a short (minimum 30-minute) script. Brown.

306 Magazine Writing (1)
Examines the history and significance of magazines in the United States, from the explosion of lifestyle magazines in the late nineteenth century to current issues in magazine publishing. Writing assignments focus on producing publishable magazine articles. Deutsch.

308 Advanced Multimedia Journalism (1)
Prerequisite: English 207 or permission of instructor.
An advanced media workshop with assignments including investigative reporting, specialized coverage, long-form articles, multimedia packages, and short video documentaries. Deutsch.

309, 310 Multimedia Editing I (1/2, 1)
Prerequisites: English 207, 308 or permission of instructor.
An advanced workshop for student journalists. Includes reporting, writing, and shooting for the Albion College Pleiad, the award-winning, student-run campus news source. Deutsch.

311, 312 Multimedia Editing II (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: English 309 or 310.
An even more advanced workshop for student journalists. Includes reporting, writing, and shooting for the Albion College Pleiad, the award-winning, student-run campus news source. Deutsch.

313 Magazine Editing (1)
An advanced workshop for magazine development, writing, and editing that ends with the publication of a new magazine. Deutsch.

321 Advanced Creative Writing (Poetry) (1)
Prerequisite: English 205 or permission of instructor.
A workshop for continued study and practice in writing poetry. Students examine form in free verse and traditional verse (the lyric, blank verse, sonnets, etc.); write new poems, including a series of formal exercises; and extensively revise their own poetry. Students also write critiques of fellow writers’ work and read contemporary poetry. Mesa.

322 Advanced Creative Writing (Fiction) (1)
Prerequisite: English 205 or permission of instructor.
A workshop for continued study and practice in writing fiction, with special emphasis on narrative design. In addition to producing 50 new pages of fiction, students substantially revise their work, and write and revise several short-short stories. This course also requires written critiques of fellow writers’ work and extensive reading in and writing about contemporary fiction. Brown.

348 English Language (1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
History, structure and usage of the oral and written English language. Required of students obtaining elementary teacher certification. Hendrix, Staff.

356 Visual Poetry (1)
A study of writing poetry and its presentation in printed form. Intended for writers and visual artists alike, this course teaches the fundamentals of writing poetry and letterpress printing. Participants both write their own poems and, using movable type and hand-operated printing presses, set and print their own poems as broadsides and artists’ books. Same as Art 356. McCauley, Mesa.

378 Creative Writing Workshop (Fiction) (1)
Prerequisite: English 322 or permission of instructor.
A workshop for advanced fiction writers. Students write one long short story (minimum 30 pages) in addition to meeting individual goals set in consultation with the instructor, for a total of at least 60 pages over the course of the semester. In addition, students extensively revise their work, read several short-story collections and/or novels, and familiarize themselves with literary journals. This course may also require written critiques of fellow writers’ work and presentations of published stories. Brown.

379 Creative Writing Workshop (Poetry) (1)
Prerequisite: English 321.
A workshop for advanced poets. Writers further develop their own style and interests, workshop poems, produce a poetry sequence, and complete a polished portfolio. Discussion includes fellow writers’ poems, current trends in poetry, and a more nuanced conversation of poetic forms and devices. Poems will be submitted for publication. Mesa.

Literature Courses

151 Introduction to the Study of Literature (1)
An introduction to strategies for the close reading of texts and for the development of informed written analysis. Readings are drawn from a variety of genres. Staff.

152 Literature Matters (1)
Addresses the question of literature’s relevance and the practice of reading critically, purposefully, and pleasurably. Staff.

211 Latina/o Literature (1)
A survey of contemporary poetry and prose by Chicana/o, Cuban-American, Dominican-American, and Puerto Rican-American authors. Discussion topics include the construction of a “Latina/o” identity and questions of immigration, the homeland, gender, and class, as well as the role of language and storytelling within acculturation. Authors typically include Alvarez, Díaz, Espada, and Garcia. Mesa.

220 The Making of Modern Masculinities: British Literature and Manliness, 1660-1914 (1)
Traces the development of modern beliefs about appropriate male behavior as constructed and reflected by British literature from the Restoration of the monarchy to the eve of the Great War. Readings include fiction, poetry, essays, children's books, life-writing, and some extra-literary texts like conduct books and visual texts. Also examines how these ideas about masculinity connect to other important social forces of the period, such as the rise of capitalism, the cult of domesticity, and the swell of the British empire. Staff.

234 African American Literature (1)
A survey of African-American literature from the eighteenth century until the present day. Authors typically include Phyllis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison. Lockyer, Roberts.

238 Terrorists and Treehuggers (1)
An interdisciplinary study of the past, present, and future of environmental radicalism. Typical authors include Rachel Carson, Edward Abbey, Paul Watson, and Wangari Maathai. Christensen.

243 Women and Literature (1)
A study of the fiction, poetry and nonfiction written by British and American women. Texts are selected to represent diverse, historically-positioned perspectives and artistic techniques. Lockyer.

246 Immigration in Literature (1)
The representation of immigration and immigrant life in North America, especially in texts written by people who are themselves immigrants or the children of immigrants. Topics considered include working class experience, the psychic upheaval caused by drastic relocation, the special tensions that arise between children and parents as life is made in a new world, and the formation of ethnic/racial identity through contact with those already resident in North America. Collar.

248 Children's Literature (1)
A study of children’s literature. Texts include picture books as well as chapter books from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Course focuses on literary analysis rather than pedagogy. Roberts.

253 British Literature, 900-1660 (1)
A survey of representative works of English literature from Beowulf to Paradise Lost. Authors typically include Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Sidney, Donne, Wroth, Philips, and Milton. MacInnes, Staff.

255 British Literature, 1660-1900 (1)
A survey of representative works of English literature from the seventeenth to the late nineteenth century. Authors typically include Dryden, Swift, Montagu, Pope, Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Tennyson, Hopkins, and Wilde. (English 253 is not a prerequisite.) Miller.

256 British Literature, 1900-present (1)
Representative works of British literature from the twentieth century to the present. Authors typically include Joseph Conrad, W. B. Yeats, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, W. H. Auden, Samuel Beckett, Stevie Smith, Zadie Smith, and others. Collar.

257 American Literature, 1600-1860 (1)
A survey of American literature from the early seventeenth century to the beginning of the Civil War. Authors typically include John Smith, John Winthrop, Mary Rowlandson, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Walt Whitman. Lockyer, Roberts.

258 American Literature, 1860-present (1)
A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Authors typically include Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Charlotte Gilmore Perkins, Henry James, Wallace Stevens, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Flannery O’Connor, and Toni Morrison. (English 257 is not a prerequisite.) Lockyer, Roberts.

261 Greek and Roman Literature (1)
A survey of classical writers in translation, including Homer, the tragic dramatists, Virgil, and others. Discussion topics include the cultural contexts of ancient literature (Greek religion, the Athenian polis, Roman imperialism, etc.) and the role of “the classics” in constructions of a western European “tradition.” MacInnes.

285 Gay and Lesbian Literature (1)
Examines lesbian and gay literature written in Great Britain and America from the Renaissance through the twentieth century, including works by Shakespeare, Byron, Whitman, Melville, Dickinson, Wilde, Cather, Woolf, Baldwin, and Lorde. Considers such questions as: What makes a text "gay''? How does the cultural oppression of homosexuals shape the literary texts they produce? Do these works form any sort of literary tradition and, if so, how do they build on and influence each other? What is their place in the larger literary canon? Staff.

330 The Novel and the New (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
Traces the development of the novel in England from the beginnings in the late seventeenth century up through the Romantic period. Considers the novel's origins in genres like travel narratives, spiritual autobiography, romance tales, criminal biographies, and personal letters. Also considers the effect of historical and cultural factors like criminal law, the slave trade, gender roles, the rise of capitalism, and the literary marketplace on the novel. Authors read include Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Radcliffe, Austen, and Bronte. Miller.

331 British Fiction After 1850 (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
A study of the British novel from the time of Dickens to the present. Staff.

337 Victorian Sexualities (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An exploration of how Victorians wrote and thought about sexuality and gender. Authors typically include Tennyson, Rossetti, Carroll, Collins, Stevenson, Wilde, and Gissing. Discussions address such topics as Victorian marriage, “fallen women,” imperial desire, sexual violence, and homosexuality. Miller.

338 Eighteenth-Century Culture Shocks (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An examination of the categories of race, class and gender in eighteenth-century Britain and its colonies, emphasizing writing by people of color, working-class writers, and women. Included are literary works by well-known writers (Behn, Defoe, Swift, Austen, etc.) and by less canonical ones. Extra-literary works are also considered (travel narratives, economic tracts, conduct books, etc.). Staff.

339 The British Romantics (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
Studies in the Romantic Period (from 1789 to roughly 1830) in Britain. Involves considerable study of the works of the major six poets of the period (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats) as well as many other writers increasingly gaining scholarly attention (including Mary Wollstonecraft, Dorothy Wordsworth, Thomas de Quincey, Mary Shelley, John Clare, and Felicia Hemans). Examines the Romantic questioning of traditional notions about God, sex, the imagination, the family, the rights of women and of the working classes, the natural world, science, slavery, and aesthetics. Miller.

340 The Twentieth Century in English Literature (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An examination of ideas surrounding nation, national literature, citizen and political standing, family, anti-colonialism, and post-colonialism. Although some important non-literary documents are considered, the selected texts are principally literary and include works by such writers as Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Chinua Achebe, Virginia Woolf, Zadie Smith, Pat Barker, Anita Desai, and Michael Ondaatje. Collar.

341 Contemporary Literature (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing higher or permission of instructor.
A study of British and American writers whose major work has been done since 1945. Collar.

342 Modern Poetry (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing higher or permission of instructor.
A study of the major modern poets: Eliot, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, and others. Collar.

344 The Age of Elizabeth (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An exploration of Elizabethan literature in its literary and cultural context. Examines the ways in which writers deployed poetry, prose, and drama in the service of political ambition, literary aspiration, and religious sentiment, as well as erotic desire. The broad goal is to use these literary expressions to discuss the ways that subjectivity in the Renaissance rested uneasily on distinctions between self-assertion and narcissism, soul and body, health and disease. Particular attention is given to ways in which poetic expression contributes to the gendering of subjectivity. MacInnes.

345 Redeeming Eve: Renaissance Women's Writing (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An introduction to Renaissance women's studies and to literature written by English women in the early modern period (1500-1700). The readings combine literature and non-fiction of the period with modern critical works on women in the Renaissance. Examines the ways in which authorship was defined in the period and the ways such definitions either excluded or restricted female authors. Particular attention is given to larger issues of Renaissance studies such as the status and role of women, the gendering of subjectivity, and the relationship between gender and sexuality. MacInnes.

346 Voices of Liberty: Milton and the Seventeenth Century (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
England in the seventeenth century was a country torn apart by deep divisions, political, social, and religious. From this turmoil, from civil war and political revolution, arose a host of new ideas and new ways of seeing the world. This course explores the poetry and prose of this period, with special emphasis on John Milton and Paradise Lost. Discussions range from cavalier love poetry to grand topics such as good and evil, free will, and divine Providence. MacInnes.

347 The Age of Satire (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
Studies the satirical literature of the eighteenth century, including works by Dryden, Rochester, Finch, Pope, Swift, Montagu, Fielding, Gay, Hogarth, Johnson, and Austen. Examines the goals and qualities of satire. In considering why this period is so prone to satire, the course examines social and historical factors such as the rise of capitalism, changing gender roles, contests over class status, the spectacle of capital punishment, the new literary marketplace, and the ideal of companionate marriage. Staff.

350 The American Novel (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An examination of the novel as both a traditional and experimental genre in American letters. Texts include Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! and between five and seven additional novels selected to provide students with varied opportunities to do advanced work in American literary studies. Lockyer.

351 Four American Poets (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
A study of four twentieth- or twenty-first-century American poets and advanced work in critical approaches to writing about poetry. Recent poets include Robert Frost, Muriel Rukeyser, Natasha Tretheway, Wallace Stevens, and William Carlos Williams. Focus is on whole collections. Lockyer.

352 Literature of the American Civil War (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An examination of the literature of the American Civil War, broadly conceived. Texts include fiction and poetry, political documents and slave narratives. Discussions address the relationship between history and literature, print culture, and the human experience of war, among other things. Roberts.

353 Medieval Drama (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
Introduces students to a lively and important body of English medieval drama beginning with tenth-century dramatic representations of biblical narrative in the liturgy and carrying through to sixteenth-century humanist drama from the English schools. Emphasizes reading the works as texts intended to be dramatized or performed and includes the production and performance of a short work. Study of the means of production and dissemination of the texts helps students understand manuscript culture and the position of medieval drama in its wider European aesthetic and dramatic context. Staff.

354 Idea of Nature, Nature of Ideas (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the relationship between the imagination and the natural world in the works of key American writers. Draws on the creative and critical tools of multiple disciplines—including literary studies, creative writing, and natural history. Typical authors include H.D. Thoreau, Annie Dillard, James Galvin, Bernd Heinrich, and Mary Oliver. Christensen.

355 Chaucer (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
A comprehensive study of the works of Geoffrey Chaucer with emphasis on the minor poems, the dream visions, and the Canterbury Tales. Examines the dissemination of works of medieval literature, manuscript production, the early printing of Chaucer's works, and the changing nature of Chaucer criticism through successive centuries. Staff.

358 Literature of the Great Lakes (1)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
A bioregional exploration of representative poems, novels, and essays written by Great Lakes authors. Typical authors include Richard Powers, Bonnie Jo Campbell, Lorine Niedecker, James Wright, Joseph Boyden, and Holling Clancy Holling. Christensen.

360 The Problem of Race in American Literature (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An examination of a number of continuing problems expressed in American poetry, fiction, drama, and essays by white and black writers from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Writers include Larsen, Baldwin, Ellison, Beatty, Senna, O’Connor, and McCullers. Lockyer.

361 Whitman and Dickinson in Context (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
An examination of two of the most important and decidedly different poets ever to have lived and written in the United States. Considers Whitman and Dickinson in relation to one another and within a number of contexts that shaped the composition and reception of their work—nineteenth-century poetry and poetics, the American Civil War, the expanding and evolving print culture, and the early and late twentieth-century conceptions of nineteenth-century American poetry. Roberts.

363 Literary Theory (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
A study of key theoretical concepts (like "intention'' and "discourse'') and theoretical orientations (for example, new criticism, deconstruction, feminist criticism, and the new historicism). Assignments range from applying a theoretical approach to developing a response to a theoretical question. Collar.

370 Medieval Romance: The Non-Arthurian Tradition (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
Examines selected non-Arthurian romances and challenges the validity of stereotypical views of the genre. Also considers how chivalric tropes influence gender relations today. Readings include chivalric conduct books, poetry, and historical works from late medieval France and England. Staff.

374 Theater and Society in Early Modern England (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
Examines the drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in its theatrical, social, and political contexts. Staff.

375 Shakespeare I (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
A study of Shakespeare’s plays before 1600, including at least two tragedies, five comedies, and four history plays. The plays are examined individually as particular theatrical events in their own context and in subsequent ages, and conditions of production in Shakespeare’s theater are considered. Major attention is given to the representation of gender in the plays, and other topics include the history of critical response, the variety of theoretical approaches currently available, and the many political and social agendas which the plays may have been made to serve. Same as Theatre 375. MacInnes.

376 Shakespeare II (1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
A study of Shakespeare’s plays after 1600, with special attention to the major tragedies: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. The plays are examined individually, but attention is also given to social and political contexts. Major attention is given to the representation of gender in the plays, and other topics include the history of critical response, the variety of theoretical approaches currently available, and the many uses to which the plays have been put. (English 375 is not a prerequisite.) Same as Theatre 376. MacInnes.

Special Studies

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not inlcuded in other courses. Staff.

391, 392, 394 Internship (1/2, 1, 2)
Opportunities in journalism, editing, publishing, and other fields. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or permission of instructor.
Advanced study of selected writers, and/or literary genres. Examples of recent seminars include Three Irish Poets, Fiction of Cormack McCarthy, and The American Renaissance. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. (Permission of department required to be counted toward the major.)
Usually taken in preparation for the honors thesis. Staff.

Admission to Albion

Application for First-Year Admission

Admission to Albion College is selective and based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials, personal qualifications, and potential for success at the College. Albion admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, creed or national origin.

The Admission Committee reviews applications on an individual basis, paying particular attention to the unique qualities each candidate possesses. The committee considers the following factors in evaluating an applicant's credentials: rigor of curriculum pursued, grades, co-curricular involvement in high school, community and religious activities, letters of recommendation received, and results of the ACT or SAT college admission tests.

Candidates for admission are expected to graduate from an accredited high school or preparatory school and have at least 15 units of academic credit in the following subjects: English, mathematics, social science, science and foreign language. Albion College also welcomes students who have been home schooled or who have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). In both cases, students should contact the director of admission to develop a process to review non-traditional academic experiences and competencies.

Students may submit an application for admission at any time after August 1. Normally, however, students apply after October of their senior year in high school. In order to receive equal consideration for admission and financial aid, students should apply and have all required credentials on file by February 15 of their senior year.

Students who submit an online application are not charged a fee. Albion has its own application and also accepts the Common Application.

Applicants seeking fall admission must pay a $350 enrollment deposit to the College postmarked no later than May 1 to secure their place in the fall class.

Applicants seeking spring admission should submit their $350 deposit before January 10.

Early Action

Albion welcomes students to apply early to secure a place in the fall class, and to ensure full consideration for academic and special talent scholarships. Students who apply by November 1 or December 1 will be notified of an admission decision by January 15. The early action process is non-binding. All students who apply after December 1 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be notified of an admission decision beginning February 1 until the class is filled.

Entrance Tests

Standardized entrance tests (ACT or SAT) are required. High school students should sit for the ACT or SAT exam no later than February of their senior year. Albion College's code number is 1007 for the SAT and 1956 for the ACT. Information about the SAT may be obtained from the College Board at www.collegeboard.org. Information about the ACT may be obtained at www.act.org.

Campus Visit

A visit to the campus and a personal interview are highly recommended. As a service to campus visitors, guided tours of the campus are provided. The admission staff will also arrange visits with faculty members or with specific academic departments.

The Admission Office is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It is also open on select Saturdays during the academic year.

Specific information pertaining to the curriculum, the faculty or admission to Albion College may be obtained from:

Albion College
Office of Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, Michigan 49224
Telephone: 800/858-6770
E-mail:
Web: http://www.albion.edu

Advanced Placement and CLEP

Albion College is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Under this program, a high school student who earns a grade of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement Examination automatically receives college credit and may receive advanced placement in the area of his or her proficiency.

Some College departments also participate in the College-Level Subject Examination Program (CLEP) of CEEB. Albion College permits students to obtain a maximum of eight units of credit toward the bachelor of arts, and to fulfill core and/or major requirements through CLEP. Students should contact the Registrar's Office for information on which departments accept CLEP credit.

Maximum Credit Available Through Examination—No more than eight units of credit can be obtained through any combination of locally designed departmental examinations and the College-Level Examination Program. No more than 12 units of credit can be obtained through any combination of the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and the College-Level Examination Program.

Immediate Sophomore Standing—An entering student who presents six or more units obtained through the Advanced Placement Examination, locally designed departmental examinations, and/or the College-Level Examination Program will obtain immediate sophomore standing.

Special Admissions

Transfer Students

Each year Albion accepts students who have attended other colleges or universities. It is recommended that candidates possess at least a 3.0 grade point average for consideration. It is expected that the applicant will be in good academic and social standing at the college last attended and that the previous college record has been strong enough to compare favorably with students already in attendance at Albion. Students are responsible for submitting, with their application, official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, along with an academic and social status supplement completed by the appropriate official from each institution previously attended.

Students with an official transcript marked "MACRAO approved" for an associate of arts (A.A.) degree from a Michigan community or junior college are exempt from taking the First-Year Seminar and the Modes of Inquiry requirement, and they may be admitted at the junior level. However, the following graduation requirements must be met: the category requirements and the writing competence requirement. A maximum of 16 units (64 semester hours) may be transferred from accredited junior colleges.

Candidates who transfer from an accredited four-year college must complete no less than the last 12 units (48 semester hours) in residence at Albion. These students must also complete all degree requirements including the category requirements and the writing competence requirement.

For more specific details regarding Albion's unit system and required course grades, refer to the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

International Students

To be considered for admission to Albion, an international student must complete the admission procedures including the following:

  • Common Application for International Students.
  • Statement of Financial Support for International Students with supporting documents, i.e., bank statements, income/salary statements of parents or sponsors from their employers, and a financial support letter.
  • Personal statement/essay (one page minimum).
  • Original or certified copies of all academic records, secondary school transcripts, and college/university transcripts, translated into English and listing individual courses including types, number, and grades received. A minimum of at least three years of records will be required for students applying from four-year secondary institutions and a minimum of two years for students applying from three-year secondary institutions. In most cases, transfer students from colleges/universities outside the United States seeking admission to Albion College will require an external evaluation by World Education Services (WES) and Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) for transfer of college credits. Collegiate credits can be transferred at any time after the semester ends but will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the Albion College registrar.
  • Official scores of TOEFL, IELTS, ACT, SAT or ELS course 112 completion sent directly to Albion College from educational testing services. Albion College will also allow certified copies stamped by a school counselor or administrator.
  • Two letters of reference from the guidance counselor or headmaster, English teacher (or teacher of choice for English-speaking nations) or a community member from a club or service organization with which the student is affiliated.

To ensure enough time to obtain a student visa, we advise students to complete the application package and send it to Albion College by February 1 for fall admission, October 1 for spring admission, or December 1 for early action. Late applications will be reviewed if space allows. Once Albion College has received the application materials, an admission decision is made within four weeks.

Financial Aid—International students should consider an Albion education an investment the student, family and sponsors are willing to make. Few colleges and universities in the United States provide financial support to international students. International students often receive scholarships to Albion College, although our policies limit the maximum award for international students to 50 percent of the total cost of attendance.

Students who demonstrate the highest academic potential and bring significant co-curricular interests to our campus will receive the greatest consideration for these awards. In awarding scholarships, Albion College also considers an applicant's financial need upon review of the application, as well as other requirements.

Notification of a scholarship is made at the time of admission, and will be noted in the acceptance letter.

For further information about international student admission requirements, please contact:

Office of Admission
Albion College
c/o International Student Admission
611 E. Porter St.
Albion, MI 49224
U.S.A.

International Baccalaureate—The College recognizes the strength and rigor of the International Baccalaureate Program. Students will receive one unit (four semester hours) of credit for IB courses/tests taken at the highest level with a score of 5 or more.

Other Candidates

Veterans—Veterans returning from military service and other eligible military personnel are admitted to Albion College under the training provisions established by the Veterans Administration. The College may allow credit for military service activities which have educational content to students who present acceptable military records. Such credentials should be submitted as part of the admission materials. Details about veteran's benefits under the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008 are available online.

ConApp—Albion College is a participating college in the United States Army Concurrent Application Program (ConApp) and welcomes applications from prospective students who wish to continue their education after active duty military service. Interested students should contact the Albion College Admissions Office or their Army recruiter for information on the ConApp program and related veteran's benefits for higher education. Albion guarantees admission to qualified ConApp applicants after military service.

Auditors—A non-degree student may enroll as an official auditor. This obligates a student to attend classes and complete course requirements (papers, laboratory assignments, tests, and a final examination). The course appears on the transcript and the grade is posted, but no degree credit is earned.

Guest Students—To be admitted as a guest student at Albion College students must complete the Michigan Undergraduate Guest Application. All guest students must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Guest students assume responsibility for determining whether the course they take at Albion will apply to their program of study.

Financial Aid

Albion College offers need-based financial aid in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and student employment. Sources of funds include Albion College scholarships, grants and work; private sources; and State of Michigan and federal grant, loan and work programs administered by the College. To apply for need-based financial aid, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA may be completed online at www.fafsa.gov. The Albion College Student Financial Services Office will develop a financial aid package based on the FAFSA information. The package may include a combination of grants, scholarships, loans and work. Students have the option of accepting all or part of the aid awarded. Albion College also offers a number of academic scholarships to incoming students. Students who qualify for an academic scholarship receive notification from the Admission Office.

While we do everything we can to assist students with financial need, it is important to remember that, at Albion, we believe the primary responsibility for financing your education lies with you and your family. In awarding need-based aid, the College requires that each student and his/her parent(s) contribute funds toward the cost of the education.

Information about loans, scholarships and work opportunities may be secured by contacting Albion's Student Financial Services Office. Entering first-year students applying for financial aid are urged to make their requests by filing the FAFSA by February 15 of their senior year. The deadline for the State of Michigan scholarship/grant program is March 1. For maximum consideration, Albion academic scholarship applications must be received by February 15.

Need-Based Aid Renewal

You must reapply annually for need-based financial aid. Based on available funding, aid usually continues at the same level each year, unless there is a change in your financial situation.

Satisfactory Progress Policy

The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by Congress in 1980 and reauthorized in 1992, mandates that institutions of higher education maintain minimum standards of "satisfactory progress" in order for students to receive financial aid. Albion College makes these standards applicable to all need-based institutional awards, Federal Pell Grants, federal campus-based programs, Federal Direct Loans, Federal PLUS Loans and State of Michigan awards in order to maintain a consistent policy for all students receiving assistance. To satisfy satisfactory progress requirements, a student must maintain a minimum G.P.A. each semester, complete a required number of units each year and complete degree requirements within a determined number of semesters. An Albion College student is eligible for the equivalent of eight full-time semesters of financial aid. Students enrolled in the teacher certification program or the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) program may be required to attend one additional semester. These students will be given nine semesters of aid in which to receive their degree/certificates. Students who do not complete their degree in eight semesters (or nine for teacher certification or B.F.A.) may not be eligible for additional financial aid.

A full-time student is one who is enrolled for at least 3.0 units each semester. A half-time student is one who is enrolled for at least 1.5 units per semester. Students carrying fewer than 1.5 units will be considered a quarter-time student. Semesters in which the student is enrolled exclusively for a one-unit internship, or summer semesters in which the student is enrolled for one unit, do not count toward the maximum semester limitation as indicated above. Other part-time semesters will be equated to full-time semesters. Students planning to enroll part-time should notify the Student Financial Services Office.

All full-time semesters for which the student is enrolled in the College are counted in the eight-semester limitation (nine semesters for teacher certification or B.F.A.) even if no financial aid was received. Semesters in which the student enrolled and attended any classes will count in semesters attended, including semesters in which a student withdraws or takes a leave of absence.

Grade point average (G.P.A.) and units completed are reviewed for satisfactory academic progress at the end of the spring semester. Students must maintain the following cumulative average and units completed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester at Albion College;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester at Albion;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester at Albion;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester at Albion;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester at Albion;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester at Albion;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester at Albion;

In addition, regardless of the cumulative grade point average, a student who fails to obtain a minimum 2.0 G.P.A. for three consecutive semesters is not considered to be making satisfactory academic progress for aid renewal.

Transfer Students--Class standing of transfer students will be considered according to units transferred in. For example, a student who is deemed to have first-semester sophomore class standing upon entrance will be eligible for six semesters of Albion College financial aid.

Notification--The Student Financial Services Office will notify any student qualifying for financial assistance who does not meet minimum satisfactory progress and is being terminated from aid. Following the spring semester, notices will be sent electronically to the student's Albion e-mail account and any other e-mail on record with the registrar, and such notices will be considered delivered.

Regaining Eligibility--A student who has insufficient units to qualify for aid may be considered eligible for aid only when enough units, including incomplete courses, have been completed to make up the unit shortage. Unit credit may be transferred in, but G.P.A. will be affected only by courses taken at Albion College. The academic year will be considered to commence with the first day of classes of the fall semester and continue to the first day of classes the following fall, thus allowing the possibility of reinstatement of aid eligibility over the summer term. If a student had mitigating circumstances that prohibited him/her from meeting the standards, the student may submit an appeal. Appeals must be made in writing to the Student Financial Services Office, and they will be reviewed by the Appeals Committee prior to the start of the semester in which reinstatement of financial aid eligibility is requested. Examples of mitigating circumstances include: illness, change of major, unexpected hardships and death in the immediate family.

Academic Withdrawal--See the Academic Regulations section of this catalog for academic status and withdrawal information.

Albion College Academic Scholarship Renewal

Academic scholarships are renewable annually provided students maintain the required yearly grade-point average and are in good personal standing with the College.

Scholarship recipients are expected to maintain superior academic performance while at Albion College. To renew a Distinguished Albion Scholar award, a Trustee Scholarship or a Presidential Scholarship, a student must maintain an annual grade point average of 3.00. To renew a Webster Scholarship or a Briton Award, a student must maintain an annual grade point average of 2.50. Recipients of a Heritage Award must meet the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards outlined above.

Grade point averages and units earned are reviewed at the end of the academic year by the Student Financial Services Office. A student's first year of college is often the most challenging. Therefore, students are encouraged to seek the advice of their faculty adviser while making decisions regarding their class schedule. Eligibility to retain an academic award will require the annual G.P.A. or a written plan of action from the faculty adviser regarding the issues surrounding a student's G.P.A.

Student Employment

Campus employment is available to help students meet expenses. The Federal Work-Study program is available for students who show financial need, based on analysis of the FAFSA. In addition to on-campus Work-Study positions, there are positions available off-campus in the community of Albion that are funded through the Federal Work-Study program. Students who are not eligible for the Federal Work-Study program may receive an Albion work award. Earnings from student employment are paid directly to the student by payroll check each month; the amount earned is not credited to the student's account.

The Student Employment Office has a listing of on- and off-campus jobs that are available for everyone (Work-Study and non-Work-Study students). Jobs are also listed online at www.albion.edu/studentemployment. This listing includes job description, qualifications needed and rate of pay.

International Scholarships and Fellowships

Information on prestigious national and international scholarships and fellowships is in the Academic Programs section under Academic Honors and Awards.

Trustees

Effective for the 2015-16 board year.

Kevin F. Asher, partner assurance services, Ernst and Young, LLP, San Jose, California (2016 T).

Joseph S. Calvaruso, executive director, Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2016 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney (retired), Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., Okemos, Michigan (2016 A). *Chair of the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, First United Methodist Church, Kalamazoo, Michigan (2016 WM).

Mauri A. Ditzler, president, Albion College, Albion, Michigan.

Mae Ola Dunklin, director (retired), Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development, Albion College, Albion, Michigan (2018 T).

Faith E. Fowler, executive director, Cass Community Social Services, Detroit, MI (2016 D).

Douglas R. Goering, professor of art, emeritus, Albion College, Flint, Michigan (2018 T).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2017 A).

Michael J. Harrington, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana (2018 T). *Chair of the Committee for Institutional Advancement.

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Suttons Bay, Michigan (2018 T). *Chair of the Audit and Compliance Committee.

Deborah L. Kiesey, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (2018).

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2017 T). *Chair of the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman (retired), Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., McLean, Virginia (2016 T). *Chair of the Committee for Enrollment and Marketing.

Jeffrey A. Ott, attorney, Warner Norcross & Judd, LLP, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2018 T).

Jeffrey C. Petherick, portfolio manager, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2017 T).

Lawrence B. Schook, vice president for research, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois (2018 T). *Chair of the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Johanna B. Schulte, ’15, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2018 R).

Samuel J. Shaheen, surgeon, Saginaw, Michigan (2017 T). *Chair of the Committee on Infrastructure.

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2018 T). *Chair of the Board.

Donald W. Strite, ’14, staff auditor, Ernst and Young, Detroit, Michigan (2016 R).

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2017 T).

Dennis W. Wahr, president and CEO, Holaira, Inc., Plymouth, Minnesota (2016 T).

Jeffrey D. Weedman, CEO/CBW, Cintrifuse (retired), Cincinnati, Ohio (2017 T).

James M. Wilson, professor and director, Gene Therapy Program, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2017 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T—elected by the Board of Trustees; A—elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D—elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM—elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R—recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, Palatine, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer (retired), Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, Armonk, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Petoskey, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board, Tucson, Arizona.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Florence, Wisconsin.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Stowe, Vermont.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Byron Center, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Administration

These lists are current as of July 1, 2015.

Office of the President

Mauri A. Ditzler, president; B.S., 1975, Wabash College; Ph.D., 1979, Duke University.

Jeanne M. Bachus, executive secretary to the president; B.S., 1982, Eastern Michigan University.

Office of Academic Affairs

Marc M. Roy, provost; B.A., 1982, Lawrence University; Ph.D., 1989, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Delores A. Duff, assistant to the provost; B.A., 2009, Albion College.

Erik A. Achenbach, associate registrar; B.A., 1992, M.A. 2001, Western Michigan University.

Cheryl M. Blackwell, bibliographic instruction/reference librarian; B.S., 1980, Wayne State University; M.I.L.S., 1987, University of Michigan.

David B. Carey, chemical hygiene officer, Chemistry Department; B.S., 1980, Western Michigan University.

Amber M. Cook, theatre technical director; B.A., 2002, University of Michigan-Flint; M.F.A., 2010, Michigan State University.

Anne M. Cox, coordinator, Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management; B.A.A., 1985, Central Michigan University.

Guy M. Cox, director, Ferguson Center for Technology-Aided Learning and Teaching; B.A., 1978, University of California, Santa Cruz; M.A., 1984, Ph.D. candidate, University of California, Berkeley.

Stephen L. Detwiler, technician, Geological Sciences Department; B.A., 2014, Albion College.

Claudia A. Diaz, co-director of libraries; B.A., 1976, College of William and Mary; A.M.L.S., 1984, University of Michigan.

Laurel L. Draudt, associate director, Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management; B.A., 1997, Marietta College; M.A., 2006, Ohio State University.

Andrew M. Dunham, associate dean for academic affairs and registrar; B.A., 1986, San Jose State University; M.M.E., 1990, Ph.D., 2000, University of Northern Colorado.

Amy N. Everhart, coordinator, Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service; B.A., 2008, Albion College.

David J. Green, director, Whitehouse Nature Center; B.A., 1989, Bluffton University.

Robert D. Harris, technician, Geological Sciences and Physics Departments; B.S., 1971, Michigan State University; M.S., 1972, Michigan Technological University.

Kurt C. Hellman, technician, Biology Department; B.S., 1988, University of Michigan; M.S., 1991, Eastern Michigan University.

Scott A. Hendrix, director, Academic Skills Center, and director of writing; B.A., 1983, Oregon State University; M.F.A., 1987, University of Oregon; Ph.D., 1999, University of Kansas.

Dawn J. Hernandez, assistant director, Career and Internship Center; B.A., 1990, Albion College; M.A., 1998, Wayne State University.

Karen S. Hoaglin, liaison, Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development; B.A., 1993, Hope College; M.A., 1997, Western Michigan University.

F. Troy Kase, director, Career and Internship Center; B.B.A., 1992, M.A., 1997, Idaho State University.

Renee M. Kreger, coordinator, Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program.

Megan M. O’Neill Kudzia, Web services and emerging technologies librarian; B.A., 2008, Kalamazoo College; M.S., 2009, Wayne State University.

Nicholas J. Laban, accompanist, Music Department; B.A., 2011, Albion College; M.M., 2013, Western Michigan University.

Laura C. Loman, advisor, Institute for Healthcare Professions; B.S., 2007, Salisbury University.

Rebecca M. Markovich, library circulation services coordinator; B.A., 1998, Spring Arbor University.

Karla R. McCavit, director, Quantitative Skills Center; B.S., 1993, Adrian College; M.S., 1995, Michigan State University.

Patrick A. McLean, director, Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service; B.A., 1985, University of Dayton; M.A., 1987, Miami University (Ohio).

Marion F. Meilaender, library serials coordinator; B.A., 1975, Northwestern University; M.A., 1977, Ph.D., 1979, Princeton University.

Alice W. Moore, document access librarian; B.A., 1973, Albion College; M.I.L.S., 1988, University of Michigan.

Jason M. Moritz, education certification officer; B.A., 1992, Northwestern University; M.A., 1998, University of Iowa; M.L.I.S., 2002, University of California, Los Angeles.

Nicholas M. Mourning, coordinator, Learning Support Services; B.A., 2005, Albion College; M.A., 2014, Eastern Michigan University.

Thomas J. Perry, events manager, Music Department; B.M., 2009, Eastern Michigan University; M.M., 2011, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Debra L. Peterson, director, Center for International Education; B.A., 1974, Juniata College; M.P.S., 1990, Cornell University; Ph.D., 2003, Michigan State University.

Jenny Risner-Wade, operations manager, Career and Internship Center; B.A., 1998, Albion College.

Pamela M. Schwartz, director, Learning Support Services; B.A., 1970, University of Michigan; M.S., 1972, Purdue University; Ph.D., 1978, University of Michigan.

Bobbie J. Van Eck, assistant registrar; B.S., 1978, Albion College; M.A., 1988, Western Michigan University.

Michael A. Van Houten, co-director of libraries; B.S., 1975, Central Michigan University; A.M.L.S., 1978, University of Michigan.

Edward J. Visco, associate director, Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service; B.A., 2004, Albion College; M.Ed., 2006, Chestnut Hill College.

Starr E. Weaver, coordinator, Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity; A.S., 1990, Lansing Community College; A.S., 1998, Washtenaw Community College; B.A., 2002, Eastern Michigan University.

Douglas W. White, associate director, Center for Sustainability and the Environment; B.S., 1976, Pennsylvania State University; M.S., 1978, University of Tennessee; Ph.D., 1989, Rutgers University.

John W. Woell, associate provost; B.A., 1993, Valparaiso University; M.A., 1995, Vanderbilt University; M.A., 2000, Ph.D., 2002, Claremont Graduate University.

Barry L. Wolf, director, First-Year Experience Student Mentor Program; director, Academic Success Program; B.A., 1998, University of Michigan; M.A., 2001, Psy.D., 2005, Georgia School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University.

Athletic Department

Matthew R. Arend, director of athletics; B.S., 1998, M.A., 2000, Western Michigan University.

Kayla M. Baker, assistant athletic trainer, B.A., 2011, Albion College; M.A., 2013, Illinois State University.

Dustin A. Beurer, assistant football coach; B.A., 2005, Albion College; M.A., 2007, Morehead State University.

Gerald K. Block, men's soccer coach; B.A., 1995, DePauw University; M.E., 2000, Springfield College.

Doreen A. Carden, head women's basketball coach; B.S., 1995, Oakland University.

Scott J. Carden, head baseball coach; equipment manager; B.A., 1998, Bowling Green State University.

Lance C. Coleman, head men’s and women's track and field coach; B.A., 1991, Albion College.

Jacob N. DeCola, head men's lacrosse coach; B.F.A., 1995, University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth; M.F.A., 1998, University of Utah.

Kristin M. de St. Aubin, head volleyball coach; B.A., 2007, Albion College; M.A. candidate, Western Michigan University.

Timothy N. Dunford, director of tennis; B.A., 2005, Shenandoah University.

Katie C. Elder, assistant women's basketball coach; B.A., 2008, Albion College.

Leigh Ann LaFave, head softball coach; B.A., 2005, Alma College; M.A., 2007, Minnesota State University; M.B.A., 2010, Ellis University.

Andrew T. Lawrence, head athletic trainer; B.A., 2008, Michigan State University; M.A., 2010, Western Michigan University.

Robert T. Lee, director of sports information; B.S., 1992, Ohio University; M.A., 1994, Ohio State University.

Shanta R. Loecker, head women's lacrosse coach; B.A., 2006, University of California, Los Angeles.

Jody R. May, head men's basketball coach; B.A., 1993, Ohio Northern University; M.A., 1995, Bowling Green State University.

Jordan F. McArleton, head men's and women's golf coach; B.A., 2003, Albion College.

Gregory W. Polnasek, associate athletic director, compliance; assistant football coach; B.A., 1979, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire; M.A., 1980, Ohio State University; M.Ed., 1981, Bowling Green State University.

Craig S. Rundle, head football coach; B.A., 1974, Albion College; M.A., 1977, Central Michigan University.

Eric P. Scott, head women's soccer coach; B.A., 2001, Albion College, M.A., 2004, Wayne State University.

Jacob G. Taber, head men's and women's swimming coach; B.A., 2004, Hope College; M.A., 2009, Western Michigan University.

Michael C. Thomas, assistant men's basketball coach; B.A., 2006, Albion College.

Michael L. VanderHeyden, director, Dow Center; B.S., 2005, Ball State University; M.A., 2007, Indiana State University.

Melissa A. Walton, senior associate athletic director and senior women's administrator; B.A., 1996, Olivet College; M.A., 1998, Central Michigan University.

Stephen A. Wasil, assistant football coach/defensive coordinator; B.A., 2005, Albion College.

Office of Enrollment

Steven J. Klein, vice president for enrollment management; B.S., 1977, Cornell University;  M.S., 1980, Indiana University.

Amanda L. Zienert, administrative assistant for enrollment management.

Amanda M. Dubiel, director of admission; B.A., 1995, Western Michigan University.

Ann A. Whitmer, director of student financial services; B.A., 1986, M.S., 1992, Michigan State University.

Lukman Arsalan, assistant director of admission and international coordinator; B.S., 2007, University of Jordan; M.A., 2009, University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Joshua W. de St. Aubin, admission counselor; B.S., 2008, Northern Michigan University

Darci A. Dakin, associate director of student financial services; B.A., 1995, Albion College.

Heather A. Fuchs, associate director of admission; B.A., 2005, Western Michigan University; M.A., 2013, Michigan State University.

Marcus L. Gill, assistant director of admission and multicultural coordinator; B.A., 2004, Albion College; M.A., 2009, Siena Heights University.

Corey R. Grazul, admission counselor; B.A., 2008, Albion College; M.B.A., 2012, Spring Arbor University.

Trevor L. Markovich, admission counselor; B.A., 2009, Adrian College.

Lloyd J. McPartlin, associate director of admission; B.S., 1996, Central Michigan University.

Kristin A. Padilla, associate director of admission; B.A., 2006, University of Northern Colorado.

Amanda M. Skinner, admission counselor; B.A., 2014, Albion College.

Molly A. Thompson, admission counselor; B.A., 2011, Roosevelt University.

Lars P. Zabel, senior associate director of student financial services; B.A., 1977, Albion College.

Office of Finance and Administration

Jerry L. White, vice president for finance and administration; B.A., 1989, Anderson University; C.P.A., 1994; M.S., 2005, Purdue University.

Catherine G. DeFazio, administrative assistant to the vice president for finance and administration, business office and auxiliary services; A.S., 1981, Fisher College.

Preston M. Arquette, programmer analyst; B.A., 2015, Albion College.

Edward N. Bachle, database and applications administrator; B.A., 2013, Albion College.

Eric W. Beadle, director of systems and networking; B.S., 1987, DeVry Institute of Technology.

Scott J. Boulanger, audiovisual and technology specialist.

Michael F. Brinkman, instructional technologist; B.A., 2003, B.S., 1995, Michigan State University.

Bradly T. Brouwer, systems administrator.

Robin R. Brubaker, director of instructional technology and media services; A.A.,  A.G.S., 2009, Kellogg Community College; B.A., 2011, Spring Arbor University; M.S.M., 2013, Spring Arbor University.

G. Alan Bruce, programmer/analyst; A.A., 1991, Baker College.

Edward J. Cheladyn, programmer/analyst; B.S., 2014, Lake Superior State University.

Susan L. Clark, purchasing manager.

Michael K. Dever, chief information officer; B.S., 1973, University of Michigan.

Prudie K. DeWaters, office manager, Information Technology.

Timothy J. DeWitt, business manager; B.S., 1981, Central Michigan University.

Amanda M. Ewers, senior finance analyst; A.B., 2009, Lansing Community College; B.B.A., 2011, Siena Heights University.

Mark C. Frever, director of grounds; B.A., 1991, Michigan State University; CSFM (Certified Sportsfield Manager).

Dawn M. Green, payroll supervisor.

Jesse D. Gyger, systems and networking technician.

Mark S. Holbrook, controller; B.A., 1986, Michigan State University.

Ralph H. Houghton, senior instructional technologist; A.A., 1987, Community College of the Air Force; B.S., 1973, University of Tampa; M.S.C.I.S., 1986, Boston University.

Kurt Juday, audio visual specialist; A.S., 2009, B.S., 2010, Full Sail University.

Angela N. Konkle, payroll/human resources assistant.

Mitchell R. Kyser, network administrator.

Pamela A. Levay, network administrator; B.S., 1987, Indiana Institute of Technology.

Lisa A. Locke, director of human resources and Title IX coordinator; B.S., 1988, Aquinas College; M.A., 1991, Central Michigan University.

Shahid S. Malik, network security administrator; A.A.S., 2007, Washtenaw Community College.

Donald E. Masternak, director of facilities operations and management; B.S., 1980, University of Michigan.

William D. McCoy, director of maintenance and energy management.

Kimberly J. Mercer, accounting supervisor.

Linda M. Neal, human resources coordinator.

John R. Okerman, facilities supervisor.

Ruth L. Reese, staff accountant; A.A., 2002, B.B.A., 2006, M.B.A., 2010, Baker College.

Laura K. Ward-McDowell, campus services supervisor; B.A., 1992, Albion College.

Rebecca Williams, help desk coordinator.

Kellie D. Williamson, office manager, facilities.

Office of Institutional Advancement

Robert A. Anderson, vice president for institutional advancement; B.A., 1980, Oakland University.

Linda K. Ohmer, administrative assistant to the vice president for institutional advancement.

Marie L. Ames, director of development; A.A., 2009, Kellogg Community College; B.A., 2011, Albion College.

Kimberly F. Arndts, assistant director of donor relations and stewardship; B.A., 1984, Albion College.

Colin J. Carr, assistant director of development for leadership annual giving; B.A., 2012, Albion College.

Maria D. Carr, associate director of annual giving; B.A., 2009, Michigan State University.

Emma A. Chervinsky, assistant director of college events; B.A., 2011, Michigan State University.

Anna B. Coulter, senior director of advancement operations; B.A., 1988, University of Chicago.

Sandra E. Covington, assistant director of prospect research and management; B.A., 1980, Michigan State University; M.S.W., 1991, Rutgers University.

Erica L. Eash, assistant director of marketing communications; B.A., 2006, M.S., 2007, Grand Valley State University.

Katherine M. Hibbs, director of art and design; B.F.A., 1991, Grand Valley State University.

David M. Lawrence, associate director of digital media strategy; B.A., 2003, Adrian College.

Gerica A. Lee, assistant director of annual giving; B.A., 2011, Smith College.

Elinor M. Marsh, director of alumni engagement; B.A., 1992, Hanover College, M.A., 1996, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Mark S. Neisler, director of development; B.A., 1994, Albion College;  M.P.A., 2012, Eastern Michigan University.

John F. Perney, senior director of communications; B.A., 1994, Drake University.

Tamara A. Rummel, director of development; A.A., 1983, Ferris State University; B.S., 1997, Michigan State University.

Gregg A. Strand, director of corporate and foundation relations; B.S., 2003, Humboldt State University.

John M. Thompson, associate vice president for marketing; B.A., 2002, Michigan State University.

Julia "Jake" Weber, communications assistant; B.A., 1988, San Jose State University.

Carly A. Wegner, assistant director of alumni engagement; B.A., 2011, University of Nebraska; M.A., 2012, University of Michigan.

Eric L. Westmoreland, assistant director of web technology; B.A., 2008, M.A., 2010, Saginaw Valley State University.

Shelley J. White-Thomas, director of development; B.A., 1993, Albion College; M.B.A., 1999, University of Phoenix; J.D., 2003, Wayne State University.

Ellen H. Yoakam, assistant director of advancement services; 1978, B.S., Michigan State University.

Office of Student Affairs

Sally J. Walker, vice president for student affairs and dean of students; B.A., 1973, Southwestern University; M.S.Ed., 1976, Indiana University; Ed.D., 1995, Harvard University Graduate School of Education.

Debra S. Crittenden, administrative assistant for student affairs; A.A., 1981, Jackson Community College.

Travis R. Allen, assistant director for campus safety.

Liz A. Andrews, residence hall director; B.A., 2011, M.S., 2013, Western Illinois University.

Barry L. Beilfuss, associate director for campus safety.

Amanda M. Bode, psychologist; B.A., 2010, Calvin College; M.A., 2015, Eastern Michigan University.

Hilary D. Clark, residence director for operations; B.A., 2013, Hope College.

Jonathon R. Collier, associate director for Greek life and student organizations; B.A., 2009, Hanover College; M.A., 2013, Bowling Green State University.

Johnnie R. Collins, senior associate director for campus safety and emergency management coordinator; B.A., 1979, Olivet College.

Michelle L. Croce, psychologist and training director; B.A., 1989, California State University; M.A., 1993, Chapman University; Psy.D., 2013, Union Institute and University.

Christina J. Fritz, residence hall director; B.A., 2012, M.A.Ed., 2015, Western Michigan University.

Kiernan J. Gamel, counselor/certified substance abuse specialist; B.A., 2000, Southern Illinois University.

Karen M. Hiatt, assistant director for Kellogg Center.

Tracey L. Howard, assistant dean of program development; B.A., 1991, Marietta College; M.Ed., 1993, Ohio University.

Franklin A. Kelemen, director for counseling services; B.A., 1974, Beloit College; M.S.W., 1978, University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 1985, Temple University.

Cheryl A. Krause, director for student health services; Diploma in Nursing, 1978, Henry Ford Hospital School; board certified in college health nursing, 2005; B.S.N., 2011, Robert B. Miller College.

Julie A. McMahon, director for residential life; B.A., 1993, Central Michigan University; M.S., 1995, Murray State University.

Daniel J. McQuown, college chaplain and director for global diversity; B.A., 1992, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; M.Div., 1996, Princeton Theological Seminary.

Jennifer A. Schreer, director for campus programs and organizations and associate director for Anna Howard Shaw Women's Center; B.A., 1994, M.A., 1997, Siena Heights College.

Pamela A. Schuler, assistant director for service and leadership; B.S., 1973, Northern Michigan University.

Connie L. Smith, associate dean of students; B.A., 1986, Baldwin-Wallace College; M.A., Ed., 1990, Michigan State University.

Kenneth E. Snyder, associate dean of students and director for campus safety; B.A., 1986, Aquinas College.

Susan L. Solis, assistant director for student health services; B.A., 1979, Albion College; A.S.N., 2002, Kellogg Community College.

Melissa M. Sommers, medical assistant; C.E.N.A., 2014.

Jill H. Wasserman, certified substance abuse specialist; B.A., 2009, Albion College; M.A,  2013, Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

Keena S. Williams, assistant director for global diversity; B.A., 2009, Albion College.

Ryan D. Woods, assistant director for campus safety.

Vicky L. Wright, assistant dean of students; B.A., 2002, Aquinas College; M.A.Ed., 2005, University of Akron; M.P.O.D., 2010, Case Western Reserve University.

Staff Emeriti

Bernard T. Lomas, president emeritus; A.B., 1946, Albion College; B.D., 1948, Oberlin Graduate School of Theology; D.D., 1965, Albion College. On staff 1970-1983. Emeritus since 1983.

Melvin L. Vulgamore, president emeritus; B.A., 1957, Ohio Wesleyan University; B.D., 1960, Harvard University; Ph.D., 1963, Boston University. On staff 1983-1997. Emeritus since 1997.

Peter T. Mitchell, president emeritus; B.A., 1967, Albion College; M.A., 1968, University of Michigan; Ed.S., 1972, Indiana University; Ed.D., 1981, Northeastern University. On staff 1997-2007. Emeritus since 2007.

Frank Bonta, dean of admissions, emeritus; A.B., 1949, Albion College; M.A., 1966, Ed.S., 1970, Michigan State University; LL.D., Albion College, 1982. On staff 1951-1995. Emeritus since 1995.

Sarah F. Briggs, associate vice president for communications; B.A., 1974, Ohio Wesleyan University; M.S., 2011, Eastern Michigan University. On staff 1978-2015. Emerita since 2015.

Katharine L. Padgett, director of career planning and placement, emerita; B.S., 1950, Juniata College; M.A., 1970, Ph.D., 1978, University of Michigan. On staff 1975-1991. Emerita since 1991.

Faculty

Additional information on the following faculty members is given with the academic department. This is the faculty list as of January 2015. Faculty who are not holding an appointment at Albion for 2015-16 are indicated with an asterisk.

Abbott, David W., professor of music
Albertson, Roger, associate professor of biology
Anderson, Paul L., professor of mathematics and computer science

Baker, Vicki L., associate professor of economics and management
Balke, Maureen, chair and professor of music
Ball, James S., professor of music
Bartels, William S., professor of geological sciences
Bedient, John B., associate professor of economics and management
Betz, Heather M., assistant professor of kinesiology
Bieler, Craig R., professor of chemistry
Biermeier-Hanson, Benjamin J., visiting assistant professor of psychological science*
Bollman, Mark E., chair and associate professor of mathematics and computer science
Boyan, Andrew C., assistant professor of communication studies
Brown, Danit, associate professor of English

Carlson, John M., assistant professor of economics and management
Carpenter, Craig W., instructor of economics and management*
Chase, Bradley A., assistant professor of anthropology and sociology
Christensen, Nels A., associate professor of English
Christopher, Andrew N., professor of psychological science
Chytilo, Lynne, professor of art
Cocks, Geoffrey C., professor of history
Collar, Mary L., professor of English
Coston, Bethany M., visiting assistant professor of anthropology and sociology

Dabney, Dyron K., assistant professor of political science
Davidson, James W., visiting assistant professor of physics*
Deutsch, Glenn J., visiting assistant professor of English
Dick, Wesley A., professor of history
Dixon, Michael J., associate professor of art

Elischberger, Holger B., chair and associate professor of psychological science
Erlandson, Karen T., chair and associate professor of communication studies

Feagin, Ashley R., visiting assistant professor of art and art history
Fink, Nadiya, assistant professor of mathematics and computer science*
Francis, Andrea P., visiting assistant professor of psychological science
Franzen, Trisha, professor of women's and gender studies
French, Andrew N., professor of chemistry

Grossman, Andrew D., professor of political science
Guenin-Lelle, Dianne P., chair and professor of modern languages and cultures

Hagerman, Christopher A., associate professor of history and associate director of the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program*
Harnish, Allison D., assistant professor of anthropology and sociology
Harris, Clifford E., chair and professor of chemistry
Hein, Nichole D., visiting assistant professor of chemistry*
Henke, Suellyn M., associate professor of education
Hill, Megan R., visiting assistant professor of communication studies
Hill, Eric D., assistant professor of psychological science
Hill, Holly M., visiting instructor of kinesiology
Hoffland, Mark E., staff lecturer in theatre
Hooks, Jon A., chair and professor of economics and management

Jechura, Tammy J., associate professor of psychological science
Jensen-Abbott, Lia M., staff lecturer in music
Jordan, Sarah E., associate professor of English*

Kanter, Deborah E., professor of history
Kennedy, E. Dale, professor of biology and director of the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Keyes, Barbara J., professor of psychological science and director of the Institute for Healthcare Professions
Kirby, Jeremy S., associate professor of philosophy

Lewis, Lisa B., professor of chemistry
Li, Zhen, associate professor of economics and management
Lincoln, Beth Z., professor of geological sciences and interim provost
Lincoln, Timothy N., chair and professor of geological sciences and director of the Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Lockyer, Judith A., professor of English
Lyons-Sobaski, Sheila A., associate professor of biology

MacInnes, Ian F., chair and professor of English and director of the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity
Madhok, Bindu, chair and professor of philosophy
Mason, Darren E., professor of mathematics and computer science
McCaffrey, Vanessa P., associate professor of chemistry
McCauley, Anne M., chair and professor of art
McIlhagga, Samuel D., chair and associate professor of music
McRivette, Michael W., assistant professor of geological sciences
McWhirter, Jocelyn, chair and associate professor of religious studies
Melzer, Scott A., chair and associate professor of anthropology and sociology
Menold, Carrie A., associate professor of geological sciences
Mesa, Helena G., associate professor of English and director of the ethnic studies program
Metz, Kevin M., associate professor of chemistry
Miller, Aaron J., associate professor of physics
Mittag, Daniel M., assistant professor of philosophy
Moreau, Charles E., chair and associate professor of physics
Moss, Carol P., staff lecturer in kinesiology
Moss, Robert I., chair and professor of kinesiology
Mourad, Ronney B., professor of religious studies
Myers, Perry W., associate professor of modern languages and cultures

Nakfoor, Joy L., visiting instructor of economics and management*
Noble, Marcie A., staff lecturer in modern languages and cultures

Olapade, Ola A., associate professor of biology
Oswald, Kalen R., associate professor of modern languages and cultures

Parr, Clayton G., associate professor of music
Pérez Abreu, Catalina, assistant professor of modern languages and cultures*

Qian, Yuxia, assistant professor of communication studies*
Quinney, Dominick N., visiting assistant professor of ethnic studies

Rabquer, Bradley J., assistant professor of biology
Reimann, David A., professor of mathematics and computer science
Roberts, Jessica F., associate professor of English
Rohlman, Christopher E., associate professor of chemistry
Rose, William D., chair and associate professor of political science

Sacks, Marcy S., chair and professor of history
Saltzman, Gregory M., professor of economics and management
Saville, Kenneth J., chair and professor of biology
Schmitter, Ruth E., professor of biology and chair of women's and gender studies program
Seely, David G., professor of physics
Shanton, Kyle D., chair and associate professor of education
Skean, James D., Jr., professor of biology
Starko, Robert J., chair and assistant professor of theatre

Valdina, Peter M., assistant professor of religious studies
Verduzco-Baker, Lynn M., assistant professor of anthropology and sociology

Walling, Carrie B., assistant professor of political science
Walther, Andrea C., visiting assistant professor of biology
Wickre, Bille, professor of art history
Wieth, Mareike B., associate professor of psychological science
Wilch, Thomas I., professor of geological sciences
Wilson, W. Jeffrey, professor of psychological science

Yewah, Emmanuel T., professor of modern languages and cultures and chair of the international studies program
Yoshii, Midori, associate professor of international studies

Zellner, Nicolle E.B., associate professor of physics

Faculty Emeriti

This list is current as of July 1, 2015.

Robert L. Armstrong, professor of chemistry, emeritus.
B.S., 1961, Heidelberg College; M.S., 1963, Ohio State University; Ph.D., 1966, Michigan State University. On staff 1974-2001. Emeritus since 2001.

Ingeborg Baumgartner, professor of modern languages and cultures, emerita.
A.B., 1958, University of Michigan; M.A., 1959, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 1970, University of Michigan. On staff 1966-2001. Emerita since 2001.

Betty Beese, professor of physical education, emerita.
B.S., 1947, Purdue University; M.S., 1950, Wellesley College. On staff 1951-1985. Emerita since 1985.

Leonard G. Berkey, professor of anthropology and sociology, emeritus.
B.A., 1969, Colgate University; M.A., 1975, Ph.D., 1982, Michigan State University, On staff 1978-2012. Emeritus since 2012.

Marian D. Bishop, catalog librarian, emerita.
B.S., 1943, Eastern Michigan University; B.A., 1962, Michigan State University; M.S.L., 1971, Western Michigan University. On staff 1971-1988. Emerita since 1988.

Albert G. Bolitho, professor of music, emeritus.
B.M., 1950, M.M., 1952, Wayne State University; Ph.D., 1968, Michigan State University. On staff 1967-1994. Emeritus since 1994.

Jeffrey C. Carrier, professor of biology, emeritus.
B.S., 1971, M.S., 1973, Ph.D., 1974, University of Miami. On staff 1979-2010. Emeritus since 2010.

Russell G. Clark, Jr., professor of geological sciences, emeritus.
B.A., 1966, Amherst College; M.S., 1968, Michigan State University; Ph.D., 1972, Dartmouth College. On staff 1973-2006. Emeritus since 2006.

H. Eugene Cline, professor of philosophy, emeritus.
B.R.E., 1969, Baptist College; M.A., 1977, Ph.D., 1980, Michigan State University. On Staff 1979-2010. Emeritus since 2010.

James W. Cook, professor of English, emeritus.
B.A., 1954, Wayne State University; M.A., 1955, University of Michigan; Ph.D., 1964, Wayne State University. On staff 1962-2000. Emeritus since 2000.

E. Scott Cracraft, associate professor of economics and management, emeritus.
B.B.A., 1960, M.S., University of Mississippi; C.P.A., 1968. On staff 1977-1997. Emeritus since 1997.

John W. Crump, professor of chemistry, emeritus.
A.A., 1951, Santa Rosa Junior College; B.A., 1953, University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., 1957, University of Illinois. On staff 1962-1997. Emeritus since 1997.

Ralph M. Davis, professor of philosophy, emeritus.
A.B., 1958, Stanford University; Ph.D., 1967, University of Oregon. On staff 1967-2005. Emeritus since 2005.

Dean G. Dillery, professor of biology, emeritus.
B.S., 1952, M.S., 1955, Ph.D., 1961, Ohio State University. On staff 1960-1994. Emeritus since 1994.

Robert E. Dininny, professor of chemistry, emeritus.
B.S., 1954, Allegheny College; M.S., 1956, Ph.D., 1959, Western Reserve. On staff 1962-1995. Emeritus since 1995.

Thomas Doran, professor of music, emeritus.
B.M., 1957, M.M., 1959, D.M., 1967, Northwestern University. On staff 1962-2000. Emeritus since 2000.

David G. Egnatuk, professor of physical education, emeritus.
A.B., 1971, Albion College; M.S., 1974, University of Southern California; M.S., 1978, Eastern Michigan University. On staff 1975-2010. Emeritus since 2010.

Ronald C. Fryxell, professor of mathematics, emeritus.
B.A., 1960, Augustana College; M.A., 1962, Ph.D., 1964, Washington State University. On staff 1964-2002. Emeritus since 2002.

Carolyn J. Gaswick, periodicals and government documents librarian, emerita.
B.A., 1964, Nebraska Wesleyan University; M.L.S., 1972, Western Michigan University. On staff 1984-2006. Emerita since 2006.

Dennis C. Gaswick, professor of chemistry, emeritus.
A.B., 1964, Nebraska Wesleyan University; Ph.D., 1968, Oregon State University. On staff 1969-2005. Emeritus since 2005.

William R.B. Gillham, professor of religious studies, emeritus.
A.B., 1955, Washington University; B.D., 1958, Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., 1964, Princeton University. On staff 1961-2001. Emeritus since 2001.

Douglas Goering, professor of art, emeritus.
B.F.A., 1974, M.F.A., 1976, University of Michigan. On staff 1986-2008. Emeritus since 2008.

William N. Hayes, professor of psychology, emeritus.
B.A., 1956, University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 1961, Princeton University. On staff 1973-2000. Emeritus since 2000.

Nancy G. Held, professor and director of the Education Program, emerita.
B.S.E., 1954, M.S.E., 1955, Drake University. On staff 1961-1992. Emerita since 1992.

David K. Hogberg, professor of psychology, emeritus.
B.A., 1959, Alma College; M.S., 1961, Lehigh University; Ph.D., 1968, State University of New York, Buffalo. On staff 1966-1999. Emeritus since 1999.

Allen H. Horstman, professor of history, emeritus.
B.S., 1965, Purdue University; LL.B., 1968, Harvard University; M.A., 1973, Ph.D., 1977, University of California, Berkeley. On staff 1977-2005. Emeritus since 2005.

John P. Hostetler, professor of psychology, emeritus.
B.S., 1960, M.S., 1963, Ph.D., 1964, Purdue University. On staff 1964-1999. Emeritus since 1999.

Thomas R. Johnson, associate professor of physical education, emeritus.
B.S., 1971, Illinois State University; M.A., 1990, 1992, Western Michigan University; Ph.D., 1996 Walden University. Emeritus since 2011.

Frank L. Joranko, professor of physical education, emeritus.
A.B., 1952, Albion College; M.S., 1953, University of Illinois. On staff 1973-1995. Emeritus since 1995.

Sarah Jordan, professor of English, emerita.
B.A., 1980, Salem College; Ph.D., 1994, Brandeis University. Emerita since 2015.

David W. Kammer, professor of physics, emeritus.
B.S., 1960, M.S., 1963, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 1967, Washington State University. On staff 1967-1999. Emeritus since 1999.

John P. Kondelik, director of libraries, emeritus.
B.A., 1964, University of Florida; M.L.S., 1966, Florida State University; Ph.D., 1993, University of Michigan. On staff 1993-2010. Emeritus since 2010.

Sheila I. Kragness, professor of modern languages, emerita.
B.S., 1938, M.A., 1939, Ph.D., 1948, University of Minnesota. On staff 1950-1980. Emerita since 1980.

G. Robina Quale Leach, professor of history, emerita.
B.A., 1952, M.A., 1953, Ph.D., 1957, University of Michigan. On staff 1957-1992. Emerita since 1992.

Paul Loukides, professor of English, emeritus.
B.A., 1961, University of Pittsburgh; M.A., 1963, University of Iowa. On staff 1962-1999. Emeritus since 1999.

Martin A. Ludington, professor of physics, emeritus.
A.B., 1964, Albion College; M.S., 1965, Ph.D., 1969, University of Michigan. On staff 1969-2005. Emeritus since 2005.

Frank J. Machek, professor of art, emeritus.
B.F.A., 1964, Illinois Wesleyan University; M.F.A., 1966, Cranbrook Academy of Art. On staff 1967-2004. Emeritus since 2004.

Philip L. Mason, professor of music, emeritus.
B.Mus., 1955, Western Michigan University; M.M., 1961, D.M.A., 1969, University of Michigan. On staff 1962-1994. Emeritus since 1994.

James F. McCarley, professor of economics and management, emeritus.
B.S., 1960, Bowling Green University; M.A., 1962, Ph.D., 1970, Michigan State University. On staff 1965-2006. Emeritus since 2006.

Robert A. Messer, associate professor of mathematics and computer science, emeritus.
B.S., 1971, University of Chicago; Ph.D., 1975, University of Wisconsin. On staff 1981-2007. Emeritus since 2007.

Eugene E. Miller, professor of English, emeritus.
B.A., 1955, University of Notre Dame; M.A., 1962, Ohio University; Ph.D., 1967, University of Illinois. On staff 1967-1995. Emeritus since 1995.

Richard D. Mortensen, professor of biology, emeritus.
B.S., 1961, Bates College; M.S., 1963, Ph.D., 1967, Purdue University. On staff 1967-2002. Emeritus since 2002.

Max E. Noordhoorn, professor of modern languages and cultures, emeritus.
A.B., 1961, M.A., 1963, Ph.D., 1971, University of Michigan. On staff 1968-2002. Emeritus since 2002.

Martha R. O'Kennon, professor of mathematics and computer science, emerita.
B.A., 1961, University of Richmond; M.S. in mathematics, 1970, M.S. in computer engineering, 1981, Ph.D., 1973, Clarkson University. On staff 1985-2004. Emerita since 2004.

J. Thomas Oosting, professor of theatre, emeritus.
B.A., 1963, Hope College; M.A., 1964, Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., 1970, University of Iowa. On staff 1970-2003. Emeritus since 2003.

Gaylord N. Smith, professor of economics and management, emeritus.
B.B.A., 1966, University of Michigan; M.B.A., 1967, Michigan State University; C.P.A., 1975. On staff 1976-2010. Emeritus since 2010.

Daniel M. Steffenson, professor of chemistry, emeritus.
A.B., 1962, Cornell College; M.A., 1964, Ph.D., 1967, Harvard University. On staff 1967-2008. Emeritus since 2008.

Larry Steinhauer, professor of economics and management, emeritus.
B.A., 1965, City College of New York; M.A., 1967, Ph.D., 1974, University of Chicago. On staff 1974-2006. Emeritus since 2006.

Johan H. Stohl, professor of religious studies, emeritus.
B.Mus., 1955, Eastman School of Music; A.B., 1957, Oberlin College; M. Div., 1961, Andover Newton Theological School; Ph.D., 1972, University of Chicago. On staff 1967-1995. Emeritus since 1995.

Lawrence D. Taylor, professor of geological sciences, emeritus.
B.A., 1954, M.A., 1958, Dartmouth College; Ph.D., 1962, Ohio State University. On staff 1964-1998. Emeritus since 1998.

Michael M. Turner, professor of physical education, emeritus.
A.B., 1969, Albion College; M.Ed., 1970, University of Arizona. On staff 1970-2009. Emeritus since 2009.

Royal A. Ward, professor of theatre, emeritus.
B.A., 1968, MacMurray College; M.A., 1969, University of Illinois; Ph.D., 1984, University of Michigan. On staff 1979-2010. Emeritus since 2010.

Bruce J. Weaver, professor of speech communication, emeritus.
B.A., 1965, Moravian College; M.S., 1966, Kansas State University; Ph.D., 1974, University of Michigan. On staff 1981-2005. Emeritus since 2005.

John A. Wenzel, professor of mathematics and computer science, emeritus.
B.A., 1963, Carleton College; M.A., 1965, Ph.D., 1969, University of Kansas. On staff 1969-2003. Emeritus since 2003.

John A. Williams, professor of physics, emeritus.
A.B., 1959, University of Michigan; Ph.D., 1963, University of California, Berkeley. On staff 1970-2002. Emeritus since 2002.

Timothy H. Williams, professor of physical education, emeritus;
B.A., 1962, Ripon College; M.S., 1972, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse; Ed.D., 1975, University of Northern Colorado. On staff 1975-2002. Emeritus since 2002.

Hal H. Wyss, professor of English, emeritus.
B.A., 1962, Wesleyan University; M.A., 1964, Ph.D., 1971, Ohio State University. On staff 1970-2005. Emeritus since 2005.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

General Academic Regulations

In addition to the aforementioned graduation requirements, Albion College expects each student to meet the following academic regulations:

Grading System

Students are graded according to the following designations:

GradeQuality PointsGradeQuality Points
4.0 4.00 1.7 1.70
3.7 3.70 1.3 1.30
3.3 3.30 1.0 1.00
3.0 3.00 0.0 0.00
2.7 2.70 CR/NC CR/NC
2.3 2.30 I 0.00 (Incomplete)
2.0 2.00

4—represents work outstanding in quality. The student not only shows unusual mastery of the required work for the course, but also has independently sought out and used additional related materials, demonstrating the ability to discover new data, to develop new insights and to bring them to bear on the work at hand.

3—represents work which is higher in quality than that of a 2.0, or more than satisfactory. The student has shown the ability and the initiative to fulfill more than the basic requirements of the course.

2—represents work which fulfills all of the basic requirements for the course. It means that the student has a grasp of the material and techniques or skills sufficient to proceed with more advanced courses in the area.

1—represents work seriously attempted but which is below the 2.0 level in quantity and quality. The student is advised not to continue advanced work in the field.

0—represents work unsatisfactory in either quantity or quality. It results in the student's not being able to continue with further work in the field and results in no credit, although it is recorded on the permanent record.

Note: intermediate grades of 3.7, 3.3, 2.7, 2.3, 1.7 and 1.3 may be awarded.

CR/NC—credit/no-credit. A credit or no-credit grade is given in a course selected for unit credit without quality points. CR is equivalent to a grade of 2.0 or better. The purpose of CR/NC is: (1) to allow students to explore new areas of study outside their majors at no risk to their grade point averages; (2) to provide a method for evaluating academic experience different from usual course work, e.g., internships. Students are limited to one unit of CR/NC per semester except for some internships and off-campus programs, and to no more than eight units in the total of 32 units required for graduation. Students should note that the College is unable to predict how graduate schools and prospective employers will evaluate CR/NC. The CR/NC grading option may only be elected up to the end of the second week of classes each semester. See the academic calendar for exact dates. I—incomplete. Incomplete grades are given only because of illness or other unavoidable circumstances as defined by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. A grade of incomplete must be removed within seven weeks of the end of the term in which the incomplete was given. At the end of the specified time period, the faculty member will assign a grade based on the amount of work satisfactorily completed. The grade of "I" carries no quality points. AU—audit. Students are expected to attend classes, complete all assignments, etc. Students receive a numeric grade but no credit. P—work in progress. This grade is awarded only for directed study and thesis work that requires an extension of time for completion. Students must re-register for the course in their next semester of attendance. Failure to complete the work during this time will result in a grade based on the amount of work satisfactorily completed. The grade of "P" carries no quality points. This grade may also be awarded to students who are enrolled in courses that extend past the end of the semester. Failure to complete the work during the scheduled course time will result in a grade based on the amount of work satisfactorily completed. The grade of "P" carries no quality points.

Grade Reports—Grades are available via the Albion College Information System (ACIS) at mid-semester to first-year students, all students on academic probation and other students performing below a 2.0 in a particular course. Final grades are available via ACIS to all students at the end of each semester. Final grades become a part of the official academic record of each student.

Withdrawal from Courses—A student may withdraw from a course up to and including the Monday of the eleventh week of the semester by turning in to the Registrar's Office a request form bearing the signatures of the student's instructor and adviser. Performance in the course will be recorded on the permanent record as a grade of W. The grade of W does not carry grade point value. This decision may not be reversed if the student later wants to be given a grade.

Course Grade Appeal—Students who wish to appeal the final grade received in a particular course must first consult with the professor of the course in question. Following consultation with the professor, if the student concerns have not been satisfactorily addressed, the student may then consult with the department chair and then finally with the provost.

A final appeal can be made to the Faculty Steering Committee, which will review the steps taken and recommend a solution. If the College is not in session, the chair of the Steering Committee will convene a representative group of faculty to review the grade change appeal.

If a student doubts the wisdom or propriety of personally appealing a final grade, then the student is urged to discuss the matter with his/her faculty adviser, the department chair or a staff member in the Registrar’s Office. As a result of these discussions, an intermediary—either the student’s faculty adviser or another full-time faculty or staff member selected by the student—should evaluate the course grade appeal before acting for the student in pursuing a change of grade.

All final grade changes must be approved by the provost with the advice and consent of the registrar.

Student Classification

Students are classified as follows:

Freshman 0.00 - 5.99 units
Sophomore 6.00 - 13.99 units
Junior 14.00 - 21.49 units
Senior 21.50 or more units

Course Schedules

Repeat Courses—A student taking a course for the first time who receives a final grade of 0.0, 1.0, 1.3, or 1.7 may repeat said course without the permission of the student's advisor or the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. A student wishing to repeat a course more than once may do so only with the permission of the student's advisor and the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Although both original and all repeated grades appear on the permanent academic record, only the most recent grade for the course is included in calculating the grade point average and in meeting graduation requirements. A student may not repeat a course in which the final grade was 2.0 or higher.

A student may not repeat a course in which the final grade was 2.0 or higher. This policy cannot be petitioned.

Repeat course work to improve grades must be taken at Albion; grades from another institution may not be transferred for this purpose.

Course Load—The standard student course load is four units per semester. The minimum student load is three units. Approval from the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions must be obtained if a student wishes to carry less than the minimum course load. A student is eligible for a course load of 4.75 or five units with a cumulative grade point average of 3.3 or greater. A student who wishes to carry an overload and does not meet this eligibility requirement must petition to carry an overload.

Additional tuition and fees apply for a course load above 4.5 units. If, during the first week of classes, a student drops from an overload status, a refund will be made. Following this period, if a student withdraws from a course overload, the course will remain on the student's bill as a billable unit. No refund will be made of any portion of tuition or fees related to the withdrawn course.

Course Schedule Changes (Dropping/Adding a Course)—All schedule changes or dropping or adding of courses must be made and confirmed either via the Albion College Information System (ACIS) or in the Registrar's Office. Changes made from the first day of classes through the first week of classes will be permitted upon application to the Registrar's Office. Normally, no changes may be made after the first week of classes. In exceptional cases it may be to the best interest of the student to adjust his/her program after the first week. Such changes will be recognized only when they have been approved in advance by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. It is the responsibility of the student to petition through the Registrar's Office for any change whatsoever to his/her program. The student is expected to continue with the original class schedule until changes are formally approved.

Class Attendance

Instructors may drop from their courses any student who is registered for the course and not present during the first scheduled meeting. However, students should not assume that they have been dropped from a class if they are not present at the first scheduled meeting. If a student cannot be present at the first class session, he/she must make special arrangements with the instructor prior to the first class meeting in order to maintain a place in the course. Each semester, all students must arrive on campus, complete the final enrollment process, and attend classes no later than the last day to drop and add a course as listed on the College's academic calendar. If circumstances prevent a student from arriving on campus for the first day of classes each semester, the student must notify the Student Affairs Office. A student should always process a drop/add or schedule change form in the Registrar's Office if he/she wishes to drop a course. Furthermore, regular attendance in all classes is expected throughout the semester. Every absence from class is inevitably a loss--usually one which can never be made up. At their discretion, individual instructors may include attendance and class participation as one of the criteria for evaluation of the final grade. Students who are absent from class assume full responsibility for the loss.

Examinations—Students are expected to be present for written examinations at the close of each semester. Students who are absent from a final examination will be allowed to take the omitted examination only if such absence is caused by illness or other unavoidable circumstances approved by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions.

Academic Honesty

Albion College expects its students to take responsibility for their academic endeavors and to accept the consequences. No student should act in a manner that would harm the academic atmosphere of the institution or diminish the experience of any member of the academic community. Strict standards of academic honesty apply to all academic work at Albion College. Students are expected to do their own work. Cheating on examinations or plagiarism is a clear violation of the College's standards and policies. In preparing essays, reports and other projects, any use of the words or ideas of someone else as though they were one's own constitutes plagiarism. Any student found to have violated the College's policy on academic honesty, including cheating and plagiarism, will be subject to penalties in the course and possible disciplinary sanctions, up to and including expulsion from the College. A Judicial Board finding of academic dishonesty may be noted on the student's transcript. A complete explanation of College policy and procedures concerning academic honesty may be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs or viewed online in the Student Handbook.

Special Studies

Seminars—A seminar is usually a small class dealing with a selected topic for each semester. Requirements for enrollment in seminar courses are determined by the individual department.

Directed Studies—A directed study enables a student to do in-depth research on a topic or to carry out a creative project at a level beyond that offered in course work. Directed studies are open only to juniors and seniors and are taken in a department under the numbers 411 or 412, for either one-half or one unit.

To do a directed study, a student must prepare a proposal in writing, which must be endorsed by the proposed faculty supervisor and reviewed by the department chair. The proposal must be filed with the Registrar's Office for credit to be received.

Students doing a directed study must meet with their faculty supervisor weekly for one hour for a directed study. In addition to meeting with their faculty supervisor, students are expected to work a minimum of five hours a week for a one-half unit directed study and 10 hours a week for a one-unit directed study. Faculty and departments are not obligated to offer directed studies.

Directed studies are ordinarily graded credit/no credit. However, under special circumstances, students may request a numerical grade for their directed study with the approval of their faculty supervisor and the department chair. Students who choose the numerical grade option must submit complete grading criteria developed by the faculty supervisor to the Registrar’s Office and should inquire with the department chair about any departmental policies regarding numerical grading of directed studies. Students must request the numerical grade option no later than the end of the second week of classes.

As with other courses, regular feedback from the faculty supervisor throughout the semester on student work is necessary for student learning and the development and completion of an acceptable directed study.

Tutorials—In a tutorial, a student works individually with a faculty member on a course not available to the student in the current semester, but at a comparable level. To do a tutorial, a student must prepare a proposal in writing, which must be endorsed by the proposed faculty supervisor and reviewed by the department chair. The proposal must be filed with the Registrar's Office for credit to be received.

Tutorials are not intended to replace regularly scheduled courses except when there is no other way program requirements can be met. Faculty and/or departments are not obligated to offer tutorials. A regularly scheduled course taken as a tutorial will show the notation ``T'' after the course number on a student's transcript.

Internships and Practica—Internship experiences offer opportunity to participate in, observe and analyze the workings of a firm, agency, or organization. These may be undertaken in a practicum class, or as individual internships, offered by a department under the numbers 391-394. Credit for internship experience varies with the placement from one-half to two units. Normally a student will not undertake an internship until the junior year.

Internships and practica are offered on a credit/no credit basis with not more than four units of credit applying toward the 32 units required for the B.A. or the 34 units required for the B.F.A. degree. This includes internship and practicum experience completed in off-campus programs and at other accredited academic institutions. Unless the internship experience is for an approved off-campus program, a maximum of two units of internship credit may be earned in one semester. All students who apply for an internship or practicum are expected to have a cumulative grade point average of 2.7.

For academic credit, a student must complete the following hours at the internship site during the regular academic period.
One-half unit: 75-149 hours
One unit: 150-300 hours
One and one-half or two units: 301+ hours
For one and one-half or two units of credit, a student is expected to demonstrate a greater breadth and depth of understanding than is possible within the context of a one-half or one unit internship. No more than four units of credit received in connection with internships or practica may apply toward graduation.

Honors

Graduation Recognition—Three grades of recognition are conferred upon graduation from Albion College. For students graduating in 2006 and after, cum laude is granted to those who have a cumulative grade point average of 3.50; magna cum laude is granted to those who have a cumulative grade point average of 3.75; and summa cum laude is granted to those who have a cumulative grade point average of 3.90 or above. Grade point averages are not rounded. A student must complete at least 12 units and three semesters of study at Albion College to be considered for graduation recognition.

Albion College Honors—To graduate “with Albion College honors,” a student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5, have completed all four Great Issues honors seminars, and have completed an acceptable honors thesis and submitted it to the Honors Committee by the required deadline.

Thesis Honors--Qualified students not graduating with Albion College honors may also present papers to be submitted for thesis honors. Normally, such students will have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. A student whose thesis is accepted will graduate “with honors.” Each thesis must be approved by a committee comprising at least three faculty members, and the committee as a whole must be approved by the director of the Brown Honors Program. Qualified students can complete the following kinds of theses “with honors” as specified below:

For a “thesis in ------- major(s),” the thesis adviser and at least one other thesis committee member must be from the department offering the major. For majors that are not housed in departments (e.g., business and organizations, environmental science, environmental studies, public policy, sustainability studies), the thesis adviser can be from any associated department. For majors that are housed in departments with only one faculty member (e.g., ethnic studies, international studies, women’s and gender studies), the other thesis committee members can be from any department. 

For a “thesis in ------- minor(s) or concentration(s),” the thesis adviser and at least one other committee member must be from the department offering the minor or concentration. The other thesis committee members can be from any department. For minors or concentrations that are not housed in departments (e.g., business and organizations, environmental science, environmental studies, public policy, sustainability studies), the thesis adviser can be from any associated department. For minors or concentrations that are housed in departments with only one faculty member (e.g., ethnic studies, international studies, women’s and gender studies), the other thesis committee members can be from any department.  

For a thesis to qualify as an “interdisciplinary thesis,” the thesis adviser and other committee members can be from any department, major, minor, or concentration associated with the topic of the thesis (with at least two departments, majors, minors or concentrations represented on the committee).

Transcripts

Official transcripts are maintained by the Registrar's Office on all academic work attempted at Albion College. Students may request in writing individual copies of their record or request that copies of their record be mailed to other parties. All requests must bear the signature of the student. Transcripts will not be released for students who have past due accounts with the College.

Transfer Credit

Before enrolling at other accredited institutions for academic work to be applied toward the graduation requirements at Albion, students attending Albion College must secure written approval for each course from the registrar, using the Transfer Credit Approval Form. (See also the residence requirements for graduation.) To receive transfer credit, a student must submit an official sealed transcript of the completed course(s) to Albion College. The Registrar's Office will evaluate each course on the following basis: its liberal arts nature, comparability to courses taught at Albion College, and the grade earned. No courses in which the student earned below a 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale) will be considered for transfer credit. One Albion unit equals four semester hours or six quarter hours. Therefore, three semester hours equal three-quarters of a unit, three quarter hours equal one-half of a unit. Any transfer work which the student requests to be considered for his/her major must be approved in writing by the department chair.

Accepted transfer credit is recorded on the student's official Albion College transcript indicating where the work was completed, when the work was completed and the number of Albion units earned. No grades are recorded, and transfer credit is not reflected in a student's grade point average.

Catalog of Entry

Though departmental and graduation requirements of the College may change while a student is enrolled, it is expected that each student will meet the requirements outlined in the catalog that is in effect at the time he or she entered Albion. The "catalog of entry" philosophy is considered applicable for students who leave the College and whose interrupted course of study is not longer than five years.

Graduation Requirements

A student graduates from Albion College after meeting a series of requirements including course work, satisfactory grade point average, a major, residency and others as outlined under specific degree requirements stated below. Students generally graduate after eight semesters.

Bachelor of Arts Degree (B.A.)

The degree of bachelor of arts (B.A.) is conferred upon students who have met all of the following requirements for graduation:

Minimum Units—Students must complete a minimum of 32 units (128 semester hours) of course work to graduate. An Albion unit is equivalent to four semester hours. Included in the total are the core requirement described earlier, courses leading to the major(s) and minor(s), and elective courses which make up one-half to one-third of each student's total courses. There are limits on the number of wellness activity courses, music ensembles and internships that may count toward graduation. Normally students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Grade Point Average—To qualify for the bachelor of arts degree, a student must have a 2.0 grade point average in all course work. A minimum 2.0 grade point average in one major field is also required for graduation. Students should note that to earn the designation of a second major, a 2.0 grade point average also must be achieved in that major. A department also may require additional demonstration of competence (minimum course grade requirements, comprehensive examination, senior recital or the like) to complete a major. Graduating students (2006 and after) earning a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or higher qualify for graduation recognition as described under the Academic Honors and Activities section.

Core Requirement—Graduating students must have completed the core requirement.

Writing Competence Requirement—Students must pass the Writing Competence Examination to graduate.

Majors and Minors—Students must declare at least one major but no more than two majors prior to graduation. Although students may declare a major as early as the freshman year, this is generally done during the sophomore year. Students may fulfill the major requirement in one of three ways: departmental major, interdepartmental major and individually designed major. The maximum number of units required for a departmental major is 10 units in that department and an additional four units in other departments. No more than 16 units in any one department may be counted toward graduation. (A language major in the Foreign Languages Department means that no more than 10 units are required in the specific language declared as the major.) Further information on interdepartmental and departmental majors may be found in the Programs of Study section of this catalog, while the individually designed major is described in the Academics at Albion section. Students also have the option to declare a minor. Further information appears in the Academic Programs section and in the Programs of Study section.

Music Ensembles and Dance—A maximum of two units of credit for participation in music ensembles (instrumental and vocal) or dance studio courses may be applied toward completing the 32 units required for graduation.

Wellness—A maximum of four activity courses (100 level, 1/4 unit) in wellness may be used toward completing the 32 units required for graduation.

Residence Requirement—To be a candidate for an Albion College degree, a student must complete eight of the last 12 units at Albion College. Residence is defined as academic work completed on campus, in combined course programs, approved internships, or through approved off-campus programs.

Application for Degree—Graduating students must file an Application for Degree in the Registrar's Office the year prior to graduation.

Application for Second Degree—If a student who has already earned a baccalaureate degree from a college or university applies to earn a second degree from Albion College, the student will be required to meet the resident requirements for all transfer students.

Participation in Commencement Exercises—Students who have attained at least 25 units may participate in commencement exercises. Students may only participate once.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (B.F.A.)

Bachelor of fine arts students must complete a minimum of 34 units (136 semester hours) of course work to graduate. To qualify for the bachelor of fine arts degree, a student must have a 2.0 grade point average in all course work. Included in this total are the core requirement and at least 16 but not more than 21 units in visual arts. In addition, B.F.A. candidates must fulfill the writing competence requirement and the requirements on grade point average, residence and application for degree described in the preceding section on the bachelor of arts degree.

Students who are within three units of the minimum graduation requirement for the B.F.A. degree may petition for permission to participate in commencement exercises.

For more specific requirements, refer to the Department of Art and Art History section of the catalog.

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music (including up to four 1/4-unit music ensembles), Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

  • Accounting
  • Anthropology
  • Anthropology and Sociology
  • Art (Studio Art)
  • Art History
  • Athletic Training
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Earth Science
  • Economics and Management
  • English
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Exercise Science
  • Finance
  • French
  • Geological Sciences
  • German
  • History
  • Individually Designed Major
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics/Economics
  • Mathematics/Physics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Policy
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Sustainability Studies
  • Theatre
  • Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

  • Anthropology
    • Anthropology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Art
    • Art, Art History
  • Biology
    • Cell and Molecular Biology
    • Environmental Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Economics and Management
    • Accounting—Corporate Track,
    • Economics, Finance, Management
  • Education
    • Educational Studies
  • English
  • Foreign Language
    • French, German,
    • Spanish
  • Gender Studies
  • Geological Sciences
    • Geology, Environmental
    • Geology, Geographic
    • Information Systems,
    • Paleontology
  • History
  • Mathematics
    • Mathematics,
    • Applied Mathematics,
    • Statistics,
    • Computer Science
  • Philosophy
    • Philosophy, History of
    • Philosophy, Philosophy
    • of Mind, Value Theory
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
    • Sociology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Theatre
  • Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

The Core Requirement

At Albion, the general education requirement is referred to as "the core." Students begin to fulfill the core in their first semester with Liberal Arts 101; some will be able to complete much of the core requirement by the end of their first year.

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)
Textual Analysis
Artistic Creation and
Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Historical and Cultural
Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)
Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

Students must also complete a distribution as follows: one unit in fine arts (art and art history, music, theatre, honors), two units in humanities (English, foreign languages, philosophy, religious studies, honors), two units in mathematics or natural sciences (biology, chemistry, computer science, geological sciences, mathematics, physics, honors) and two units in social science (anthropology and sociology, economics and management, history, political science, psychology, speech communication, honors).

I. Liberal Arts 101: First-Year Seminars

The First-Year Seminars are distinguished by their small class size and close personal attention. Students select from a wide variety of seminars in which academic skills, creativity, active inquiry and collegiality are nurtured. Seminars introduce first-year students to college life by focusing on the process of learning, in and out of the classroom. Seminars share a common weekly community meeting that emphasizes student academic and social transitions. In addition, the First-Year Seminars foster co-curricular outreach. First-Year Seminars have the following characteristics.

  1. They are inquiry-based, writing-intensive, focused on developing critical thinking skills, and they emphasize discussion.
  2. They are as interdisciplinary as possible, exploring multiple modes of inquiry.
  3. They nurture creativity in all forms.
  4. They encourage community-building and outreach as well as co-curricular experiences.

II. The Modes of Inquiry

The Modes of Inquiry core requirement reflects the awareness that there are several fundamental types of analysis that scholars use to understand the world. All Albion College courses require students to employ analytical and creative tools while completing course assignments. A Mode course, however, requires both professor and student to approach the teaching and thinking process with a significantly higher level of self-awareness and intentionality. Students are required not only to think, but also to think about their thinking.

Textual Analysis

Analyzing a text (including works of art and music, written and oral texts, and rituals and symbols) involves understanding not only what meaning that text holds but also how those meanings are produced, what purposes they serve, and what effects they have, as well as exploring the ways in which a text conveys meaning. In order to fulfill this mode of inquiry, courses must:

  1. Focus on the methods of analysis employed by at least one specific discipline or area of scholarship;
  2. Foster inquiry into the particular strengths and weaknesses of those methods;
  3. Require students to analyze texts in writing;
  4. Foster inquiry into the intellectual or cultural systems that produce the text's meaning and effects.

Artistic Creation and Analysis

Courses in this mode focus on the uniquely symbolic and expressive way in which the arts explore and express ideas and feelings. In order to fulfill this mode of inquiry, courses must:

  1. Require the creation or performance, and the analysis of works of art;
  2. Work with culturally produced rather than naturally occurring objects or experiences that have artistic, social or historical significance (for example, art objects, works of literature or various types of performances);
  3. Introduce appropriate forms of critical inquiry and analysis, including area-specific vocabularies, materials, techniques and/or methodologies;
  4. Encourage students to become critical and introspective about their cultural experiences;
  5. Focus on the methods and materials by which the work produces meaning as well as what meanings are to be produced, emphasizing the dialogue between form and content in the area of study.

Scientific Analysis

Courses in this mode involve the observation and interpretation of the natural world. In order to fulfill this mode of inquiry, courses must:

  1. Explore the subject matter and methodology of one or more of the natural sciences;
  2. Demonstrate how fundamental principles of these disciplines form the basis for deriving specific results;
  3. Require students to make observations and formulate hypotheses to explain their observations;
  4. Require students to test their hypotheses or other scientific theories to appreciate their strengths and weaknesses;
  5. Demonstrate applications to human society and the natural world;
  6. Include a laboratory as a significant component of the course.

Modeling and Analysis

Courses in this mode derive some essential or simplified features from logical, physical, social or biological phenomena, and describe and interpret them within an analytical framework. In order to fulfill this mode of inquiry, courses must:

  1. Explore logical, physical, social or biological phenomena;
  2. Enable students to decide which features of the phenomena to describe and what simplifying assumptions to make;
  3. Derive predictions from the model and interpret them in the original context;
  4. Consider the usefulness and the limits of the model and compare it with other possible models.

Historical and Cultural Analysis

Courses in this mode focus on how human knowledge is determined by its cultural and historical context, and how this knowledge in turn shapes cultures and creates historical change. In order to fulfill this mode of inquiry, courses must:

  1. Include material significantly removed from the students' experience either by virtue of cultural or historical distance;
  2. Direct students to investigate their own cultural and historical moment from a perspective informed by their study of culture or history;
  3. Require students to explore the specific cultural context of artifacts, to the extent that the course covers artifacts of a different culture or from a different historical period.

III. Category Requirements

A liberal arts education prepares students to play a critical, thoughtful role as citizens in their society. Courses in environmental, ethnicity, gender and global studies deepen students' understanding of themselves, society and the world by introducing them to many different perspectives. To this end, all students are required to take one unit each in environmental studies, ethnicity studies, gender studies and global studies as specified below.

Environmental Studies

Students are required to take one unit from the list of courses approved as satisfying the environmental studies requirement (see www.albion.edu/registrar/ ). Many of these courses also will satisfy a requirement in a major, in a program, or in a concentration. Each approved course meets the following criteria:

  1. It must substantially enhance students' understanding of the earth's environment.
  2. It must deal substantially with the consequences of human intervention into natural systems.
  3. It must lead students to view the relationship among elements of environmental systems from an interdisciplinary perspective.
  4. It must focus on the perspectives that environmental studies brings to the discipline.

Ethnicity Studies

Students are required to take one unit from the list of courses approved as satisfying the ethnicity studies requirement (see www.albion.edu/registrar/). Many of these courses also will satisfy a requirement in a major, in a program or in a concentration. Each approved course meets the following criteria:

  1. It must foster inquiry into the cultural construction of ethnicity.
  2. It must focus on the perspectives that ethnicity brings to the discipline.
  3. It must place the issues of ethnicity in their historical context. This may include the rediscovery of marginalized texts.
  4. 4. It must provide students with the opportunity to examine their own experiences with ethnicity.

Gender Studies

Students are required to take one unit from the list of courses approved as satisfying the gender studies requirement (see www.albion.edu/registrar/). Many of these courses also will satisfy a requirement in a major, in a program or in a concentration. Each approved course meets the following criteria:

  1. It must foster inquiry into the cultural construction of gender.
  2. It must focus on the perspectives that gender brings to the discipline.
  3. It must place the issues of gender in their historical context. This may include the rediscovery of marginalized texts.

Global Studies

Students have two options in fulfilling this category. (1) They may successfully participate in any approved off-campus study program outside of the United States (or the Border Studies Program) for at least one semester and submit a journal reflecting on their experiences. Detailed journal requirements are available at the Center for International Education. International students may fulfill the global category by submitting a journal, subject to the same requirements, reflecting on their experiences at Albion. (2) They may take one unit from the list of courses approved as satisfying the global studies requirement (see www.albion.edu/registrar/). Many of these courses also will satisfy a requirement in a major, in a program or in a concentration. Each approved course meets the following criteria:

  1. It must have as an organizing focus topics that are international (focusing on a particular region) or global (focusing on an issue pertaining to multiple regions or countries).
  2. It must foster inquiry into the interconnectedness of international issues and students' lives.
  3. It should attempt to bring the world into the classroom so that students learn how to function in an international environment and gain a deeper understanding of the world outside the United States.

The Writing Competence Requirement

Continuous development as a writer is a central part of a liberal arts education. All first-year students and new transfer students are required to take a written placement examination during orientation. The majority of students are placed into and encouraged to enroll in English 101, English Composition. Some students will be invited to enroll in English 101H, the honors section of English Composition. English 101 and 101H serve as prerequisites for all other writing courses. Those students who are placed into English 100, Writing Essentials, must complete the class during their first full semester at Albion. A student placed into English 100 may drop or withdraw from the course only if diagnostic testing done the first week of class alters the student's placement. The class must be taken for a numerical grade. Each year, a few students place out of first-year writing classes. During the sophomore year, these students may enroll in English 203, Advanced Expository Writing; English 205, Introductory Creative Writing; or English 207, Contemporary Journalism.

In order to graduate from Albion, all students must pass a Writing Competence Examination unless they received a 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Test in English Composition or were excused because of a high score on the Albion College Writing Placement Examination taken by entering students.

The Writing Competence Examination (WCE) must be taken before the middle of the sophomore year. Students who do not pass on their first attempt must try the examination a second time before the end of their sophomore year. Upon a second failure, students must contact the director of writing and schedule a meeting to review their most recent WCE. After this initial consultation with the director of writing, students will be required to participate in appropriate writing practice and/or tutoring prior to attempting the examination a third time. See below for the steps required by the director of writing.

Students who have completed 14 units or more, but who have not fulfilled the writing competence requirement--or taken appropriate steps with the director of writing to prepare for this examination--will be required to register for subsequent semesters with the sophomore class. Transfer students who have completed 14 units or more (including transfer courses) will be expected to have taken and passed the WCE before the start of their third semester at Albion College. If the WCE is not successfully completed by the start of the third semester, the student will be required to register for subsequent semesters with the sophomore class.

Appropriate steps with the director of writing include all of the following:

  1. an initial meeting with the director to review the student's most recent failed WCE;
  2. arrangements determined in consultation with the director for appropriate writing practice and/or tutoring from Writing Center staff;
  3. review of writing strategies and guidelines, and practice WCE writing until the student is authorized by the director to attempt the WCE again.

No student may receive a degree from Albion College unless the writing competence requirement has been fulfilled. The WCE will be scheduled at least six times each academic year, and no special arrangements will be made for seniors who have not passed by the last examination, except for those students who have consulted with the director of writing and taken appropriate steps to improve their writing.

The Major Requirement

Albion College offers the following academic majors:

Accounting
Anthropology
Anthropology and Sociology
Art (Studio Art)
Art History
Athletic Training
Biochemistry
Biology
Business and Organizations
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ethnic Studies
Exercise Science
Finance
French

Geological Sciences
German
History
Individually Designed Major
International Studies
Mathematics
Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Public Policy
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Sustainability Studies
Theatre
Women's and Gender Studies

The major requirement represents learning mastery in an area of specialization. Majors are possible in three separate areas—the departmental major, the interdepartmental or interdisciplinary major and the individually designed major.

Departmental majors include a maximum of 10 required units in an academic department as well as possible cognates within other areas. A student may declare two majors. Interdepartmental majors and interdisciplinary majors, with a maximum of 10 required units of course work plus cognates, are also offered.

Detailed requirements for all of the majors listed above appear in the Programs of Study section of this catalog.

Individually Designed Interdepartmental Major (IDIM)

The individually designed interdepartmental major (IDIM) allows freedom of choice. Under this program, students have created their own majors in such fields as arts administration, cognitive science, Latin American studies, political economy, twentieth-century social philosophy, and public health.

A student desiring to propose an individually designed interdepartmental major has usually determined that certain combinations of courses from a variety of departments on the Albion campus will best fulfill his/her career goals. In many instances, that student's career training will primarily focus on the offerings of one department, or one faculty member, who is most knowledgeable in that career area.

  1. The student should propose his/her ideas to a faculty member in the appropriate department for discussion and clarification. The faculty member should be willing to serve as the major adviser.
  2. IDIM proposals must be submitted before the student attains 25 units.
  3. The student and the major adviser should work together in selecting other faculty members who might be included on the student's major committee. The student should then enlist two of these faculty members to serve, with the major advisor, on the major committee. At least one member of the major committee shall be from outside the major adviser's department. If, for any reason, the membership of the major committee is altered, the student is responsible for securing replacements as well as for notifying the provost and the registrar of the change.
  4. The major committee and the student shall then design in detail the nature of the curriculum to be followed for the IDIM. Individually designed interdepartmental majors must include: a minimum of eight units of course work and one unit of directed study whose purpose shall be to demonstrate the student’s ability to perform independent scholarship or creative activity appropriate to the student’s particular program. Typically, the student’s major adviser will supervise the directed study. IDIM programs must be a minimum of nine units, including the directed study, and may not exceed 12 units.
  5. A student may not have completed more than half of the IDIM program prior to submission of the IDIM proposal.
  6. Before beginning the individualized program of study, the student must secure the unanimous approval of the major committee. The student should then submit the form to the Registrar’s Office. The Registrar’s Office will then send the form to the provost for approval. The student should include a proposal of the directed study which should show the role of the directed study in supporting the unique aspect of the IDIM and should be signed by the faculty member who will direct the proposed study. The provost will provide copies of the IDIM to the student, the major adviser and the registrar. A copy of the approved program and any subsequent approved changes will be kept on file with the registrar.
  7. To revise an IDIM, the student must submit a new IDIM application with the changes in the program noted to the Registrar’s Office. All of the changes to the IDIM must be approved by the entire major committee and the provost. The student must also file an explanation for the change in the original IDIM.

Detailed regulations and forms for filing an individually designed major are available from the Registrar's Office.

The Minor Option

In addition to their major, students have the option of choosing a minor in a different area of specialization. Most academic departments offer at least one minor; specific requirements for the various minors are available from the departments.

Requirements in minors for students pursuing teacher certification are available from the Education Department. (Academic departmental minor requirements and the teaching departmental minor requirements may vary; students must contact the Education Department regarding specific requirements.)

Interdepartmental minors are also an option, offered through the cooperation of several academic departments. Students having specific questions regarding these minors should contact the Registrar's Office.

The First-Year Experience

The William Atwell Brown, Jr., and Mary Brown Vacin First-Year Experience assists students in making the transition from high school to college. Through a broad array of academic and co-curricular programs, the First-Year Experience provides a foundation for students that will sustain them throughout their undergraduate years and that will enable them to achieve their academic and personal goals. The principal features of the program are described below.

Academic and General Advising

The advising process begins during new student orientation and continues in periodic meetings with faculty advisers and Student Affairs staff during the first year.

First-Year Seminar (LA 101)

Designed to introduce entering students to the liberal arts tradition, the First-Year Seminars nurture academic skills, creativity and active inquiry. Small class sizes ensure constant interaction among faculty and students. The seminars often address cutting-edge topics, and most include research projects or other hands-on learning experiences. Some feature an extended field trip, to a location in the U.S. or overseas, to give students a firsthand look at the issues they are studying.

Recent seminar topics have included: Genes and Society, Justice, Art in the Environment, Water: Science and Policy, the Holocaust, and Albion and the American Dream. The class schedule, available at www.albion.edu/registrar/, lists the seminars offered for the current academic year.

Richard M. Smith Common Reading Experience

In the Richard M. Smith Common Reading Experience, students and faculty discuss a book and/or other academic works they have read during the preceding summer or at the beginning of fall semester. Past Common Reading Experience selections have included Tamim Ansary's West of Kabul, East of New York, Moises Kaufman's The Laramie Project, Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma,and Rebecca Skloot's The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The Richard M. Smith Common Reading Experience is designed to establish the ideas of scholarship, critical thinking and academic expectations through a common learning experience, and begin student understanding of differences and cross-cultural issues in the context of the Albion College community.

Academic Planning

Throughout their four years at Albion, students are encouraged to think about their career and personal goals, as well as the academic experiences that will enable them to reach those goals. After completing a self-assessment, students create a digital portfolio, which will eventually reflect their academic achievements; internship, research and other practical experiences; leadership accomplishments; and community service. Students utilize self-assessment tools to reflect their academic achievements; internship, research and other practical experiences; leadership accomplishments; and community service.

Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (FURSCA)

The Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (FURSCA) was established to promote and support student research, original scholarship and creative efforts in all disciplines. Through a number of programs, taking place at all points in a student's career at Albion, FURSCA can help students pursue independent study in their areas of interest. Students work closely with a faculty mentor to develop and carry out research or other creative projects. Participation in such projects provides valuable experience beyond the scope of classroom work, and enhances a student's preparedness for future employment or graduate studies. Some examples of FURSCA programs are listed below.

Student Research Partners Program—Geared toward first-year students, this program pairs a student with a faculty mentor to work on a project related to the faculty member's research or creative area. Students gain hands-on experience with scholarship in a specific field, and may elect to continue during their sophomore year. Participation is selective, based on high academic achievement, and stipends are awarded.

Semester Research Grants—Students may apply for funds to support research or other creative projects. Students must work closely with a faculty adviser; however, projects are not limited to any particular discipline. Grants may be awarded to pay for supplies, printing costs, subject payments, software or other costs associated with completion of the project.

Conference Grants—Students are awarded travel funds to help cover expenses associated with travel to attend professional meetings at which they will present the results of their research or creative projects.

Summer Research Fellowships—A select number of students may remain on campus during the summer, earning a stipend, to work on research or creative projects. In addition to working closely with a faculty adviser, students participate in weekly seminars with other students in the program.

Elkin R. Isaac Student Research Symposium—This annual symposium features student research and creative projects from the preceding year. Held each spring in conjunction with the Honors Convocation, this day-long event includes guest speakers and showcases the excellent creative work done by Albion College students.

For further information about FURSCA and its programs, see the FURSCA Web site, www.albion.edu/fursca, or contact the Director of FURSCA, or Starr Weaver, FURSCA coordinator.

Institutes, Programs and Centers

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program

The Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program is designed for students interested in challenges and opportunities that go beyond those offered by traditional lecture and laboratory courses. Through small discussion-based classes, field trips, retreats, guest lecturers, independent research and individualized faculty mentoring, the Program provides a stimulating variety of academic experiences for talented students. All Brown Honors Program graduates culminate their academic experience with an extensive research or creative project. Participation in the Program may be combined with any major and with any of Albion’s career preparation programs in law, medicine, public service, environmental science, or business management.

Academic Program—The academic requirements and course descriptions for the Honors Program appear in the Programs of Study section of this catalog.

Special Features—The Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program Center is located in the historic Observatory building and contains a seminar room for Honors classes, the Honors coordinator's office, as well as meeting, library, computing and study areas for Honors students and their guests. Finally, the Program provides Honors students with opportunities to participate in our Prentiss M. Brown Common Reading Experience, attend popular cultural attractions, have special access to distinguished campus visitors, and to plan and run a variety of other social and intellectual activities through participation in the Honors Council.

Admission—Albion’s Brown Honors Program accepts applications from students who show superior academic promise. Recognizing there is no one criterion by which academic potential is measured, the Honors Committee annually selects a group of applicants whose high school records, scores on national tests, essays and personal interviews indicate exceptional promise. Currently enrolled Albion College students, as well as high school seniors, may apply for admission to the Institute. Contact the Brown Honors Program director at for more information.

Apply to the Brown Honors Program.

Contact the director for more information.

Institutes and Centers

Albion’s Institutes and Centers integrate theoretical and practical learning in distinctive and challenging ways. Intended for students who desire preprofessional preparation and academic work focused in a specialty area, the Institutes and Centers each have a specific curriculum and may include an internship, a capstone experience and opportunities for independent research. Successful completion of an Institute or Center’s program, which is noted on the student’s academic transcript, confers an advantage in gaining admission to graduate or professional school or in beginning a career.

Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service

The Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service assures highly qualified students a broad liberal arts education with concentrated study in the areas of public policy and public service. Special emphasis is given to problem-solving, decision-making and leadership. The Institute carries out President Ford’s vision of training the next generation in the importance of public service in its myriad forms.

Academic Program—The academic requirements and course descriptions for the Ford Institute concentration appear in the Programs of Study section of this catalog. The academic aspect of the Ford Institute allows students of any major to graduate with an understanding of how public policy is made and how it impacts all aspects of American society. The program requires students to complete a one-unit internship in public service.

Activities—Students participate in a range of academic and social activities designed both to expand their understanding of public service and to enhance their ties with others who share their interest in community engagement. Most notably, students complete a customized internship that enhances their job prospects and allows them to work in places as diverse as Washington, D.C., Europe, Africa or closer to home. Students also have opportunities to meet and interact with visitors to campus, including many who are world-renowned scholars, elected officials, researchers or business CEOs. Past visitors have included United States senators, ambassadors, governors and members of Congress, as well as civil rights leaders, famous scientists and business leaders. Students also are provided with opportunities to engage in community service projects with leading organizations in Albion, Detroit, throughout Michigan and around the world.

Admission—Students are admitted to the Ford Institute only after being admitted to Albion College. Admission to the Ford Institute is selective. Participants are selected based on their proven leadership, interest in public service, academic ability and previous involvement in political, community and school activities. All students are expected to maintain a high level of academic performance and, once admitted, to continue their involvement in campus and community affairs and to become involved in Institute activities. Contact the Ford Institute director at for more information.

Apply to the Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service.

Contact the director for more information.

Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management

The Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management combines the traditional strengths of the liberal arts education with business knowledge, skills and experience necessary for entry into leadership and management positions in today’s global business environment. Since 1973, the Gerstacker Institute has earned an excellent reputation for preparing students to be successful in the workplace. The business world is dynamic. By preparing students in the fundamentals of common business practices, as well as creating challenges that provide opportunities to develop critical thought into action, this program creates in-demand employees and future business leaders.

Academic Program—The academic requirements and course descriptions for the Gerstacker Institute appear  under the business and organizations major in the Programs of Study section of this catalog.

Activities—Members of the Gerstacker Institute participate in workshops aimed at building a professional portfolio, developing career search skills, and practicing proper business etiquette. In addition, the Institute regularly hosts speakers from a variety of management fields who share their experiences with students, often one-on-one. Regular participation in these activities is a requirement for continued membership in the Institute.

Admission—The Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management enrolls a select number of students each year. Students considered for admission typically have shown evidence of strong leadership and intellectual abilities as well as interest in and awareness of the world around them. They have above average high school grades and standardized test scores. The application process includes completion of an essay and a personal interview with the Institute director. Students may apply for admission to the Institute along with or subsequent to applying to the College. However, they cannot be admitted to the Institute until they have been accepted by the College.

Students admitted to the Gerstacker Institute may be considered for scholarships which are separate from other aid awarded by Albion College. These scholarships may be renewable each year for up to four years, contingent on a continued high level of academic performance and significant participation in Institute activities.

Due to the limitations on space and the strong interest in the Institute, early application is advised.

Contact the Gerstacker Institute director at for more information.

Apply to the Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management.

Contact the director for more information.

Institute for Healthcare Professions

Albion College’s pre-health professions program has an excellent reputation for providing academic preparation for students wishing to enter healthcare professions, including medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, physician assistant, nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, and public health. The Institute for Healthcare Professions (IHP) supports and enriches the undergraduate education experience of healthcare students by providing academic and career advising, offering health-related courses, and sponsoring workshops, speakers, volunteer and internship opportunities, and a variety of special programs.

By introducing students to key issues in healthcare and focusing on students’ interpersonal competencies as well as their academic competencies, the Institute offers students their critical first steps toward becoming well-educated, compassionate medical professionals.

Academic Program—Students are required to complete the appropriate prerequisite courses for the professional school they plan to attend. Pre-health students can major in any field and are encouraged to explore the full range of liberal arts course offerings in subjects including anthropology, sociology, economics, art, art history, psychology, history, philosophy and many other fields. To graduate as Institute members in good standing, students need to complete Introduction and Issues in Healthcare, a documented experiential learning project, and community service as well as maintain a GPA of 3.0. To graduate with distinction, Institute members must assume a leadership role in the Institute, be eligible to join Alpha Epsilon Delta, the health preprofessional honor society, and achieve a GPA of 3.5.

Admission—Prospective members usually apply for admission to the Institute during the process of applying for admission to Albion College by completing four brief essays about their healthcare interests and experiences. However, students may also apply during their first year of studies or upon transfer to Albion College. Once admitted, students are expected to maintain a high level of academic performance, to continue to explore the healthcare field, and to participate in Institute activities.

Contact the Institute for Healthcare Professions director at for more information.

Apply to the Institute for Healthcare Professons.

Contact the director for more information.

Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

The distinctive focus of the Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development is to link the Albion College Teacher Education Program to the Albion Public Schools and other area schools in innovative and exemplary ways. This intentional engagement with area schools will enhance the preparation of Albion College’s prospective teachers and provide opportunities for a rich multicultural experience and a more meaningful involvement with policy issues.

With support from the Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development, graduates of the Albion Teacher Education Program will become superior teachers—well-versed in their subject areas, highly skilled in developing knowledge with their students and dedicated to engaging their students in lifelong learning. Additionally, the Shurmur Center’s research and scholarship activities, such as the Shurmur Mentorship Practicum and public issues forums, create opportunities for prospective teachers to become knowledgeable about, and involved in, educational reform at the local, state and national levels.

Academic Program—The academic requirements and course descriptions for students in the Teacher Education Program appear under the Education Department in the Programs of Study section of this catalog.

Activities—In addition, the Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development sponsors nationally known speakers for the student teaching capstone lecture, offers public roundtable discussions focused on topics related to education and public policy, and supports field trips to different educational settings to allow students to experience different models of educational practice in other regions of the country or the world. In conjunction with the Ferguson Center for Technology-Aided Teaching and Learning, students are encouraged to thoughtfully integrate the use of technology into their teaching and develop pilot projects, symposia and other structured study with academic technology.

Admission—Students with sophomore standing, who demonstrate both a strong intellect and an ethic of caring as well as successfully complete the two pre-admission courses (Education 202, 203) and the application, are eligible for admission. Applications are reviewed by faculty and staff of the Education Department and the Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development. Similarly qualified students may also be admitted after the second year. Students interested in the Teacher Education Program are advised to fill out an interest form in the Education Department Office in Olin Hall. Contact the coordinator of the Shurmur Center for more information.

Center for Sustainability and the Environment

The Center for Sustainability and the Environment encourages students to understand the environment and the human place in it by combining the intellectual tradition of the liberal arts with the practical experiences gained in internships and research projects. The Center’s majors and concentrations in environmental science and environmental studies and its major in sustainability studies allow students to explore environmental questions through participatory learning and research in preparation for graduate studies and/or careers in regulation, remediation, policy formulation, education and the law. The Center also sponsors internship opportunities, service projects, seminars and travel experiences designed to confirm the relationship between the liberal arts and environmental concerns.

Academic Program—The academic requirements and course descriptions for the majors and concentrations offered through the Center for Sustainability and the Environment appear in the Programs of Study section of this catalog.

Activities—The Center sponsors several other opportunities for student enrichment, including field trips, student research and service projects, a student farm and a seminar program. The Center offers an annual field trip to see important ecosystems within the United States, and human impacts on these systems. To support student research, the Center provides stipends for students who elect to spend the summer on campus working on independent research or service projects. The bi-weekly environmental seminar provides an opportunity for students to hear about other students' research and internship experiences, recent graduates' experiences in work and graduate school, faculty lectures on environmental topics, and senior professionals' reflections on their careers. Albion is an affiliate member of the School for Field Studies, which offers environmental field studies in Australia, Buthan, Cambodia and Vietnam, Costa Rica, East Africa, Panama, Peru, and Turks and Caicos Islands.

Admission—Students must apply for admission to the Center and the majors and concentrations that it sponsors. Normally this step is taken as part of the application process to the College, and most members are admitted as incoming students. Students may also apply during their first two years at the College. Contact the director of the Center for Sustainability and the Environment at for more information.

Apply to the Center for Sustainability and the Environment.

Contact the director for more information.

Concentrations

A concentration is a program of study taken in addition to a major. The purpose of a concentration, which includes an internship, is to help a student explore specific career possibilities within the framework of a liberal arts education. Six to eight units are normally required for a concentration, including all course work and the internship.

Environmental Science, Environmental Studies

See Sustainability and the Environment under Programs of Study section.

Human Services

See Human Services under Programs of Study section.

Law, Justice, and Society

See Law, Justice, and Society under Programs of Study section.

Neuroscience

See Neuroscience under Programs of Study section.

Public Policy and Service

See Public Policy and Service under Programs of Study section.

Other Internship Opportunities

Students may complete full-time internships ranging from working on a newspaper to serving as a pastoral care assistant in a hospital. Online internship postings, along with national directories, are maintained by the Career and Internship Center. Students should consult with the Career and Internship Center, and career development professionals will assist in exploring internship possibilities. Although a number of concentrations have required internship components, internships may be taken by students from all majors.

Students work under the joint supervision of a faculty member and a qualified professional in the field. Before registering for a specific internship, the student must have an appropriate faculty supervisor. See the Academic Regulations and Off-Campus Study sections of the catalog for more details. Internships are offered on a credit/no credit basis only. Up to four units of internship credit may be counted in the total required units for graduation.

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