Introduction

International studies is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary program that encourages students to examine cross-cultural, cross-national or transnational phenomena. It seeks therefore both a depth and breadth of knowledge about the human experience. Its primary justification arises from the belief that the world is increasingly interdependent and that many of the challenges to humanity are global in scope and cannot be usefully studied within the confines of a single discipline.

Students completing the international studies major at Albion College will have acquired a solid grasp of social, political, economic and historical forces at work in the world; competence in a second language equivalent to four semesters of college-level work; a familiarity with methodologies appropriate to the study of international phenomena; and a globally relevant experience through an appropriate off-campus program. For further information, contact Midori Yoshii, adviser.

International Studies Website

International Studies Courses

130 Introduction to International Studies (1)
Introduces concepts of international studies with historical examples. Students are required to observe and analyze developments within a certain region, area, country or organization throughout the semester. Yoshii.

260 An International History of the Cold War (1)
Interprets the Cold War from international perspectives through analyzing the roles of proxy wars in Asia and the anti-colonial movement of the Third World, which defies the conventional analytical framework of the U.S.-Soviet conflicts. Includes study of the official documents of various governments (in English translation) and analyses of the contemporary media coverage and film analysis. Same as History 260. Yoshii.

264 An International History of Modern Japan (1)
Surveys the history of Japan from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century, with special emphasis on how cultural, military, political, and economic interactions with other countries have influenced Japan’s national policies and cultural identity over time. Topics range from historical relations with China and Korea, the influence of seventeenth century “Dutch learning,” U.S., European, and Russian imperialism in the nineteenth century, Japanese expansion into Asia during the early twentieth century, U.S.-Japan relations during and after World War II, and immigration and population in the twenty-first century. Same as History 264. Yoshii.

300 Power and Culture in the Asia-Pacific Region (1)
Introduces the diversity and development of the Asia-Pacific region that includes countries with traditions of Confucianism, Marxist-Leninist ideology, Western liberalism and Islam. Begins with a historical survey of the political, economic and social development of the region, followed by students' discussions of the prospect of the Asia-Pacific region growing into something similar to the European Community. Special attention is paid to the role of the U.S., an Asia-Pacific country, in this region. Yoshii.

370 Building on International and Intercultural Experiences (1)
Designed for students (including international students at Albion College) who wish to integrate their experiences studying, working or living abroad with a deepened analytical understanding of international and intercultural issues. Students familiarize themselves with the most current scholarship on international studies. Through independent research, they advance their understanding of a particular international issue of their choice and hone their abilities to articulate this issue to an audience. Yoshii.

Special Studies

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other studies. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. May be taken more than once for credit. Staff.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Staff.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major

A minimum of eight units as follows:

1. Three international studies core courses consisting of International Studies 130 and two additional courses, one of which must be at the 200-level or higher. The two additional international studies core courses must be taken in two different departments. A current list of pre-approved IS core courses is available on the International Studies Program Web site or from the International Studies Program Committee chair.

2. Elective courses constituting a curricular focus. Electives must be taken in at least two different departments. A list of sample elective courses is available on the International Studies Program Web site or from the International Studies Program Committee chair. The number of courses that a student takes depends on the track chosen and the number of units elected for the capstone project. Students may choose from the following options:

Area Studies--At least three units of course work in one of the following areas: Europe, Africa, Asia or Latin America. Depending on course availability, students may pursue other area studies tracks with the prior approval of the International Studies Program Committee. Modern language competence must be in a language related to the area studies focus. The semester abroad must be in a location related to the area studies focus.

Transnational Studies--At least four units of course work on a specific transnational topic. Pre-approved tracks include international environmental studies and international gender studies. Depending on course availability, students may pursue other transnational studies tracks with the prior approval of the International Studies Program Committee.

3. International Studies 370: Building on International and Intercultural Experiences.

Additional Major Requirements

  • Course work must include at least two courses taken at the 300-level or higher. No more than three units of 100-level work may be counted toward the major.
  • Up to three units of course work may be taken abroad.
  • Proof of modern language competence equivalent to two years of college-level language study is required.
  • At least one semester abroad must be completed in an off-campus study program approved for Albion College credit. In special circumstances, students may petition the International Studies Program Committee to fulfill this requirement through U.S.-based off-campus study programs with significant international content.

Requirements for Minor in Area Studies

  • Five units as follows: International Studies 130, plus four courses on a specified geographical region (Europe, Africa, Asia or Latin America). Depending on course availability, students may pursue other area studies tracks with the prior approval of the International Studies Program Committee. Area studies courses shall be distributed across at least two departments, with at least three courses at the 200-level or higher.
  • All courses must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.
  • No more than two transfer credits will be accepted.
  • Cognate requirements: Knowledge of a second language, equivalent to at least two years of college-level study (students may fulfill through course work or placement test). The language must be a language of the region under study.

Requirements for Minor in Transnational Studies

  • Five units as follows: International Studies 130, plus four international studies core courses, of which three must be at the 200-level or above. These must also be distributed across at least two departments.
  • All courses must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.
  • No more than two transfer credits will be accepted.
  • Cognate requirements: Knowledge of a second language, equivalent to at least two years of college-level study (students may fulfill through course work or placement test).

Faculty

Emmanuel Yewah, program chair, professor of French and Howard L. McGregor Endowed Professor of Humanities.
Licencié-es-Lettres, 1978, Maiîtrise, 1979, Université de Yaoundé; M.A., 1982, Ph.D., 1987, University of Michigan. Appointed 1986.

Midori Yoshii, associate professor of international studies.
B.A., 1986, M.A., 1988, Tsuda College Tokyo; M.A., 1991, Ph.D., 2003, Boston University. Appointed 2004.