Spanish

Faculty

Dianne P. Guenin-Lelle, chair, professor, and Howard L. McGregor, Jr., Professor of the Humanities.
B.A., 1979, University of New Orleans; M.A., 1983, University of Louisiana, Lafayette; Ph.D., 1988, Louisiana State University. Appointed 1987.

Teresa Hancock-Parmer, visiting assistant professor.
B.A., 2004, Ball State University; M.A., 2009, Ph.D., 2014, Indiana University. Appointed 2015.

Perry W. Myers, professor.
B.A., 1979, M.B.A., 1981, Baylor University; M.A., 1997, Ph.D., 2002, University of Texas, Austin. Appointed 2004.

Marcie A. Noble, staff lecturer.
B.A., 1997, M.A., 2003, Ph.D., 2014, Western Michigan University. Appointed 2009.

Kalen R. Oswald, associate professor.
B.A., 1995, Utah State University; M.A., 1997, Ph.D., 2001, University of Arizona. Appointed 2002.

Emmanuel T. Yewah, professor.
Licencié-es-Lettres, 1978, Maîtrise, 1979, Université de Yaoundé; M.A., 1982, Ph.D., 1987, University of Michigan. Appointed 1986.

Introduction

A student of modern languages and cultures at Albion can major in French, German or Spanish. A modern language major entails extensive study of the literature and culture of a particular speech community, and it presupposes for all majors a high level of linguistic performance. Similar linguistic capabilities are expected of students who seek a minor. Specific curricula and other requirements are designed to help achieve these goals. The faculty has been chosen based on proven teaching ability, professional reputation, and varied backgrounds and points of view.

Special Features

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the off-campus programs and other international experiences offered at Albion College. Albion's off-campus programs in Argentina, Austria, Cameroon, Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, France, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Sénégal and Spain offer immersion in French, German or Spanish culture and language. Other international off-campus programs are available to students as well (e.g., Belgium, China, Japan and Russia).

Albion College offers language-learning housing for modern language teaching assistants and language students in French, German and Spanish. This residence—called the "I-Space"—serves as a "living laboratory" where Albion College students can practice their conversational skills with fellow students and native speakers. Students speak the intended language within their living quarters and participate in weekly cultural activities organized by the teaching assistants.

French, German and Spanish students attend the Modern Language Conversation Tables held at least once per week in the I-Space.

Departmental Policy on Advanced Placement Credit and Placement

Students may obtain college credit according to their scores on a standardized Advanced Placement (AP) language examination administered at their high schools. A score of 3 merits one-half unit, a 4 merits one unit and a 5 merits one and one-half units of credit at Albion College. A maximum of one unit may be applied toward a major or minor in French, German or Spanish.

Before Student Orientation, Advising and Registration (SOAR) and during the first week of fall semester, the department administers an online placement test for students with prior study of French, German or Spanish. Students with two or more years of high school modern language course work are expected to take the placement test before enrolling in language courses at Albion. This test does not give college credit; its purpose is to place such students at the appropriate level.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major

In most cases a major may be earned in French, German or Spanish by completing a minimum of eight units of study at the 201-level or higher, including the courses specified in the sections on each language (see below for specific details on the different major tracks in each language). Only one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward a major or minor. Students considering a major in a modern language are urged to consult with a faculty member in the department early in the freshman or sophomore year. Off-campus study in an approved study abroad program is required for all majors, and highly recommended for minors. (In the Language and Culture for the Professions minor, an internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience is required.) If individual situations prevent this,the student should speak with the department chair.

Prior to their second language study at Albion College, students are placed in the level most appropriate for their experience. Students will start at the level in which they are placed, and no retroactive credit toward major or minor programs will be awarded.

All majors are required to have at least one semester, preferably a year, of residence in the I-Space language-learning housing and credit for Modern Languages and Cultures 110. If circumstances prevent a student from living in the I-Space, then the student must consult with the department chair.

It is recommended that all majors take cognate courses, for example in English, history, anthropology and sociology, relating to their language of study. Double majors are also encouraged.

Modern Languages and Cultures Courses

Modern Languages and Cultures

105 Intercultural Understanding and Global Issues (1)
Explores theoretical models of how cultures are derived and what it means to interact across cultural boundaries. Applies these theoretical models to selected global issues in order to demonstrate the potentialities and hazards of negotiation of global issues across borders. Useful for preprofessional students who want to attain the skills and knowledge to effectively function in an international/intercultural context. Taught in English. Myers.

107 "Our Americas": Crossing Borders, Cultures and Histories (1)
Serves as a conceptual foundation for the TransAmerican Latino Studies track. An introduction to the cultural dynamics between North and South America, focusing on the interconnectedness of the Western Hemisphere in terms of space, cultures and histories. Taught in English. Pérez Abreu.

110 Language-Learning Residency and Participation in Programs (1/4)
Includes residency in language-learning housing for one semester and active participation in weekly programs in the student’s respective living area as well as in cultural events. Staff.

345 Methods of Teaching Modern Languages and Cultures (1)
Explores the role and purpose of the American educational system as it relates to foreign language teaching; teaches active learning strategies grounded in proficiency-oriented language instruction; allows students to begin to realize their potential as foreign language teachers. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Staff.

French Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major in French

In the French program students learn the language and culture of the French-speaking world. The 100- and 200-level courses focus on how to function within a French-speaking environment, through appropriate language use and cross-cultural understanding. Courses numbered 303-315 are designed to be taken before off-campus study in a French-speaking program and those numbered 351-355 to be taken after return from off-campus study.

The upper-level courses emphasize area studies. Interdisciplinary in scope, they focus on the culture of a particular area or time period and examine the relevant literature as well as social issues, artistic movements, political change, religious influences and film.

The intent is to prepare students for international careers in which they will draw on their communication skills in French, and on their understanding of the history and culture of the French-speaking world.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of eight units at the 201-level or higher, including: one unit from 303-315; one unit from 351-355; and a Senior Seminar (French 400, 1/4 unit). (See detailed description of requirements for major at beginning of Modern Languages and Cultures section.)
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program. (If individual situations prevent this, the student should speak with the department chair.)

Requirements for Minor in French

  • A minimum of six units at the 201-level or higher, including at least four units at the 301-level or higher.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in French Language and Culture for the Professions

As the world continues to become increasingly diverse across traditional borders and cultural boundaries, there will be more demand in the workplace and for communities to effectively negotiate otherness--different ways of living lives--which will directly impact professional practices.

Knowledge of a modern language and culture will continue to grow in importance as a foundation for functioning successfully in a global economy across many professions. This track in French is intended for those students who are pursuing preprofessional studies in fields such as economics and management, communication studies, science or public policy, among others, or for those students who are pursuing more traditional liberal arts fields and wish to add a practical component to their education. This track will provide a combination of preprofessional courses in the target language and cultural courses in order to prepare students for working in a culturally diverse world and economy. Students will be expected to attain high linguistic competence.

Qualified students may choose a "fast track" language program at an approved summer institution domestically or a language/internship program abroad during the summer after their freshman year. To qualify for this special program, a student must complete an interview to be conducted by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. For information about College policies on transfer credit, see the section of this catalog entitled General Academic Regulations.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of nine units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105; French 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; French 303; a seminar (French 401, 1/2 unit); and the remaining units selected from 300- or 400-level French courses. The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the major requirements.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Minor in French Language and Culture for the Professions

  • A minimum of six units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105 (OR French 303 with permission of the department); French 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; French 303; and the remaining unit selected from 300- or 400-level French courses.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in French with Secondary or K-12 Education Certification

  • A minimum of eight units at the 300-level, including: 301 and 302; one unit focusing on France (French 314, 315, 320); one unit focusing on the French-speaking world (French 352, 353, 354, 355); a Senior Seminar (French 400, 1/4 unit). (See detailed description of requirements for major at beginning of Modern Languages and Cultures section.)
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Education 338 or 339 (see Education Department), and Education 371 (K-12).
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Minor in French with Secondary Education Certification

  • A minimum of six units at the 300-level, including: 301 and 302, one unit focusing on France (French 314, 315, 320), one unit focusing on the French-speaking world (French 352, 353, 354, 355) and a Senior Seminar (French 400, 1/4 unit). (See detailed description of requirements for major at beginning of Modern Languages and Cultures section.)
  • Education 338 or 339.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

French Courses

Courses

101 Elementary French (1)
Introduces the French language and the francophone cultures through the study of basic grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Develops the four skills—listening, speaking, reading and writing—necessary for effective interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication. Conducted in French. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. French 101 is recommended for students with two years or less of high school French. Staff.

102 Elementary French, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 101.
Continuation of French 101. Expands vocabulary, grammar and cultural knowledge to enable a more informed interpretation and production of spoken and written communication in French. Conducted in French. Tutorials with teaching assistants integrated into the course. Staff.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

201 Intermediate French (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 102, equivalent or appropriate score on departmental placement test.
Continuation of the study of the French language and culture through the contextualized study of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Continues the development of the four basic skills necessary for the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Authentic tapes and texts are the foundation of the teaching materials. Conducted in French. Tutorials with native speakers are integrated into the course. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

202 Intermediate French, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 201, equivalent or appropriate score on departmental placement test.
Continuation of French 201. Practice with more sophisticated dialogues, reading of unedited short stories, poems and other authentic materials reflecting the various cultures of the French-speaking world. Conducted in French. Tutorials with native speakers integrated into the course. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 Advanced Oral and Written Expression I (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 202, equivalent or appropriate score on departmental placement test.
Development of communication skills in French relative to grammar, syntax, appropriate registers, necessary vocabulary, non-verbal communication and culturally specific idiomatic usage. Also includes the processes of conversation development, thesis formation and strategies for argumentation within French cultural norms, as well as key contemporary issues of importance in the French-speaking world. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

302 Advanced Oral and Written Expression II (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
Development of communication skills in French relative to grammar, syntax, appropriate registers, necessary vocabulary, non-verbal cues and culturally-specific idiomatic usage, as well as skills in French/English and English/French translation. Also includes the processes of conversation development, thesis formation and strategies for argumentation operating within French cultural norms, especially relating to professional life and the workplace. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

303 French for the Professions (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
Offers insights on the French and other French-speaking countries' work environment and the specialized knowledge necessary to communicate effectively in specific professions. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

314 Multicultural France: Current Issues and Historical Perspectives (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
Explores French society as a dynamic multicultural construct—France's changing place in the world, the changing role of women in French society and changing demographics, especially North African immigrants to France—through reading recent novels or short stories representing these issues. Studies the historical dimensions of the social phenomena and the historical reasons for the current situation. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

315 Writing/Filming France Inside Out (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
Applies various theories—narratology, explication de texte, and theories of adaptation—to critically inquire into the construction of literary texts and their filmic representations. Stresses oral and written communication in French. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

320 French Women Writers and Feminist Criticism (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
Analysis of works by French women writers from the Middle Ages to the present, as well as works of feminist critical theory. Offered every three years. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle.

330 French Louisiana: The Cajun and Creole Experiences (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 301 or equivalent.
A study of French Louisiana in both Acadiana and New Orleans, through literature, music, history and other avenues. Guenin-Lelle.

351 French Society from Marie de France to Louis XIV (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
Incorporates literature, art, history and l'histoire des idées, or changing epistemologies, during the French ancien régime (the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the baroque and classical periods of the seventeenth century and the beginning of the Enlightenment in the early eighteenth century). Examines central issues such as the place of "the Divine" and humankind in the universe, the role of classical antiquity relative to traditions, identity and power, the role of women in society and the role of education as a vehicle for change. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

352 Francophone Cultures on the Internet: Fictionalité, Realité, Hypertextualité (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
A study of the theoretical construction of francophone cultures, their representation on the World Wide Web and the problems associated with Web-based cultural research. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

353 Francophone Africa (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
A study of texts and contexts of francophone (Central and West) African societies through in-depth analyses of history, politics, music, art, film and literature, and especially, how those elements have shaped the people's contemporary world view. Conducted in French. Yewah.

354 The French Caribbean: Les Antilles créoles (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
Surveys post-colonialism, la créolisation, le métissage and changing identities. Topics include history and geography of these islands, situating them as part of the New World as well as having enduring cultural, linguistic and political bonds with France; Aimé Césaire and his essentialist quest for identity via Africa and the past; la créolisation, as first proposed by Glissant; and contemporary social issues, represented in literature, art and cinema. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

355 Quebec: A World Apart (1)
Expected level of proficiency: French 303, 314 or 315.
Examines socioeconomic, political, cultural, literary and artistic forces as well as relevant historical situations that have shaped this French-speaking "island" in anglophone North America. Conducted in French. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

398 Practicum (1/2)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Experience in teaching French in the classroom or with individual students under the supervision of an instructor. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

400 Senior Seminar (1/4)
Prerequisite: Declared French major or minor.
Students will reflect on lessons learned in the French program, identify competencies they have developed in French and in other areas of study, understand the importance of these competencies in today's world, and leave Albion more confident in their preparedness to enter the next stage of their professional development. Guenin-Lelle, Yewah.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Special topics in languages, literature or civilization for advanced students. Conducted in French. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Staff.

German Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major in German

Students in the German program study the German language and learn about the social and cultural history of the German-speaking world. Courses at the 100- and 200-level focus on acquiring a basic proficiency in German, an understanding of German culture and an insight into how language and culture are connected.

The upper-level courses are interdisciplinary in scope and focus on different areas of German cultural studies and intellectual history. Their intent is to provide students with a greater understanding of multicultural issues past and present, as well as an awareness of German literary and social history.

A major in German is an excellent preparation for students considering graduate school in a number of different fields, including but not limited to German, history and political science, as well as for international careers, which will draw on students’ ability to read, write and speak German as well as their understanding of and ability to interact with German culture.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of eight units at the 201-level or higher, including 301.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program. (If individual situations prevent this, the student should speak with the department chair.)

Requirements for Minor in German

  • A minimum of six units at the 201-level or higher, including 301.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in German Language and Culture for the Professions

As the world continues to become increasingly diverse across traditional borders and cultural boundaries, there will be more demand in the workplace and for communities to effectively negotiate otherness—different ways of living lives—which will directly impact professional practices.

Knowledge of a modern language and culture will continue to grow in importance as a foundation for functioning successfully in a global economy across many professions. This track in German is intended for those students who are pursuing preprofessional studies in fields such as economics and management, communication studies, science or public policy, among others, or for those students who are pursuing more traditional liberal arts fields and wish to add a practical component to their education. This track will provide a combination of preprofessional courses in the target language and cultural courses in order to prepare students for working in a culturally diverse world and economy. Students will be expected to attain high linguistic competence.

Qualified students may choose a “fast track” language program at an approved summer institution domestically or language/internship program abroad during the summer after their freshman year. To qualify for this special program a student must complete an interview to be conducted by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. For information about College policies on transfer credit, see the section of this catalog entitled General Academic Regulations.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of nine units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105; German 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; German 303; a seminar (German 401, 1/2 unit); and the remaining units selected from 300- or 400-level German courses. The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the major requirements.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Minor in German Language and Culture for the Professions

  • A minimum of six units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105; German 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; German 303; and the remaining unit selected from 300- or 400- level German courses.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in German with Secondary or K-12 Education Certification

  • A minimum of eight units at the 300-level, including: 301 and 302; one unit from historical and cultural studies sequence (306, 307, 350); one unit from text and cultural production sequence (312, 316, 355); and one unit from German ethnic and environmental studies sequence (310, 314).
  • Education 338 or 339 (see Education Department), and Education 371 (K-12).
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward a major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Minor with Secondary Education Certification

  • A minimum of six units at the 300-level or higher, including: 301 and 302; one unit from historical and cultural studies sequence (306, 307, 350); one unit from text and cultural production sequence (312, 316, 355); and one unit from German ethnic and environmental studies sequence (310, 314).
  • Education 338 or 339.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

German Courses

Courses

101 Elementary German (1)
Note: Students who have taken more than one year of German in high school must take the placement test before enrolling in this course. Introduction to German language and culture through the contextualized study of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Study and practice in the four language skills—listening, reading, writing and speaking—necessary for the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Conducted primarily in German. Tutorials with native speakers are required. Myers.

102 Elementary German, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 101 or equivalent.
Continuation of German 101. Expansion of vocabulary, work with more complex grammatical structures. Tutorials with native speakers are required. Myers.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

201 Intermediate German (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 102 or equivalent.
Continuation of the study of German language and culture through the contextualized study of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Continues the development of the four basic skills necessary for the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Authentic tapes and texts are the foundation of the teaching materials. Conducted in German. Tutorials with native speakers are required. Myers.

202 Intermediate German, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 201 or equivalent.
Continuation of German 201. Practice with more sophisticated dialogues, reading of unedited short stories, poems and other authentic materials. Conducted in German. Tutorials with native speakers are required. Myers.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 German Conversation and Composition (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 202 or equivalent.
Development of speaking, listening and writing skills; selective review of complex grammatical structures. Practice speaking about everyday situations in different ways (e.g., role play, dialogues, skits, oral reports); use of audio tapes. Writing of exercises and compositions with emphasis on correctness of expression, stylistic appropriateness and idiomatic usage. Learning of specialized vocabulary and idioms; writing of different types (e.g., dialogues, letters, journals, essays). Myers.

302 German Conversation and Composition, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent.
Continuation of practice in speaking, listening and writing skills; selective review of complex grammatical structures. Practice speaking about everyday situations in different ways (e.g., role play, dialogues, skits, oral reports); use of audio tapes. Writing of exercises and compositions with emphasis on correctness of expression, stylistic appropriateness and idiomatic usage. Learning of specialized vocabulary and idioms; writing of different types (e.g., dialogues, letters, journals, essays). Myers.

303 German Language and Culture for the Professions (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Intended to improve students’ communicative skills in German and provide knowledge for the professions. Covers aspects of the German business world such as banking, marketing and organizational structures. Assignments include development of marketing strategies and development of a business plan for a start-up venture. Myers.

306 German Cultural History: From Germania to Nation State (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Introduces pivotal moments and figures in German cultural history from the Roman Empire to the creation of the first German nation-state in 1871. Provides a deeper understanding of German-speaking culture and society as well as the constructed nature of all forms of national identity. Myers.

307 German Cultural History: Empire, Stunde Null, Reunification (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Explores the radical transformations in German society and culture from the late Wilhelminian era to reunification at the end of the twentieth century through the combination of historical texts, literature, film and “eyewitness” documentation. Situates German cultural history in the larger context of world history. Offered every third year. Myers.

308 Crime Stories and the Nazi Past (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Begins with a brief literary exploration of Christian morals and ethics that developed after the Reformation, then turns to the Romantic fascination with good and evil. Explores early twentieth-century examples of pseudo-crime stories to address such questions as why the German crime fiction tradition emerged so late relative to the British, French or American traditions, or why the “hard-boiled school” only began in Germany during the 1980s. Closes with several detective novels that illustrate how Germans after World War II have sought to come to terms with the Nazi past. Myers.

314 Multiculturalism in Germany (World War II to present) (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or permission of instructor.
Explores how German society has become multiculturally constructed since World War I—from the Holocaust aftermath to current sociocultural debates about the role and treatment of women of color, the large Turkish immigrant population, and Islam and Islamic nationalism in Germany—through the study of various discourses (fiction, essay, speeches, poetry, film, TV news) representing these issues. Studies how perceptions of ethnic difference have evolved in Germany and have become intertwined with social and political debates of the day. Conducted in German. Myers.

316 Crisis in Language: A Literary Survey (1890-1945) (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or 302 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Includes a selection of German works from different genres (plays, short fiction, poetry, theoretical texts) and films from the era 1890-1945. Focuses on each work as a cultural representation of the historical context in which it was written or produced, exploring how each was engaged with the social, political and cultural transformations of the era (e.g., social Darwinism, crisis of narration and language, bourgeois morals, the individual and society, the role of the artist, the Third Reich). Myers.

356 German Film (1)
Expected level of proficiency: German 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
The historical contextualization of German films beginning during the early part of the twentieth century through the post-1989 era. Explores various themes in a specific national setting, while linking to important cultural, political and social issues beyond Germany: (1) the increasing degradation and isolation of the worker in capitalistic society and the breakdown of social class models; (2) emergence of Fascist ideology and the culpability of all Germans for its disaster; (3) the German attempt to come to terms with the past after World War II, but also as Germany sought to reunify after 1989. Through outside readings and in-class discussions considers how all of these films illustrate important German and European, as well as global, social and cultural historical transformations. Myers.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

398 Practicum (1/2)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Experience in language teaching in the classroom or with individual students under the close supervision of a regular instructor. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Special topics in languages, literature or civilization for advanced students. Conducted in German. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Staff.

Spanish Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major in Spanish

  • A minimum of eight units at the 201-level or higher, including: 301, at least two units from 302 through 315, and at least two units from 350 through 402.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program. (If individual situations prevent this, the student should speak with the department chair.)

Requirements for Minor in Spanish

  • A minimum of six units at the 201-level or higher, including: 301, at least one unit from 302 through 315, and at least one unit from 350 through 402.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in Spanish Language and Culture for the Professions

As the world continues to become increasingly diverse across traditional borders and cultural boundaries, there will be more demand in the workplace and for communities to effectively negotiate otherness—different ways of living lives—which will directly impact professional practices.

Knowledge of a modern language and culture will continue to grow in importance as a foundation for functioning successfully in a global economy across many professions. This track in Spanish is intended for those students who are pursuing preprofessional studies in fields such as economics and management, communication studies, science or public policy, among others, or for those students who are pursuing more traditional liberal arts fields and wish to add a practical component to their education. This track will provide a combination of preprofessional courses in the target language and cultural courses in order to prepare students for working in a culturally diverse world and economy. Students will be expected to attain high linguistic competence.

Qualified students may choose a “fast track” language program at an approved summer institution domestically or language/internship program abroad during the summer after their freshman year. To qualify for this special program a student must complete an interview to be conducted by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. For information about College policies on transfer credit, see the section of this catalog entitled General Academic Regulations.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of nine units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105; Spanish 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; Spanish 303; a seminar (Spanish 401, 1/2 unit); and the remaining units selected from 300- or 400-level Spanish courses. The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the major requirements.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Minor in Spanish Language and Culture for the Professions

  • A minimum of six units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 105 or another Spanish course above 303; Spanish 201, 202, 301 or equivalent; Spanish 303; and the remaining units selected from 300- or 400-level Spanish courses.
  • An internship abroad or a documented internship-like experience abroad that has been approved by the MLAC Department.
  • A maximum of one unit Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in TransAmerican Latino/a Studies

Contemporary North and South America have been and continue to be defined by the movement of people immigrating, migrating and transmigrating. As the United States continues to be impacted by the growing demographic, cultural, political and economic presence of Spanish-speaking communities, we face an increased demand to understand the dynamic cultural exchange between the northern and southern hemispheres of the Americas.

The TransAmerican Latino/a studies track is an interdisciplinary opportunity intended for students who seek to be proficient in the Spanish language, while acquiring an understanding of Chicano/a, U.S. Latino/a, Latin American and Caribbean identities. This program is designed to enable students in many fields (anthropology, business, communications, economics, education, health care, law, marketing, international relations, and political science, among others) to gain the linguistic competencies and the cultural aptitudes necessary to effectively work and develop productive ties in this rapidly changing world. By analyzing a broad array of Spanish-language cultural and literary productions, students will develop critical thinking skills in a second language. In addition to high linguistic competency, the TransAmerican Latino/a studies track provides an interdisciplinary perspective that may include courses in the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, English, political science and ethnic studies. This multifaceted approach to the cultures of the Americas and Spanish language will prepare students to engage in a lifelong dialogue on contemporary issues.

The specific requirements for the major are:

  • A minimum of nine units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 107; Spanish 201, 202, 301, or equivalent; Spanish 306 or 307, 362; and a seminar (Spanish 401, 1/2 unit). The remaining units to complete the nine-unit requirement can be selected from Spanish 302, 303 or 304; 306 or 307; 315, 350, 361, 402 (provided the topic of the course deals with the Americas). The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the major requirements.
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program in the Americas.
  • History 142, 270, or 301, or approved courses in anthropology and sociology, political science, English and ethnic studies may count toward the major with departmental permission.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Minor in TransAmerican Latino/a Studies

  • A minimum of six units, including: Modern Languages and Cultures 107; Spanish 201, 202, 301 or equivalent; Spanish 362; a seminar (Spanish 401, 1/2 unit). The remaining units to complete the six-unit requirement can be selected from Spanish 302, 303, or 304; 306 or 307; 315, 350, 361, or 402 (provided the topic deals with the Americas). The seminar must be taken after all other requirements have been met or in the final semester of completion of the minor requirements.
  • Students are placed in the 200- or 300-level language courses according to proficiency. Students must fulfill the six-unit requirement beginning at the level into which they are placed.
  • History 142, 270, or 301, or approved courses in anthropology and sociology, political science, English and ethnic studies may count toward the minor with departmental permission.
  • A maximum of one unit Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.

Requirements for Major in Spanish with Secondary or K-12 Education Certification

  • A minimum of eight units at the 300-level or higher, including: 301; 302, 303, or 304; one unit from courses focusing on Latin America (306, 314, 361), one unit from courses focusing on TransAmerican Latino/a studies (307, 362); and one unit from courses focusing on Spain (305, 360).
  • Study abroad in an approved off-campus program in the Spanish-speaking world.
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the major.
  • Education 338 or 339 (see Education Department) and Education 371 (K-12).
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Minor in Spanish with Secondary Education Certification

  • A minimum of six units at the 300-level or higher, including: 301; 302, 303, or 304; one unit from courses focusing on Latin America (306, 314, 361); one unit from courses focusing on TransAmerican Latino/a studies (307, 362); and one unit from courses focusing on Spain (305, 360).
  • Residence in language-learning housing for at least one semester and successful completion of Modern Languages and Cultures 110.
  • Completion of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages' Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) examination at an "Advanced Low" level of proficiency (or higher). Students should consult closely with the Modern Languages and Cultures Department and consider taking this examination directly after the study abroad experience.
  • A maximum of one unit of Advanced Placement credit can count toward the minor.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Education 338 or 339.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Spanish Courses

Courses

For those students with previous experience in Spanish, a placement test will be used in order to determine the appropriate entry-level course. Only those students who have had no previous experience with Spanish may initially enroll in Spanish 101. In order to ensure classes of relatively equal skill levels, the professor reserves the right to reassign any student who does not seem appropriately qualified for the course in which he or she has enrolled.

101 Elementary Spanish (1)
Introduces Spanish language and Hispanic culture through the contextualized study of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Develops the four essential skills—reading, writing, listening and speaking—necessary for the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

102 Elementary Spanish, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 101, appropriate score on departmental placement test or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Spanish 101. Expands vocabulary, grammar and cultural knowledge to enable a more informed interpretation and production of written and spoken communication in Spanish. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

201 Intermediate Spanish (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 102, appropriate score on departmental placement test or permission of instructor.
Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Increased emphasis on conversation, composition and cultural awareness. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

202 Intermediate Spanish, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 201 or permission of instructor.
Continued review of language structure, with particular emphasis on developing conversational skills. Improves fluency through conversation and discussion of writing assignments and literary and cultural readings. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 Advanced Oral and Written Expression (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 202, appropriate score on departmental placement test or permission of instructor.
Development of communication skills in Spanish relative to grammar, syntax, appropriate registers, necessary vocabulary, non-verbal cues and culturally specific idiomatic usage. Also includes the processes of conversation development, thesis formation and strategies for argumentation operating within Hispanic cultural norms, as well as key contemporary issues of importance to the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

302 Advanced Oral and Written Expression through Hispanic Film (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Development of communication skills in Spanish relative to grammar, syntax, appropriate registers, necessary vocabulary, non-verbal cues and culturally specific idiomatic usage. Also includes the processes of conversation development, thesis formation and strategies for argumentation operating within Hispanic cultural norms, as well as key contemporary issues of importance to the Spanish-speaking world. Improves fluency through the viewing, analysis and interpretation of Hispanic film. Conducted in Spanish. Tutorials with teaching assistants are integrated into the course. Staff.

303 Spanish for the Professions (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Designed for students who are interested in studying Spanish in the context of activities related to the professional world (business, health care, education, finance, law, social work, etc.). Emphasizes the specialized vocabulary of the professional world and requires a working knowledge of Spanish grammar. Includes topics ranging from specific professions, to generalized professional concerns, to translation. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

304 Advanced Oral and Written Expression through Creative Writing (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Focus will vary, but may include the following: “Spanish/Latin American/ U.S. Latino Theatre,” “Spanish/Latin American/ U.S. Latino Short Story” and “Spanish/Latin American/ U.S. Latino Poetry.” Introduces the respective genre through readings of literary works and critical and theoretical studies. Includes development of a portfolio of creative writing projects produced individually and collaboratively. Conducted in Spanish. Oswald.

305 Multicultural Spain: Historical Perspectives and Current Issues (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Explores Spanish society as a dynamic multicultural construct—Spain’s changing role in the world; the intersection of Castilian, Galician, Andalusian, Catalan and Basque cultures; shifting demographics, etc.—through the study of historical and literary texts, media sources, and other pertinent cultural artifacts. Studies the historical dimensions of the social phenomena and the historical reasons for the contemporary social, political and cultural situation. Conducted in Spanish. Oswald.

306 South American Identities and Cultural Perspectives (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Examination of past, present and future struggles for identity and cultural perspective in South America, with a focus on the Southern Cone and Andes regions. Explores cultural artifacts such as music, visual arts, performance arts, literature, popular culture and folklore in South America from the pre-Columbian period to the twenty-first century. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

307 Cultural Encounters: Caribbean, Mexico and Central America (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Examines past, present and future struggles of cultural encounters and production in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, Mexico and Central America. Explores cultural artifacts such as music, visual arts, performance arts, literature, popular culture and folklore from the legacy of the pre-Columbian period to the twenty-first century and considers this region’s growing interaction with the United States. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

314 Storytellers (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the workings of storytelling. Focuses on the short story as a genre to explore the different ways of narrating through key literary and cultural movements that have defined the Spanish-speaking world, including the oral and pre-Columbian traditions, romanticism, modernism and magical-realism. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

315 Hispanic Studies: Textual Analysis and Interpretation (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 301 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the analysis, interpretation and appreciation of Hispanic literature and culture, focusing on a variety of cultural artifacts from the Spanish-speaking world (literature, painting, music, film, etc.). Special attention will be given to theoretical concerns. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

350 Women in Hispanic Literature (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 314 or 315 or permission of instructor.
Emphasizes careful reading and discussion of Hispanic prose, poetry and drama, with critical skills being applied particularly to the analysis of female characters and/or to the perspective of women authors. Writing assignments assess students’ comprehension of texts and ability to apply analytical skills within the context of a gender-based theoretical framework. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

360 Key Issues in Spanish Literature and Culture (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 305 or 314 or 315, or permission of instructor.
Analysis of a special problem, topic, issue, phenomenon, period, author, genre or movement in Spanish literature and/or culture from its beginning to the present. Conducted in Spanish. Oswald.

361 Key Issues in Latin American Literature and Culture (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 306 or 314 or 315, or permission of instructor.
Analysis of a special problem, topic, issue, phenomenon, period, author, genre or movement in Latin American literature and/or culture from its beginning to the present. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

362 Key Issues in U.S. Latino/Chicano Literature and Culture (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 307 or 314 or 315, or permission of instructor.
Analysis of a special problem, topic, issue, phenomenon, period, author, genre or movement in U.S. Latino or Chicano literature and/or culture from its beginning to the present. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

398 Practicum (1/2)
Experience in language teaching in the classroom or with individual students under the close supervision of a regular instructor. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Expected level of proficiency: Spanish 314 or 315 or permission of instructor.
Variable topic seminar. Conducted in Spanish. Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Directed studies generally are reserved for those students who have schedule conflicts between two majors. They are also available for students pursuing honors theses. In specific cases, students may request directed studies that cover topics beyond the scope of the current curriculum. These students are expected to present their proposed plan of study to the instructor for approval well in advance of registration. Staff.