Spanish

Staff

John Bedient, interim director, Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management and Associate Professor of Economics and Management.
B.A., 1975, Alma College; M.B.A., 1978, Indiana University, CPA, 1977.

Laurel Draudt, associate director, Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management.
B.A., 1997, Marietta College; M.A., 2006, The Ohio State University.

Introduction

The Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management encourages students to explore the practical and dynamic subject of business from many perspectives. Two academic programs exist within the Institute—a business and organizations major and a business and organizations minor—providing a solid educational foundation in business by incorporating subjects like accounting, economics, statistics, professional communication and writing, global issues, management, and ethics. The course work is further enhanced by developing critical thinking and leadership skills through other opportunities such as Gerstacker Institute speakers, networking with business executives and participation in the first-year workshop, sophomore summer, internships and the senior capstone experience. Required internships, available in diverse work settings, allow students to experience various career paths and to put their education into practice.

Students must be admitted to the Gerstacker Institute to pursue this major and minor. Visit the Gerstacker Institute website for information on the application process.

Major and Minor

Requirements for Major

Note: Classes in italics are taught during Summer College.

To assist students in their academic planning, see a sample four-year course of study.

A minimum of eight and one-half units including the following:

  • Business 111, Gerstacker Leadership Workshop (1/4 unit)
  • Economics and Management 211, Financial Accounting
  • Intercultural/Global Issues:
    One unit selected from the following:
    Modern Languages and Cultures 105, Intercultural Understanding and Global Issues;
    Economics and Management 362, International Management; French 201, Intermediate French or higher; German 201, Intermediate German or higher; or Spanish 201, Intermediate Spanish or higher
  • Ethics: One unit selected from the following:
    Philosophy 301, Environmental Ethics
    Philosophy 302, Leadership Ethics
    Philosophy 303, Business Ethics
    Philosophy 304, Ethics and Public Policy
    Philosophy 308, Biomedical Ethics
    Philosophy 309, International Ethics and Global Development
  • English 208, Professional Writing
  • Communication Studies 242, Professional Communication
  • Management/Psychology: One unit at the 300-level
  • Economics and Management 357, Business Functions
  • Two one-unit internships:
    Two options are available for fulfilling the internship requirement: (1) two full-time internships or (2) one full-time internship and one off-campus semester in an approved Albion College program
  • Senior Capstone (1/4 unit)
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

The following are required in addition to the major:

  • Statistics:
    Mathematics 209, An Introduction to Statistics; Mathematics 309, Mathematical Statistics; or Economics and Management 235, Economic Statistics (1 unit)
    Or
    Psychology 204, Research Design and Analysis I, and 206, Research Design and Analysis II (2 units)
  • Economics and Management 230, Intermediate Microeconomics or 232, Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • Completion of a second area of specialization selected from these options: (1) an existing Albion College minor, (2) a College-approved emphasis or concentration, (3) a second major, or (4) a five-unit area of focus, determined in collaboration with the Gerstacker Institute director, along with the majority approval of the Gerstacker Internal Advisory Committee and the provost.

Requirements for Minor

A minimum of five and one-quarter to seven units including the following:

Core requirements:

  • Business 111, Gerstacker Leadership Workshop (1/4 unit)
  • Economics and Management 211, Financial Accounting (1 unit)
  • Economics and Management 259, Management/Psychology (1 unit)

Choice of one in each section:

  • English 208, Professional Writing OR Communication Studies 242, Professional Communication
  • Intercultural/Global Issues. One unit selected from the following:
    Modern Languages and Cultures 105, Intercultural Understanding and Global Issues; Economics and Management 362, International Management; French 201, Intermediate French or higher; German 201, Intermediate German or higher; or Spanish 201, Intermediate Spanish or higher

OR

Ethics - One unit selected from the following:
Philosophy 301, Environmental Ethics
Philosophy 302, Leadership Ethics
Philosophy 303, Business Ethics
Philosophy 304, Ethics and Public Policy
Philosophy 308, Biomedical Ethics
Philosophy 309, International Ethics and Global Development

Internship

  • Business and Organizations 392 (1 unit) - Two options:
    1. One full-time internship, or
    2. One off-campus semester in an approved Albion College program that combines course work and an internship

The following are required in addition to the minor:

  • Economics and Management 101, Principles of Microeconomics (1 unit)
  • Statistics:
    Mathematics 209, An Introduction to Statistics; Mathematics 309, Mathematical Statistics; or Economics and Management 235, Economic Statistics (1 unit)
    Or
    Psychology 204, Research Design and Analysis I, and 206, Research Design and Analysis II (2 units)

Area of Focus

Business Communication
Effective communication is the foundation of every effective business. The area of focus in business communication draws from communication studies, management and psychological sciences in order to better equip students with the necessary skills and abilities. Specifically, students will gain a better understanding of communication and associated techniques, human behavior, motivation, and performance, and how to effectively manage the resources of a business (human, financial and physical). Careers individuals pursue with an interest in business communication include public relations/media relations, corporate communications, public affairs, investor relations, government relations, marketing communication, and community relations.

The business communication area of focus is designed around two components: (1) a common core of two fundamental courses, and (2) a variety of courses addressing critical areas of business communication.

Requirements for the area of focus in business communication (5 units) are: Communication Studies 203 and Psychology 236; and three units chosen from the following electives: Communication Studies 205, 303, 306; Economics and Management 358, 359; Psychology 346.

All courses for an area of focus must be taken for a numerical grade.

Business and Organizations Courses

111 Gerstacker Leadership Workshop (1/4)
Explores issues faced by a wide variety of professions—from medicine to professional sports. Considers common models of strategic thinking and theory. Includes professional writing exercises and the use of Excel as an analytical tool. Students complete a final project showcasing the application of the theories and common business themes presented in the course. Required for all students who wish to pursue a business and organizations major or minor.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internships (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor. Staff.

Interdisciplinary Major in Integrated Science with Elementary Certification

Requirements for Major

  • Nine units including:
    Biology 195, 210
    Chemistry 121, 123
    Geology 103, 115
    Physics 105, 115, 116
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Minor

  • Please note that the courses for the major can be counted toward the minor in the respective field.

Biology—Biology 195, 210 (from major), 215 or 216; 225, 227, or 314; one additional unit in biology (200-level or above) selected with departmental approval; Chemistry 121 (from major).

Chemistry—Chemistry 121, 123 (from major); 206, 211, 301 (with prerequisite of Mathematics 141 or equivalent) or 337.

Geology—Geology 103, 115 (from major); 101, two units (200-level or above) selected with departmental approval.

Physics—Physics 105, 115, 116 (from major); 102 or 245; 205; Geology 101.

Requirements for Elementary Certification

Students seeking elementary certification with a major in integrated science are required to consult with the Education Department and meet admission requirements to the teacher education program (TEP). Certification in elementary education requires 14 units of additional course work and often necessitates a ninth semester for student teaching. Students completing an integrated science major fulfill the certification requirement for a science course with a laboratory as part of the requirements for the major.

  • Complete a planned program including:
    English 203 (English 101 is a prerequisite), 348
    History 131
    IDY 262
    Mathematics 104
    Psychology 251 (Psychology 101 is a prerequisite)
    Education 202, 203, 247, 259, 319, 371, 372; two units (one of which must be in your minor) from 374, 375, 376, 377; 396, 421, 431
  • Complete six units of professional sequence course work and four units of student teaching; Education 202, 203, 247, 259, 371, 372, 396, 421 and 431.
  • All courses must be taken for a numerical grade.

Interdisciplinary Major in Social Studies with Elementary Certification

Requirements for Major

  • 14 units including:
    Anthropology and Sociology 248, 250
    Economics and Management 101, 102
    Geological Sciences 111
    History 102, 111, 131, 132, 217, two 300-level history electives (at least one unit of elective must be from African, Asian or Latin American history)
    Political Science 101, 235
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Elementary Certification

Students seeking elementary certification with a major in social studies are required to consult with the Education Department and meet admission requirements to the teacher education program (TEP). Certification in elementary education requires 32.5 units of course work and necessitates a ninth semester for student teaching.

  • Complete a planned program including:
    Education 319
    English 203 (English 101 is a prerequisite), 348
    IDY 262
    Mathematics 104
    Psychology 251 (Psychology 101 is a prerequisite)
    SCI 285
  • Complete six units of professional sequence course work and four units of student teaching semester: Education 202, 203, 247, 259, 371, 372, 396, 421 and 431.
  • All courses must be taken for a numerical grade.

Interdisciplinary Major in Social Studies with Secondary Certification

Requirements for Major

  • 14 units including:
    Anthropology and Sociology 248, 250
    Economics and Management 101, 102
    Geological Sciences 111
    History 102, 111, 131, 132, 217, two 300-level history electives (at least one unit of elective must be from African, Asian or Latin American history)
    Political Science 101, 235
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • Completion of all other requirements for teacher certification.

Requirements for Secondary Certification

Students seeking secondary certification with a major in social studies are required to consult with the Education Department and meet admission requirements to the teacher education program (TEP). Certification in secondary education requires 25 units of course work and necessitates a ninth semester for student teaching.

  • Complete six units of professional sequence course work and four units of student teaching: Education 202, 203, 349, 373, 397, 422 and 432; and Psychology 251. (Psychology 101 is a prerequisite.)
  • All courses must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

Liberal Arts Core Courses

For further information about these courses, refer to the core requirement section in this catalog under Academics at Albion College. Specific course descriptions of Liberal Arts 101 seminars are available from the First-Year Experience Web page.

LA 101 First-Year Seminar (1)
An interdisciplinary special topics seminar that emphasizes development of strong written and oral communication. Seminars help first-year students make a positive transition to college academics by focusing on the process of learning, in and out of the classroom. Seminars share a common weekly community meeting that emphasizes student academic and social transitions. Some travel is associated with many seminars. A course fee may apply. Open only to first-year students. Staff.

Faculty

Robert I. Moss, chair and professor.
B.S., 1975, M.A., 1980, Western Michigan University; Ph.D., 1988, Southern Illinois University. Appointed 2000.

Heather H. Betz, assistant professor.
B.A., 1996, Saint Mary’s College of California; M.A., 2005, San Francisco State University; Ph.D., 2011, Michigan State University. Appointed 2011.

Holly M. Hill, visiting instructor.
B.A., 2005, Hope College; M.A., 2007, Western Michigan University. Appointed 2014.

Carol P. Moss, staff lecturer.
B.S., 1981, Ohio State University; M.A., 1982, Kent State University. Appointed 2000.

Introduction

A liberal arts education should provide the means to enhance one's mind, body and soul. The Kinesiology Department provides the student with an opportunity to pursue academic disciplines that will enable them and ultimately others to gain knowledge that will positively affect their lives and the lives of those around them. Presenting academic disciplines that result in a physically healthy existence as well as a vigorous intellectual life is the goal of the Kinesiology Department.

Kinesiology Department Website

Career Opportunities

The athletic training major prepares students to sit for the national Board of Certification examination. Approximately 75 percent of the graduates in this major continue on to get their master's degree and then employment in athletic training, working at colleges, high schools or clinics. Some have pursued doctorates in a related academic discipline. Another 20 percent have pursued degrees in other health fields to become physicians (D.O., M.D.), physician assistants and physical therapists.

The exercise science major has been developed to prepare students for careers in health and wellness including but not limited to personal training and strength and conditioning. Our majors will be prepared to apply to graduate programs in exercise science, physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician assistant. Others may choose to sit for the American College of Sports Medicine certifications as a personal trainer or health fitness specialist. Additionally, students will be prepared to enter into careers in cardiac rehabilitation.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major in Athletic Training

Albion College's Athletic Training Education Program has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). As graduates of a CAATE-accredited education program, our students can sit for the national Board of Certification examination.

Students must apply for admission to the athletic training major after enrolling at Albion College. All admission criteria, retention criteria, and required application forms may be obtained from the athletic training program director or by downloading them from the Athletic Training Education Program Web site at http://www.albion.edu/athletictraining. Transfer students must follow all of the admission procedures as outlined in this section. Credit for course work from other institutions will be handled on an individual basis.

Completed application packets are due the Monday after fall break for fall admission and the Monday after spring break for spring admission. The athletic training program can be completed in a minimum of five semesters although this minimum is not encouraged. Students may participate on one athletic team while completing the athletic training major, but those students may be expected to complete some program requirements during the summer, in an extra fall semester, or during their athletic season if appropriate progress is not attained.

  • Students in the athletic training major must complete thirteen and three-quarter units of required and prerequisite course work including the following: Kinesiology 194, 211, 213, 233, 240, 244, 254, 290, 295, 310, 344, 353, 354, 369, 379, 390, 395, 401, 453, and 494.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • The following cognate is required: Psychology 101.
  • Athletic training students must meet a 900-hour clinical requirement over the course of a minimum of five semesters. While students majoring in athletic training may play one sport, these individuals must be aware that attaining the 900-hour clinical requirement is made more difficult because of time spent playing their sport, and they may need to obtain clinical experience in the summer or attend Albion for an extra semester.

Requirements for Major in Exercise Science

  • Ten and one-half units including: Kinesiology 207, 211, 213, 233, 240, 310, 368, 369, 379, 381 and 382.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

Requirements for Minor in Exercise Science

  • Five and one-half units, including: Kinesiology 211, 240, 368, 369, 379 and one of the following: 381 or 382.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

Kinesiology Courses

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

194 Introduction to Clinical Laboratories (1/2)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the athletic training major or permission of instructor.
The theory behind basic athletic training practices and the application of the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

200 Medical Terminology (1/2)
Focuses on the language of medicine—the prefixes, suffixes, word roots and their combining forms—by review of each system of the body. Emphasizes word construction, spelling, usage, comprehension and pronunciation. Introduces students to anatomy and physiology, pathology, diagnostic/surgical procedures, pharmacology and medical abbreviations. Betz, C. Moss.

201 Foundations of Healthful Living (1)
An in-depth presentation of crucial health issues emphasizing the need and effect of exercise and physical activity on the body. Included are units on the cardiovascular system, the muscular system, nutrition, diet, weight control, drugs, fitness and physical profiles, plus individualized exercise and activity programs. Lecture and laboratory. Staff.

203 First Aid (1/2)
Basic and advanced course work and skills in the following areas: CPR, first aid, automated external defibrillator, emergency and non-emergency management of injuries and illnesses and professional rescuer skills. American Red Cross certificates may be earned in each area. Required for the students enrolled in the teacher education program, health minor and athletic training major. Staff.

205 Water Safety Instructor (1/2)
Prerequisite: Current Red Cross Emergency Water Safety Skills and Swimmer Skills.
Designed for students who seek professional insights into teaching and administering aquatic programs, and community swimming programs. The American Red Cross water safety instructor's certificate may be earned. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

207 Introduction to Kinesiology (1)
An introduction to the interdisciplinary approach to the science and study of human movement. Provides an orientation to various educational pathways, requirements and career opportunities in kinesiology in the areas of teaching, coaching, therapeutic exercise, fitness and health, and sport management professions. Includes basic concepts of the kinesiology discipline and an overview of the relevance of foundational sub-disciplines. Addresses issues, challenges and current/future trends. Exercise science majors must take this course for a numerical grade. Betz, C. Moss.

211 Human Systems Anatomy (1)
Emphasizes the body systems most involved with human movement, sport and exercise (e.g., skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, nervous and respiratory). Provides basic information on systems considered less important to human movement (e.g., integumentary, lymphatic, urinary, digestive and endocrine). Betz, R. Moss.

213 Athletic Injuries Prevention and Treatment (1)
An overview of athletic training and its role as an allied health profession: the history and evolution of athletic training, basic sports-related injury prevention and assessment procedures, rehabilitation techniques, therapeutic modalities and athletic training management and administration. Development of hands-on skills, such as taping, basic rehabilitation and modality implementation, in lecture and laboratory sessions. Staff.

233 Human Gross Anatomy (1)
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 211.
The basic musculoskeletal anatomical concepts related to the human body. Emphasizes applications to physical activity and musculoskeletal injury. Lecture and laboratory (cadaver). R. Moss.

240 Sports Nutrition (1/2)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Introduction to nutrition as the study of foods and their effects upon health, development and performance of the individual. Emphasizes the role nutrition plays in the improvement of athletic performance and the physiological processes of nutrient utilization by the human body. Staff.

243 Athletic Injury Assessment Techniques (1)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 233, acceptance into the athletic training major or permission of instructor.
The anatomical and physiological foundation necessary to assess the physically active individual. Strategies used for systematic and thorough evaluation, and referral procedures used following assessment to ensure a continuum of care. C. Moss.

244 Lower Extremity Assessment (1)
Designed to provide the anatomical and physiological foundation necessary to perform and understand the assessment of lower extremity pathology in physically active individuals. Utilizes specific evaluation strategies to develop a plan for systematic and thorough evaluation. Stresses appreciation of the referral procedures following assessment to ensure a continuum of care. May not be taken credit/no credit. C. Moss.

253 Therapeutic Rehabilitation and Modalities I (1)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 233, acceptance into the athletic training major or permission of instructor.
The basic concepts related to the modality use and rehabilitation concepts of the physically active individual: modality selection, pharmacological considerations, record-keeping, program design and implementation, and safety. The psychology of rehabilitation, including goal-setting and motivation. Clinical application of rehabilitation techniques, including strategies for proper exercise selection based on anatomical and physiological considerations, program administration, and guidelines for program progression. C. Moss.

254 Therapeutic Rehabilitation (1)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into athletic training major and Kinesiology 233, or special permission by ATEP program director or instructor.
Provides the foundational components necessary to understand and perform appropriate therapeutic rehabilitation methods for physically active individuals. Specific strategies are utilized to develop and plan systematic and thorough rehabilitation protocols. Current literature and techniques in the field support the course content. C. Moss.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

290 Clinical Experience I (1/4)
Presents the theory behind introductory athletic training practices and the clinical applications of these practices. Develops proficiency in the application of the specific competencies in supervised clinical situations. May not be taken credit/no credit. Staff.

293 Clinical Laboratory in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the athletic training major.
The theory behind introductory athletic training practices and the clinical applications of these practices. Development of proficiency in the application of the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

294 Clinical Laboratory II in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the athletic training major.
The theory behind basic athletic training practices and clinical applications. Development of proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

295 Clinical Rehabilitation (1/4)
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Kinesiology 254.
Presents the theory behind upper extremity athletic training practices and clinical applications, as well as developing proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. C. Moss.

310 Research and Statistics in Kinesiology (1)
Qualitative and quantitative research approaches specific to the various disciplinary areas in kinesiology. Topics include research ethics; selecting and developing a research problem; reviewing the literature, developing research hypotheses, writing research proposals; issues in measurement, data collection issues; statistical analyses; and communicating the results of research. Betz.

342 Advanced Techniques in Athletic Training (1)
Prerequiste: Kinesiology 253.
Advanced rehabilitative and modality techniques including modality selection, application and safety criteria for the care of the physically active, including gait and orthotic evaluation and fitting, electrical stimulation, manual therapy techniques, and corrective exercises in rehabilitation. C.Moss.

344 Upper Extremity Assessment (1)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into athletic training major, Kinesiology 233, or special permission by ATEP director or instructor.
Provides the anatomical and physiological foundation necessary to perform and understand the assessment of upper extremity pathology in the physically active individual. Specific evaluation strategies are utilized to develop a plan for a systematic and thorough evaluation. Appreciation of the referral procedures following assessment are stressed to ensure a continuum of care. Current literature and techniques in the field support the course content. C. Moss.

353 Athletic Training Administration (1/2)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 213, acceptance into the athletic training major.
The administrative issues of athletic training: basic management theory and the medical model relative to various athletic training settings; human resources, facilities and budget, insurance, information management and research; practice requirements and documents in the athletic training profession. Staff.

354 Therapeutic Modalities (1)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into athletic training major and Kinesiology 233, or special permission by ATEP program director or instructor.
Provides the foundational components necessary to understand and utilize appropriate modalities for physically active individuals. Specific strategies are utilized to develop and plan systematic and thorough modality protocols. Current literature and techniques in the field support the course content. C. Moss.

368 Kinesiology and Biomechanics (1)
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 233.
Applies anatomical knowledge and mechanical principles to skills in motor activity, exercise, sport and daily activities. R. Moss.

369 Human Physiology (1)
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 211.
An introduction to the study of the physiological phenomena presented by the human body. Focuses on the function of organs and organ systems and includes practical applications in kinesiology and the care and prevention of athletic injuries. Betz.

379 Exercise Physiology (1)
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 369 or permission of instructor.
An examination of the mechanisms and processes by which the body performs its various functions. Emphasis on cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and nervous systems as they relate to physical activity. Betz.

381 Foundations of Exercise Testing and Prescription (1)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 240, 368, 379.
Provides the knowledge and tools to properly conduct various aspects of exercise testing such as the assessment of risk stratification, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, body composition and flexibility. Applies these assessments in development of exercise programs and prescriptions for both a general health and fitness population and a clinical population. Emphasizes the American College of Sports Medicine’s guidelines for exercise testing and prescription with specific focus on the knowledge, skills and abilities for the Health Fitness Specialist Certification. Betz.

382 Advanced Exercise Testing and Prescription (1)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 240, 368, 379.
Further exploration of the various aspects of exercise testing and prescription, such as risk stratification, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, and flexibility, but with a focus on an athletic population. Covers the physiological mechanisms associated with anaerobic and aerobic conditioning, and muscular and cardiovascular evaluation and conditioning. Betz.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

390 Clinical Experience III (1/4)
Presents the theory behind intermediate athletic training practices and clinical applications. Develops proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. May not be taken credit/no credit. Offered every other fall. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of department.
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

393 Clinical Laboratory III in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 213, acceptance into the athletic training major.
Presents the theory behind intermediate athletic training practices and clinical applications. Develops proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

394 Clinical Laboratory IV in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 213, acceptance into the athletic training major.
The theory behind intermediate athletic training practices and clinical applications. Development of proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

395 Clinical Experience IV (1/4)
The theory behind basic athletic training practices and the use of clinical modalities. Development of proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

401 Athletic Training Senior Seminar (1/2)
Prerequisite: Senior status in the athletic training major.
Current and advanced topics in athletic training. Includes fall semester clinical component. Staff.

402 Seminar (1)
Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Staff.

453 Medical Conditions in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 213, acceptance into the athletic training major.
Interactions with medical and allied health care professionals in the field to develop an understanding of pathologies and the pharmacological treatment of pathologies common in physically active individuals. Basic principles, ethical and legal issues of pharmacology and precautions, and the policies and procedures of storing and documenting pharmaceuticals in an allied health care setting. Staff.

494 Colloquium in Athletic Training (1/4)
Prerequisite: Senior status in the athletic training major.
A case study approach to injuries as seen by students in the field. Includes spring semester clinical component. C. Moss.

Wellness Courses

A maximum of four activity courses (100 level, 1/4 unit) in physical education and theatre (dance) may be used toward completing the 32 units required for graduation.

123 Riding—English (1/4)
English riding skills, with a strong emphasis on safety and confidence-building in the saddle. Students are assessed on their first day to determine their experience and ability. Students may ride their own horse or use a school horse. Riders must wear an ASTM/SEI certified helmet, which may be borrowed from the Held Center. Appropriate attire and footwear are required for lessons. (Course fee.) Staff.

124 Riding—Western (1/4)
Western riding skills, with a strong emphasis on safety and confidence-building in the saddle. Students are assessed on their first day to determine their experience and ability. Western riding lessons are taught off-campus. Students are responsible for their own transportation to/from the lesson facility. Students ride school horses owned by the facility. Appropriate attire and footwear are required for lessons. Rules of the facility must be adhered to by all riders. (Course fee.) Staff.

131 Scuba (1/4)
The development of skills, knowledge and activity for certification in scuba. (Course fee.) Staff.

141 Aquatics (1/4)
Beginner through advanced levels of swimming and or diving. Staff.

147 Body Building and Development (1/4)
Prescribed and therapeutic exercises designed to develop the body to a high degree of physical efficiency. Staff.

152 Meditation (1/4)
Explores a variety of meditation and mindful practices designed to offer a way of dealing with stress and build a foundation for understanding the inner self to maintain balance and offer new possibilities of being in the world. Staff.

153 Yoga I (1/4)
Introduces the use of yoga for health. Emphasizes the physical aspects of the practice through stretching and strengthening the muscles, joints, and spine, and directing blood and oxygen to the internal organs. Staff.

154 Pilates I (1/4)
An introduction to this wellness program based on the use of breathing techniques, concentration, body control, self-centering, precision movements and flow. Staff.

156 Yoga II (1/4)
Prerequisite: Physical Education 153 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of Physical Education 153. Staff.

157 Pilates II (1/4)
Prerequisite: Physical Education 154 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of Physical Education 154. Staff.

158 Disc Golf (1/4)
An introduction to the skills, equipment, rules and strategies for playing disc golf. Staff.

163 Racquetball (1/4)
Basic strokes, rules, equipment, game tactics and strategy. The history and traditions of racquetball. Eye protection and playing equipment not provided. Staff.

165 Badminton and Tennis (1/4)
The development of badminton and tennis skills, strokes, principles and strategies. Staff.

166 Beginning Tennis (1/4)
The development of tennis skills, strokes, principles and strategies. Staff.

167 Beginning Golf (1/4)
The development of basic golf skills, knowledge and strategies. Staff.

168 Intermediate Golf (1/4)
Staff.

169 Intermediate Tennis (1/4)
The development of stroke consistency, shot direction, and singles and doubles strategy. Staff.

170 Advanced Tennis (1/4)
Prerequisite: Physical Education 169 or permission of instructor.
Repetition of strokes, charting, match play, percentage play, singles strategy, doubles strategy, tournament play, conditioning and sportsmanship. Staff.

172 Bowling (1/4)
The development of basic bowling skills. Bowling fees will be charged. May.

178 Canoeing (1/4)
Recreational and racing canoe skills, terminology and river reading. Class meets first eight weeks. (Course fee.) Staff.

181, 182 Life Guarding (1/4, 1/2)
Prerequisite: American Red Cross swimmer or equivalent.
American Red Cross certification in CPR, standard first aid and lifeguarding can be earned. (Course fee.) Staff.

192 Cardiovascular Conditioning (1/4)
Various motor activities are used to stress the cardiovascular system. Designed to strengthen and improve the efficiency and endurance of the cardiovascular system. Appropriate shoes required. Staff.

Faculty

Bindu Madhok, chair and professor.
B.A., 1983, University of Calcutta; Ph.D., 1990, Brown University. Appointed 1990.

Jeremy S. Kirby, associate professor.
B.A., 1999, M.A., 2000, University of Utah; M.A., 2004, Ph.D., 2005, Florida State University. Appointed 2006.

Daniel M. Mittag, associate professor.
B.A., 1995, Drake University; M.A., 1998, Texas A&M University; M.A., 2003, Ph.D., 2009, University of Rochester. Appointed 2007.

Introduction

Historically, philosophy is at the center of the liberal arts tradition. The very concept of an Academy that combines the freedom to inquire with the responsibility to clarify and solve social problems is the invention of classical Greek philosophers.

By subject matter, philosophy is one of the humanities, and studies the concepts we have developed in order to understand the world in which we find ourselves and express what we have discovered. It critically examines our basic assumptions about the world and human relationships.

But philosophy retains a methodological kinship with the sciences, whose methods developed out of general philosophical inquiry. Critical thinking is the hallmark of philosophy courses that bring clarity, precision, and logically rigorous argument to controversial questions about what is real, knowable and valuable. The development of this critical perspective, an appreciation of inquiry and the values that underlie it, is the heart of philosophy.

Philosophy Department Website

Career Opportunities

Analysis of arguments, clear and precise expression of one's views—particularly in writing—and the ability to comprehend complex systems of thought are skills cultivated by philosophy courses that are useful in all areas of life. But our students find their philosophy background particularly useful in the professions. Pre-law students take Logic and Critical Reasoning (107) to prepare for the LSAT and sharpen their analytical skills for law school, while Philosophical Issues in the Law (335) is a critical examination of important legal concepts and institutions. Students preparing for medical school, dental school or the allied health professions discover that Biomedical Ethics (308) examines moral problems raised by advancements in medical research and technology that they will soon face. Ethics (201), Social Philosophy (202), Contemporary Moral Problems (206), Leadership Ethics (302), Ethics and Public Policy (304) and International Ethics and Global Development (309) are useful for students interested in public policy. Business Ethics (303) examines moral problems posed by corporate conduct, e.g., profit-maximization vs. social responsibility, deception vs. honesty in advertising, preferential hiring vs. reverse discrimination. Students pursuing careers in the environmental sciences find Environmental Ethics (301) to be particularly useful in acquiring an understanding of underlying value-frameworks in environmental theories and practices. Philosophy and History of Science (220), Neuroscience and Ethics (306) and Philosophy of Mind (318) are of great value to students pursuing careers in neuroscience.

The critical skills and sense of intellectual heritage that follow the study of philosophy are not only useful in finding a job, but they foster maturity of judgment, personal growth and lifelong learning.

Special Features

Because philosophy studies the systems of ideas we have developed to understand the world and our place in it, philosophy courses often explore the conceptual foundations of other disciplines; e.g., Philosophy and History of Science (220) explores the basic concepts and underlying logic of scientific method, Philosophy of Art (215) is an analysis of theories of the arts and art criticism and often includes field trips to major galleries, and Philosophy of Mind (318) examines theories that attempt to explain consciousness. These natural affinities make double majors attractive, and they are encouraged by the department.

Philosophy students can get to know one another outside of class as members of the Philosophy Club or as members of the national philosophy honorary, Phi Sigma Tau. Members of the honorary have brought distinguished philosophers to campus for lectures and discussion including Paul Churchland, Fred Dretske, David Lewis and Martha Nussbaum.

Philosophy majors are encouraged to write a senior thesis and submit it for departmental honors. Successful completion of this research project results in graduation with departmental honors in philosophy. The Padgett Prize in Philosophy, established in honor of Professor Emeritus Jack F. Padgett, is given annually to the outstanding senior philosophy major.

The Ned S. Garvin Scholarship in Philosophy, established in memory of Professor Ned Garvin, is given annually to the outstanding rising junior philosophy major.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major

  • A minimum of eight units in philosophy.
  • At least three of these eight units must be at the 300- or 400-level.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade and cannot be taken credit/no credit. Directed studies may be counted only by permission of the department.

Requirements for Minor

  • Five units in philosophy, at least two of which must be at the 300- or 400-level.

Requirements for Minor in History of Philosophy

  • Five units, including Philosophy 211 and 212, and three courses at the 289-level or higher selected from the following: Continental Philosophy (289), Sources of Evil (289), Nineteenth Century Philosophy (381), Kierkegaard and Nietzsche (401), History of Philosophy (402), directed study with departmental approval (411). History 102, English 261, Political Science 355 and Religious Studies 231 may be substituted for one of the above electives in consultation with the Philosophy Department.

Requirements for Minor in Philosophy of Mind

  • Five units, at least one of which must be at the 300-level or higher, including either Philosophy of Mind (381/401) or Sensation, Perception and Knowledge (382), and any four of the following: Knowledge, Truth and Reason (315), Modern Philosophy (212), Philosophy East and West (102), Neuroscience I (NEUR 241), Neuroscience and Ethics (306). Psychology 343, 345, 348 or 378 may be substituted for one of the above electives in consultation with the Philosophy Department.

Requirements for Minor in Value Theory

  • Five units, at least two of which must be at the 300-level or higher, selected from the following: Ethics (201), Social Philosophy (202), Contemporary Moral Problems (206), Philosophy of Art (215), Environmental Ethics (301), Business Ethics (303), Ethics and Public Policy (304), Biomedical Ethics (308), Philosophy of Law (335), Theory of Justice (381/401), Leadership Ethics (302), Morality, Truth and Relativism (381/401), Neuroscience and Ethics (306).

Preparation for Graduate Study

  • We recommend that students plan their schedules in consultation with a Philosophy Department faculty member.
  • We recommend that students take more than eight philosophy courses.
  • The following courses are strongly recommended for graduate study: 201, 207, 211, 212, 214, 310, 315.
  • We recommend that students submit a thesis for departmental honors.
  • We recommend that students discuss the graduate school application process with the department during the spring of their junior year.

Philosophy Courses

101 Introduction to Philosophy (1)
A study of the basic methods, controversial problems and philosophical systems, with special consideration given to the relation of philosophy to other disciplines. Because of the central role of argument and evidence in philosophical inquiry, this course is an introduction to conceptual clarification, logical analysis and general critical thinking. Examines topics such as knowledge and skepticism, the mind-body problem, personal identity, moral relativism, moral responsibility, free will and determinism, power, social justice, racism, sexism, violence, war, the existence of God, the existence of theoretical entities. Kirby, Mittag.

102 Philosophy East and West (1)
Compares different schools of eastern philosophy with those of western philosophy in their approaches to important epistemological, metaphysical and ethical issues. These issues include, for example, the nature of the self and its relation to the external world; personal identity; and determinism, free will and moral responsibility. Covers similarities and differences in the philosophical questions asked, arguments given and methodologies adopted by both eastern and western philosophers. Madhok.

107 Logic and Critical Reasoning (1)
A study of the basic conceptual tools used to recognize, evaluate and express arguments. Designed for the student who wishes to reason more effectively and critically. Topics: inductive and deductive standards, truth, validity, fallacies, paradoxes, regresses, counterexamples, analogies, reductios, definitions, sophistries. Mittag.

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

201 Ethics (1)
An examination and evaluation of the major ethical theories, both classical and contemporary, and the application of these theories to a current moral problem. Madhok.

202 Social Philosophy (1)
An issues and historically oriented introduction to a broad range of philosophical subject matter and methodologies through a clarification and analysis of argumentation used to justify selected social and political institutions and practices—e.g., individual liberties, properties of personhood, the nature of the state, obligations and rights, etc. Staff.

206 Contemporary Moral Problems (1)
An introduction to a broad range of philosophical subjects and methodologies through an examination and analysis of contemporary moral problems—e.g., abortion, euthanasia, genetic engineering, sexual morality, gender and racial discrimination, corporate crime, pornography and censorship, the death penalty, ecology, world hunger, etc. Madhok.

207 Symbolic Logic (1)
A study of the formal conceptual tools used by modern deductive logic to express and evaluate arguments. Emphasizes the use of propositional and quantifier logic to clarify and evaluate arguments. Mittag.

211 Ancient Philosophy (1)
A survey of the beginnings of western philosophical thought focusing on the writings of the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle and others. Kirby.

212 Modern Philosophy (1)
Philosophical thought in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, focusing on the writings of such philosophers as Descartes, Leibnitz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard and Nietzsche. Kirby.

214 Twentieth Century Philosophy (1)
Major movements in and methods of contemporary philosophical thinking with special attention to the analytic and existential thinkers. Offered in alternate years. Kirby.

220 Philosophy and History of Science (1)
Considers the following questions: What is science? What is scientific explanation? What are the ontological commitments of a scientist? To what extent does the culture of a scientific community affect results of that community? Kirby.

234 Philosophy of Religion (1)
Same as Religion 234. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 Environmental Ethics (1)
Examines theoretical and practical perspectives on ethical issues in relation to the environment. The theoretical issues range from whether we should assign moral value to species other than the human (and if so, on the basis of what criteria) to whether we have moral obligations to preserve the environment for future generations (and if so, what this would imply for the present generations). The practical issues range from creating incentives for restricting population growth without abdicating responsibilities toward the world's hungry, to the issue of what short-and long-term policies and practices need to be adopted to deal effectively with reducing pollution and hazardous waste while working toward a recycling, sustainable global society. Madhok.

302 Leadership Ethics (1)
Examines the ethical foundations of leadership. Involves an in-depth discussion of foremost leadership theories and their applications to different contexts; critically examines the morally distinct aspects of leadership by looking at the relationships among power, self-interest, and morality; and analyzes leadership from within the ethical frameworks of virtue, duty, and utility along with discussing the ethical challenges of diversity (culture relativism, race, and gender) to traditional leadership ethics. Madhok.

303 Business Ethics (1)
An examination of selected moral problems posed by corporate conduct—e.g., profit-maximization vs. social responsibility, corporate crime and the criminal justice system, business vs. environmental concerns, preferential hiring vs. reverse discrimination, employee autonomy vs. corporate loyalty, deception vs. honesty in advertising, corporate vs. government regulation. Clarification and critical examination of different ethical perspectives for resolving these moral dilemmas. Madhok.

304 Ethics and Public Policy (1)
Emphasizes the ethical foundations of public policy. Rights, obligations, justice, autonomy, the nature of the good life: should these play a role in determining public policy, and if so, how? Focuses on the interaction between ethical values and public policy in areas such as health care, law, government, foreign policy, citizenship, education and media. Madhok.

306 Neuroscience and Ethics (1)
An introduction to the dialogue that has developed between cognitive neuroscientists and moral philosophers. Cognitive neuroscience brings to the study of ethics an interest in the way the brain processes information and in the kinds of brain states that subserve thought and action—in short, it is answering the question of what kind of information-processing creatures we are. Madhok.

308 Biomedical Ethics (1)
The application of major ethical theories to some of the moral problems raised by recent developments in medical technology. Does increased medical knowledge (the end) justify experimentation with human subjects (the means)? How much should a patient be told and who decides? Do parents have the right to give birth to a defective infant and thereby apparently pollute the gene pool? To whom is the genetic counselor responsible—fetus, parent, future generations? Is there a right to die? Who should be the ultimate decision-maker—physician, patient, pastor? Is health care a right or a privilege? In answering these dilemmas, are there any moral rules to follow or does each person decide what is best in the situation? Madhok.

309 International Ethics and Global Development (1)
Explores the ethics of development in an international context. What should development be? Who should play a role in bringing about development? Examines multiple answers to these questions via an understanding of global development ethical theories and approaches such as the basic human needs approach, the human rights approach, the theory of development as freedom, the capabilities approach, theories of justice, as well as utilitarianism and deontological approaches. Applies these development ethics frameworks to important international issues such as poverty, gender inequality, violence and insecurity, over-consumption and globalization. Includes discussion of issues of ethical objectivism versus subjectivism, and ethical pluralism versus relativism. Madhok.

310 Metaphysics (1)
Explores what kinds of things exist. Do abstract entities exist? Is there such a thing as free agency in a world that is deterministic (or, for that matter, in a world that is not deterministic)? Is time something that is mind-dependent or mind-independent? Are we committed to the existence of electrons? Is causation anything above and beyond regularity? Kirby.

315 Knowledge, Truth and Reason (1)
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy.
A critical examination of recent work in the theory of knowledge, i.e., of classic contemporary papers on skepticism, knowledge and the justification of belief. Mittag.

318 Philosophy of Mind (1)
An introduction to the philosophy of mind. Explores the relation of the mind to the physical world and evaluates prominent competing theories about the nature of the mind, including the identity theory, dualism, behaviorism, functionalism and eliminative materialism. Also covers artificial intelligence, phenomenal consciousness, the adequacy of folk psychological explanation and theories of mental content. Mittag.

325 Philosophy of Language (1)
Words and sentences of a language have meanings, thereby allowing us to use sentences to communicate our thoughts, some of which are true. But how do words and sentences get their referents and meanings? What are meanings? This course focuses on central developments in the philosophy of language throughout the twentieth century. Topics include theories of meaning and reference, speech acts, pragmatics, and conversational implicature. Mittag.

335 Philosophical Issues in the Law (1)
Designed both for students interested in philosophy and for those interested in political science, history, economics, or sociology. Provides an explanation of legal concepts and institutions from the philosophical perspective. Develops in the student: (1) an understanding of some of the major philosophical issues in the law and (2) the ability to reflect critically upon them. Madhok.

380 Aristotle: A Western Foundation (1)
Considers how Aristotle's philosophy continues to exercise influence today, especially concerning controversies over the nature of existence, identity, the soul and the way one should live. Explores and evaluates the arguments of a philosopher who was the finest pupil in Plato's Academy, the personal instructor of Alexander the Great, and the founder of the Lyceum. Kirby.

381, 382 Readings in Philosophy (1 each)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Recommended for advanced students.
Careful and critical study of one or more of the outstanding works in philosophy. Staff.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Recommended for advanced students.
Topics of special interest including "Justice," "Metaphysics," "Moral Realism," "Russell." Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Staff.

Faculty

Kenneth J. Saville, chair and professor.
B.S., 1985, Western Michigan University; Ph.D., 1992, Syracuse University. Appointed 1995.

Roger J. Albertson, associate professor.
B.S., 1997, University of Colorado at Denver; Ph.D., 2003, University of Oregon. Appointed 2008.

E. Dale Kennedy, professor.
B.A., 1975, College of Wooster; M.A., 1979, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ph.D., 1989, Rutgers University. Appointed 1994.

Sheila Lyons-Sobaski, associate professor.
B.S., 1989, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; M.S., 1994, Kansas State University; Ph.D., 2003, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Appointed 2005.

Ola Olapade, associate professor.
B.Sc., 1990, M.Sc., 1995, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); M.S., 1998, Millersville University; Ph.D., 2004, Kent State University. Appointed 2006.

Bradley J. Rabquer, assistant professor.
B.S., 2001, Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., 2006, University of Toledo. Appointed 2011.

Ruth E. Schmitter, professor.
B.S., 1964, Michigan State University; M.Sc., 1966, University of Edinburgh; Ph.D., 1973, Harvard University. Appointed 1982.

J. Dan Skean, Jr., professor.
B.S., 1980, Western Kentucky University; M.S., 1982, North Carolina State University; Ph.D., 1989, University of Florida. Appointed 1988.

Douglas W. White, adjunct assistant professor.
B.S., 1976, Pennsylvania State University; M.S., 1978, University of Tennessee; Ph.D., 1989, Rutgers University. Appointed 1995.

Introduction

The Biology Department's mission is to provide students with an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the living world, including the fundamental mechanisms that underlie all life. Students should understand the ways in which they are affected by living organisms and how their lives in turn have an impact on other living organisms and the biosphere. They should become proficient in the methods of science and aware of the processes that lead to discoveries in science. In course work, they should develop observational, analytical and communication skills, regardless of their chosen career path. Ultimately, biology is best understood by active involvement with organisms and the systems of life in laboratory and field settings, and in collaborative student-faculty research.

Biology Department Website

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