Kinesiology Courses

187, 188, 189 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

194 Introduction to Clinical Laboratories (1/2)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the athletic training major or permission of instructor.
The theory behind basic athletic training practices and the application of the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

200 Medical Terminology (1/2)
Focuses on the language of medicine—the prefixes, suffixes, word roots and their combining forms—by review of each system of the body. Emphasizes word construction, spelling, usage, comprehension and pronunciation. Introduces students to anatomy and physiology, pathology, diagnostic/surgical procedures, pharmacology and medical abbreviations. Betz, C. Moss.

201 Foundations of Healthful Living (1)
An in-depth presentation of crucial health issues emphasizing the need and effect of exercise and physical activity on the body. Included are units on the cardiovascular system, the muscular system, nutrition, diet, weight control, drugs, fitness and physical profiles, plus individualized exercise and activity programs. Lecture and laboratory. Staff.

203 First Aid (1/2)
Basic and advanced course work and skills in the following areas: CPR, first aid, automated external defibrillator, emergency and non-emergency management of injuries and illnesses and professional rescuer skills. American Red Cross certificates may be earned in each area. Required for the students enrolled in the teacher education program, health minor and athletic training major. Staff.

205 Water Safety Instructor (1/2)
Prerequisite: Current Red Cross Emergency Water Safety Skills and Swimmer Skills.
Designed for students who seek professional insights into teaching and administering aquatic programs, and community swimming programs. The American Red Cross water safety instructor's certificate may be earned. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

207 Introduction to Kinesiology (1)
An introduction to the interdisciplinary approach to the science and study of human movement. Provides an orientation to various educational pathways, requirements and career opportunities in kinesiology in the areas of teaching, coaching, therapeutic exercise, fitness and health, and sport management professions. Includes basic concepts of the kinesiology discipline and an overview of the relevance of foundational sub-disciplines. Addresses issues, challenges and current/future trends. Exercise science majors must take this course for a numerical grade. Betz, C. Moss.

211 Human Systems Anatomy (1)
Emphasizes the body systems most involved with human movement, sport and exercise (e.g., skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, nervous and respiratory). Provides basic information on systems considered less important to human movement (e.g., integumentary, lymphatic, urinary, digestive and endocrine). Betz, R. Moss.

213 Athletic Injuries Prevention and Treatment (1)
An overview of athletic training and its role as an allied health profession: the history and evolution of athletic training, basic sports-related injury prevention and assessment procedures, rehabilitation techniques, therapeutic modalities and athletic training management and administration. Development of hands-on skills, such as taping, basic rehabilitation and modality implementation, in lecture and laboratory sessions. Staff.

233 Human Gross Anatomy (1)
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 211.
The basic musculoskeletal anatomical concepts related to the human body. Emphasizes applications to physical activity and musculoskeletal injury. Lecture and laboratory (cadaver). R. Moss.

240 Sports Nutrition (1/2)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Introduction to nutrition as the study of foods and their effects upon health, development and performance of the individual. Emphasizes the role nutrition plays in the improvement of athletic performance and the physiological processes of nutrient utilization by the human body. Staff.

243 Athletic Injury Assessment Techniques (1)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 233, acceptance into the athletic training major or permission of instructor.
The anatomical and physiological foundation necessary to assess the physically active individual. Strategies used for systematic and thorough evaluation, and referral procedures used following assessment to ensure a continuum of care. C. Moss.

244 Lower Extremity Assessment (1)
Designed to provide the anatomical and physiological foundation necessary to perform and understand the assessment of lower extremity pathology in physically active individuals. Utilizes specific evaluation strategies to develop a plan for systematic and thorough evaluation. Stresses appreciation of the referral procedures following assessment to ensure a continuum of care. May not be taken credit/no credit. C. Moss.

253 Therapeutic Rehabilitation and Modalities I (1)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 233, acceptance into the athletic training major or permission of instructor.
The basic concepts related to the modality use and rehabilitation concepts of the physically active individual: modality selection, pharmacological considerations, record-keeping, program design and implementation, and safety. The psychology of rehabilitation, including goal-setting and motivation. Clinical application of rehabilitation techniques, including strategies for proper exercise selection based on anatomical and physiological considerations, program administration, and guidelines for program progression. C. Moss.

254 Therapeutic Rehabilitation (1)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into athletic training major and Kinesiology 233, or special permission by ATEP program director or instructor.
Provides the foundational components necessary to understand and perform appropriate therapeutic rehabilitation methods for physically active individuals. Specific strategies are utilized to develop and plan systematic and thorough rehabilitation protocols. Current literature and techniques in the field support the course content. C. Moss.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

290 Clinical Experience I (1/4)
Presents the theory behind introductory athletic training practices and the clinical applications of these practices. Develops proficiency in the application of the specific competencies in supervised clinical situations. May not be taken credit/no credit. Staff.

293 Clinical Laboratory in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the athletic training major.
The theory behind introductory athletic training practices and the clinical applications of these practices. Development of proficiency in the application of the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

294 Clinical Laboratory II in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the athletic training major.
The theory behind basic athletic training practices and clinical applications. Development of proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

295 Clinical Rehabilitation (1/4)
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Kinesiology 254.
Presents the theory behind upper extremity athletic training practices and clinical applications, as well as developing proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. C. Moss.

310 Research and Statistics in Kinesiology (1)
Qualitative and quantitative research approaches specific to the various disciplinary areas in kinesiology. Topics include research ethics; selecting and developing a research problem; reviewing the literature, developing research hypotheses, writing research proposals; issues in measurement, data collection issues; statistical analyses; and communicating the results of research. Betz.

342 Advanced Techniques in Athletic Training (1)
Prerequiste: Kinesiology 253.
Advanced rehabilitative and modality techniques including modality selection, application and safety criteria for the care of the physically active, including gait and orthotic evaluation and fitting, electrical stimulation, manual therapy techniques, and corrective exercises in rehabilitation. C.Moss.

344 Upper Extremity Assessment (1)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into athletic training major, Kinesiology 233, or special permission by ATEP director or instructor.
Provides the anatomical and physiological foundation necessary to perform and understand the assessment of upper extremity pathology in the physically active individual. Specific evaluation strategies are utilized to develop a plan for a systematic and thorough evaluation. Appreciation of the referral procedures following assessment are stressed to ensure a continuum of care. Current literature and techniques in the field support the course content. C. Moss.

353 Athletic Training Administration (1/2)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 213, acceptance into the athletic training major.
The administrative issues of athletic training: basic management theory and the medical model relative to various athletic training settings; human resources, facilities and budget, insurance, information management and research; practice requirements and documents in the athletic training profession. Staff.

354 Therapeutic Modalities (1)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into athletic training major and Kinesiology 233, or special permission by ATEP program director or instructor.
Provides the foundational components necessary to understand and utilize appropriate modalities for physically active individuals. Specific strategies are utilized to develop and plan systematic and thorough modality protocols. Current literature and techniques in the field support the course content. C. Moss.

368 Kinesiology and Biomechanics (1)
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 233.
Applies anatomical knowledge and mechanical principles to skills in motor activity, exercise, sport and daily activities. R. Moss.

369 Human Physiology (1)
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 211.
An introduction to the study of the physiological phenomena presented by the human body. Focuses on the function of organs and organ systems and includes practical applications in kinesiology and the care and prevention of athletic injuries. Betz.

379 Exercise Physiology (1)
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 369 or permission of instructor.
An examination of the mechanisms and processes by which the body performs its various functions. Emphasis on cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and nervous systems as they relate to physical activity. Betz.

381 Foundations of Exercise Testing and Prescription (1)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 240, 368, 379.
Provides the knowledge and tools to properly conduct various aspects of exercise testing such as the assessment of risk stratification, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, body composition and flexibility. Applies these assessments in development of exercise programs and prescriptions for both a general health and fitness population and a clinical population. Emphasizes the American College of Sports Medicine’s guidelines for exercise testing and prescription with specific focus on the knowledge, skills and abilities for the Health Fitness Specialist Certification. Betz.

382 Advanced Exercise Testing and Prescription (1)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 240, 368, 379.
Further exploration of the various aspects of exercise testing and prescription, such as risk stratification, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, and flexibility, but with a focus on an athletic population. Covers the physiological mechanisms associated with anaerobic and aerobic conditioning, and muscular and cardiovascular evaluation and conditioning. Betz.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

390 Clinical Experience III (1/4)
Presents the theory behind intermediate athletic training practices and clinical applications. Develops proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. May not be taken credit/no credit. Offered every other fall. Staff.

391, 392 Internship (1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of department.
Offered on a credit/no credit basis. Staff.

393 Clinical Laboratory III in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 213, acceptance into the athletic training major.
Presents the theory behind intermediate athletic training practices and clinical applications. Develops proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

394 Clinical Laboratory IV in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 213, acceptance into the athletic training major.
The theory behind intermediate athletic training practices and clinical applications. Development of proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

395 Clinical Experience IV (1/4)
The theory behind basic athletic training practices and the use of clinical modalities. Development of proficiency in the specified competencies in supervised clinical situations. Staff.

401 Athletic Training Senior Seminar (1/2)
Prerequisite: Senior status in the athletic training major.
Current and advanced topics in athletic training. Includes fall semester clinical component. Staff.

402 Seminar (1)
Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1)
Staff.

453 Medical Conditions in Athletic Training (1/2)
Prerequisites: Kinesiology 213, acceptance into the athletic training major.
Interactions with medical and allied health care professionals in the field to develop an understanding of pathologies and the pharmacological treatment of pathologies common in physically active individuals. Basic principles, ethical and legal issues of pharmacology and precautions, and the policies and procedures of storing and documenting pharmaceuticals in an allied health care setting. Staff.

494 Colloquium in Athletic Training (1/4)
Prerequisite: Senior status in the athletic training major.
A case study approach to injuries as seen by students in the field. Includes spring semester clinical component. C. Moss.

Wellness Courses

A maximum of four activity courses (100 level, 1/4 unit) in physical education and theatre (dance) may be used toward completing the 32 units required for graduation.

123 Riding—English (1/4)
English riding skills, with a strong emphasis on safety and confidence-building in the saddle. Students are assessed on their first day to determine their experience and ability. Students may ride their own horse or use a school horse. Riders must wear an ASTM/SEI certified helmet, which may be borrowed from the Held Center. Appropriate attire and footwear are required for lessons. (Course fee.) Staff.

124 Riding—Western (1/4)
Western riding skills, with a strong emphasis on safety and confidence-building in the saddle. Students are assessed on their first day to determine their experience and ability. Western riding lessons are taught off-campus. Students are responsible for their own transportation to/from the lesson facility. Students ride school horses owned by the facility. Appropriate attire and footwear are required for lessons. Rules of the facility must be adhered to by all riders. (Course fee.) Staff.

131 Scuba (1/4)
The development of skills, knowledge and activity for certification in scuba. (Course fee.) Staff.

141 Aquatics (1/4)
Beginner through advanced levels of swimming and or diving. Staff.

147 Body Building and Development (1/4)
Prescribed and therapeutic exercises designed to develop the body to a high degree of physical efficiency. Staff.

152 Meditation (1/4)
Explores a variety of meditation and mindful practices designed to offer a way of dealing with stress and build a foundation for understanding the inner self to maintain balance and offer new possibilities of being in the world. Staff.

153 Yoga I (1/4)
Introduces the use of yoga for health. Emphasizes the physical aspects of the practice through stretching and strengthening the muscles, joints, and spine, and directing blood and oxygen to the internal organs. Staff.

154 Pilates I (1/4)
An introduction to this wellness program based on the use of breathing techniques, concentration, body control, self-centering, precision movements and flow. Staff.

156 Yoga II (1/4)
Prerequisite: Physical Education 153 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of Physical Education 153. Staff.

157 Pilates II (1/4)
Prerequisite: Physical Education 154 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of Physical Education 154. Staff.

158 Disc Golf (1/4)
An introduction to the skills, equipment, rules and strategies for playing disc golf. Staff.

163 Racquetball (1/4)
Basic strokes, rules, equipment, game tactics and strategy. The history and traditions of racquetball. Eye protection and playing equipment not provided. Staff.

165 Badminton and Tennis (1/4)
The development of badminton and tennis skills, strokes, principles and strategies. Staff.

166 Beginning Tennis (1/4)
The development of tennis skills, strokes, principles and strategies. Staff.

167 Beginning Golf (1/4)
The development of basic golf skills, knowledge and strategies. Staff.

168 Intermediate Golf (1/4)
Staff.

169 Intermediate Tennis (1/4)
The development of stroke consistency, shot direction, and singles and doubles strategy. Staff.

170 Advanced Tennis (1/4)
Prerequisite: Physical Education 169 or permission of instructor.
Repetition of strokes, charting, match play, percentage play, singles strategy, doubles strategy, tournament play, conditioning and sportsmanship. Staff.

172 Bowling (1/4)
The development of basic bowling skills. Bowling fees will be charged. May.

178 Canoeing (1/4)
Recreational and racing canoe skills, terminology and river reading. Class meets first eight weeks. (Course fee.) Staff.

181, 182 Life Guarding (1/4, 1/2)
Prerequisite: American Red Cross swimmer or equivalent.
American Red Cross certification in CPR, standard first aid and lifeguarding can be earned. (Course fee.) Staff.

192 Cardiovascular Conditioning (1/4)
Various motor activities are used to stress the cardiovascular system. Designed to strengthen and improve the efficiency and endurance of the cardiovascular system. Appropriate shoes required. Staff.

Majors and Minors

Requirements for Major in Athletic Training

Albion College's Athletic Training Education Program has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). As graduates of a CAATE-accredited education program, our students can sit for the national Board of Certification examination.

Students must apply for admission to the athletic training major after enrolling at Albion College. All admission criteria, retention criteria, and required application forms may be obtained from the athletic training program director or by downloading them from the Athletic Training Education Program Web site at http://www.albion.edu/athletictraining. Transfer students must follow all of the admission procedures as outlined in this section. Credit for course work from other institutions will be handled on an individual basis.

Completed application packets are due the Monday after fall break for fall admission and the Monday after spring break for spring admission. The athletic training program can be completed in a minimum of five semesters although this minimum is not encouraged. Students may participate on one athletic team while completing the athletic training major, but those students may be expected to complete some program requirements during the summer, in an extra fall semester, or during their athletic season if appropriate progress is not attained.

  • Students in the athletic training major must complete thirteen and three-quarter units of required and prerequisite course work including the following: Kinesiology 194, 211, 213, 233, 240, 244, 254, 290, 295, 310, 344, 353, 354, 369, 379, 390, 395, 401, 453, and 494.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • The following cognate is required: Psychology 101.
  • Athletic training students must meet a 900-hour clinical requirement over the course of a minimum of five semesters. While students majoring in athletic training may play one sport, these individuals must be aware that attaining the 900-hour clinical requirement is made more difficult because of time spent playing their sport, and they may need to obtain clinical experience in the summer or attend Albion for an extra semester.

Requirements for Major in Exercise Science

  • Ten and one-half units including: Kinesiology 207, 211, 213, 233, 240, 310, 368, 369, 379, 381 and 382.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

Requirements for Minor in Exercise Science

  • Five and one-half units, including: Kinesiology 211, 240, 368, 369, 379 and one of the following: 381 or 382.
  • All courses for the minor must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

Career Opportunities

The athletic training major prepares students to sit for the national Board of Certification examination. Approximately 75 percent of the graduates in this major continue on to get their master's degree and then employment in athletic training, working at colleges, high schools or clinics. Some have pursued doctorates in a related academic discipline. Another 20 percent have pursued degrees in other health fields to become physicians (D.O., M.D.), physician assistants and physical therapists.

The exercise science major has been developed to prepare students for careers in health and wellness including but not limited to personal training and strength and conditioning. Our majors will be prepared to apply to graduate programs in exercise science, physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician assistant. Others may choose to sit for the American College of Sports Medicine certifications as a personal trainer or health fitness specialist. Additionally, students will be prepared to enter into careers in cardiac rehabilitation.

Introduction

A liberal arts education should provide the means to enhance one's mind, body and soul. The Kinesiology Department provides the student with an opportunity to pursue academic disciplines that will enable them and ultimately others to gain knowledge that will positively affect their lives and the lives of those around them. Presenting academic disciplines that result in a physically healthy existence as well as a vigorous intellectual life is the goal of the Kinesiology Department.

Kinesiology Department Website

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