Interdepartmental Majors

Major and Minor (2)

Requirements for Major

Note: Classes in italics are taught during Summer College.

To assist students in their academic planning, see a sample four-year course of study.

A minimum of eight and one-half units including the following:

  • Business 111, Gerstacker Leadership Workshop (1/4 unit)
  • Economics and Management 211, Financial Accounting
  • Intercultural/Global Issues:
    One unit selected from the following:
    Modern Languages and Cultures 105, Intercultural Understanding and Global Issues;
    Economics and Management 362, International Management; French 201, Intermediate French or higher; German 201, Intermediate German or higher; or Spanish 201, Intermediate Spanish or higher
  • Ethics: One unit selected from the following:
    Philosophy 301, Environmental Ethics
    Philosophy 302, Leadership Ethics
    Philosophy 303, Business Ethics
    Philosophy 304, Ethics and Public Policy
    Philosophy 308, Biomedical Ethics
    Philosophy 309, International Ethics and Global Development
  • English 208, Professional Writing
  • Communication Studies 242, Professional Communication
  • Management/Psychology: One unit at the 300-level
  • Economics and Management 357, Business Functions
  • Two one-unit internships:
    Two options are available for fulfilling the internship requirement: (1) two full-time internships or (2) one full-time internship and one off-campus semester in an approved Albion College program
  • Senior Capstone (1/4 unit)
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade, except those offered only on a credit/no credit basis.

The following are required in addition to the major:

  • Statistics:
    Mathematics 209, An Introduction to Statistics; Mathematics 309, Mathematical Statistics; or Economics and Management 235, Economic Statistics (1 unit)
    Or
    Psychology 204, Research Design and Analysis I, and 206, Research Design and Analysis II (2 units)
  • Economics and Management 230, Intermediate Microeconomics or 232, Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • Completion of a second area of specialization selected from these options: (1) an existing Albion College minor, (2) a College-approved emphasis or concentration, (3) a second major, or (4) a five-unit area of focus, determined in collaboration with the Gerstacker Institute director, along with the majority approval of the Gerstacker Internal Advisory Committee and the provost.

Requirements for Minor

A minimum of five and one-quarter to seven units including the following:

Core requirements:

  • Business 111, Gerstacker Leadership Workshop (1/4 unit)
  • Economics and Management 211, Financial Accounting (1 unit)
  • Economics and Management 259, Management/Psychology (1 unit)

Choice of one in each section:

  • English 208, Professional Writing OR Communication Studies 242, Professional Communication
  • Intercultural/Global Issues. One unit selected from the following:
    Modern Languages and Cultures 105, Intercultural Understanding and Global Issues; Economics and Management 362, International Management; French 201, Intermediate French or higher; German 201, Intermediate German or higher; or Spanish 201, Intermediate Spanish or higher

OR

Ethics - One unit selected from the following:
Philosophy 301, Environmental Ethics
Philosophy 302, Leadership Ethics
Philosophy 303, Business Ethics
Philosophy 304, Ethics and Public Policy
Philosophy 308, Biomedical Ethics
Philosophy 309, International Ethics and Global Development

Internship

  • Business and Organizations 392 (1 unit) - Two options:
    1. One full-time internship, or
    2. One off-campus semester in an approved Albion College program that combines course work and an internship

The following are required in addition to the minor:

  • Economics and Management 101, Principles of Microeconomics (1 unit)
  • Statistics:
    Mathematics 209, An Introduction to Statistics; Mathematics 309, Mathematical Statistics; or Economics and Management 235, Economic Statistics (1 unit)
    Or
    Psychology 204, Research Design and Analysis I, and 206, Research Design and Analysis II (2 units)

Area of Focus

Business Communication
Effective communication is the foundation of every effective business. The area of focus in business communication draws from communication studies, management and psychological sciences in order to better equip students with the necessary skills and abilities. Specifically, students will gain a better understanding of communication and associated techniques, human behavior, motivation, and performance, and how to effectively manage the resources of a business (human, financial and physical). Careers individuals pursue with an interest in business communication include public relations/media relations, corporate communications, public affairs, investor relations, government relations, marketing communication, and community relations.

The business communication area of focus is designed around two components: (1) a common core of two fundamental courses, and (2) a variety of courses addressing critical areas of business communication.

Requirements for the area of focus in business communication (5 units) are: Communication Studies 203 and Psychology 236; and three units chosen from the following electives: Communication Studies 205, 303, 306; Economics and Management 358, 359; Psychology 346.

All courses for an area of focus must be taken for a numerical grade.

Japanese Courses

Japanese

101 Elementary Japanese (1)
Stresses the grammatical structures and vocabulary of spoken and written Japanese, and offers practice in conversation and in writing Chinese characters. Also emphasizes Japanese culture and intercultural understanding between Japanese and U.S. cultures. Includes how to interact in a culturally and socially appropriate manner in specific situations. Staff.

102 Elementary Japanese, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Japanese 101 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Japanese 101. Staff.

201 Intermediate Japanese (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Japanese 102 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Japanese 102. Staff.

202 Intermediate Japanese, continued (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Japanese 201 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Japanese 201. Staff.

287, 288, 289 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

301 Upper Intermediate Japanese (1)
Expected level of proficiency: Japanese 202.
Builds a high level of proficiency in Japanese. Emphasizes producing conversation and expanding vocabulary in both speaking and writing. Weekly tutorials on class material and Japanese culture. Staff.

387, 388, 389 Selected Topics (1/4, 1/2, 1)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An examination of subjects or areas not included in other courses. Staff.

Academic Catalogs

The academic catalogs at Albion College are organized by school year and govern the requirements for degrees dictate for the incoming class of students for that year.  

These links below will take you to the catalog of entry for your incoming class:

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Institute core requirements are found in the Departments and Courses section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Foreign Languages, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, Honors

Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

Departmental Majors

Anthropology and Sociology
Art
Art History
Athletic Training
Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
French
Geological Sciences

German
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Spanish
Theatre


Interdepartmental Majors

Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics

 

Interdisciplinary Majors

American Studies
Ethnic Studies
International Studies

Public Policy
Women's and Gender Studies

Individually Designed Majors

Units for Major: 8-10

Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

Anthropology and Sociology
Anthropology, Sociology
Anthropology/Sociology
Art
Art, Art History
Asian Studies
Biology
Cell and Molecular Biology
Environmental Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics and Management
Economics, Management
English
English, Journalism
Foreign Language
French, German,
Spanish
Gender Studies
Geological Sciences
Geology, Environmental
Geology, Geographic
Information Systems,
Paleontology

History
Mathematics
Mathematics,
Applied Mathematics,
Statistics,
Computer Science
Philosophy
Philosophy, History of
Philosophy, Philosophy
of Mind, Value Theory
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Theatre
Dance
Women's Studies

Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations and Institutes are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Mass Communication
Neuroscience
Professional Management
Public Policy and Service

Institutes

Brown Honors Institute
Institute for the Study of the Environment
Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service
Gerstacker Institute for Professional Management
Liberal Arts Institute for Premedical and Health Care Studies
Shurmur Education Institute

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music (including up to four 1/4-unit music ensembles), Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

  • Accounting
  • Anthropology
  • Anthropology and Sociology
  • Art (Studio Art)
  • Art History
  • Athletic Training
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Earth Science
  • Economics and Management
  • English
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Exercise Science
  • Finance
  • French
  • Geological Sciences
  • German
  • History
  • Individually Designed Major
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics/Economics
  • Mathematics/Physics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Policy
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Sustainability Studies
  • Theatre
  • Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

  • Anthropology
    • Anthropology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Art
    • Art, Art History
  • Biology
    • Cell and Molecular Biology
    • Environmental Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Economics and Management
    • Accounting—Corporate Track,
    • Economics, Finance, Management
  • Education
    • Educational Studies
  • English
  • Foreign Language
    • French, German,
    • Spanish
  • Gender Studies
  • Geological Sciences
    • Geology, Environmental
    • Geology, Geographic
    • Information Systems,
    • Paleontology
  • History
  • Mathematics
    • Mathematics,
    • Applied Mathematics,
    • Statistics,
    • Computer Science
  • Philosophy
    • Philosophy, History of
    • Philosophy, Philosophy
    • of Mind, Value Theory
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
    • Sociology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Theatre
  • Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Departments and Courses section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, Honors

Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

Departmental Majors

Anthropology and Sociology
Art
Art History
Athletic Training
Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
Exercise Science
French

Geological Sciences
German
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Spanish
Theatre


Interdepartmental Majors

Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics

 

Interdisciplinary Majors

Ethnic Studies
International Studies

Public Policy
Women's and Gender Studies

Individually Designed Majors

Units for Major: 8-10

Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

Anthropology and Sociology
  Anthropology, Sociology
  Anthropology/Sociology
Art
  Art, Art History
Biology
  Cell and Molecular Biology
  Environmental Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics and Management
  Economics, Management
English
Foreign Language
  French, German,
  Spanish
Gender Studies

Geological Sciences
  Geology, Environmental
  Geology, Geographic
  Information Systems,
  Paleontology
History
Mathematics
  Mathematics,
  Applied Mathematics,
  Statistics,
  Computer Science
Philosophy
  Philosophy, History of
  Philosophy, Philosophy
  of Mind, Value Theory
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Theatre
Women's Studies

Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Professional Management
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Premedical Professions and Health Sciences
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Departments and Courses section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, Honors

Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

Departmental Majors

Anthropology
Art
Art History
Athletic Training
Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
Exercise Science
French
Geological Sciences

German
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre


Interdepartmental Majors

Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics

 

Interdisciplinary Majors

Ethnic Studies
International Studies

Public Policy
Women's and Gender Studies

Individually Designed Majors

Units for Major: 8-10

Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

Anthropology
  Anthropology,
  Anthropology/Sociology
Art
  Art, Art History
Biology
  Cell and Molecular Biology
  Environmental Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics and Management
  Economics, Management
English
Foreign Language
  French, German,
  Spanish
Gender Studies
Geological Sciences
  Geology, Environmental
  Geology, Geographic
  Information Systems,
  Paleontology

History
Mathematics
  Mathematics,
  Applied Mathematics,
  Statistics,
  Computer Science
Philosophy
  Philosophy, History of
  Philosophy, Philosophy
  of Mind, Value Theory
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
  Sociology,
  Anthropology/Sociology
Theatre
Women's Studies

Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Professional Management
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Premedical Professions and Health Sciences
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

Anthropology
Anthropology and Sociology
Art (Studio Art)
Art History
Athletic Training
Biochemistry
Biology
Business and Organizations
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Earth Science
Economics and Management
English
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ethnic Studies
Exercise Science
French
Geological Sciences

German
History
Individually Designed Major
International Studies
Mathematics
Mathematics/Economics
Mathematics/Physics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Public Policy
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Sustainability Studies
Theatre
Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

Anthropology
  Anthropology,
  Anthropology/Sociology
Art
  Art, Art History
Biology
  Cell and Molecular Biology
  Environmental Biology
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics and Management
  Economics, Management
English
Foreign Language
  French, German,
  Spanish
Gender Studies
Geological Sciences
  Geology, Environmental
  Geology, Geographic
  Information Systems,
  Paleontology

History
Mathematics
  Mathematics,
  Applied Mathematics,
  Statistics,
  Computer Science
Philosophy
  Philosophy, History of
  Philosophy, Philosophy
  of Mind, Value Theory
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
  Sociology,
  Anthropology/Sociology
Theatre
Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music (including up to four 1/4-unit music ensembles), Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

  • Accounting
  • Anthropology
  • Anthropology and Sociology
  • Art (Studio Art)
  • Art History
  • Athletic Training
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Earth Science
  • Economics and Management
  • English
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Exercise Science
  • Finance
  • French
  • Geological Sciences
  • German
  • History
  • Individually Designed Major
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics/Economics
  • Mathematics/Physics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Policy
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Sustainability Studies
  • Theatre
  • Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

  • Anthropology
    • Anthropology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Art
    • Art, Art History
  • Biology
    • Cell and Molecular Biology
    • Environmental Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Economics and Management
    • Economics, Management
  • Education
    • Educational Studies
  • English
  • Foreign Language
    • French, German,
    • Spanish
  • Gender Studies
  • Geological Sciences
    • Geology, Environmental
    • Geology, Geographic
    • Information Systems,
    • Paleontology
  • History
  • Mathematics
    • Mathematics,
    • Applied Mathematics,
    • Statistics,
    • Computer Science
  • Philosophy
    • Philosophy, History of
    • Philosophy, Philosophy
    • of Mind, Value Theory
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
    • Sociology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Theatre
  • Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Introduction & Curriculum Overview

At the heart of the Albion Experience is an intellectually stimulating commitment to the liberal arts. Albion's core curriculum is a program of learning that is initiated with the First-Year Seminar and culminates with the conferring of the bachelor's degree. Students begin their academic careers in a First-Year Seminar designed to familiarize them with the liberal arts tradition in an intimate classroom environment that fosters open communication, nurtures critical thinking, and promotes improvement in writing and speaking. Albion is committed to having students complete their undergraduate education with an experience that brings continuity, coherence and focus to their academic course work and that involves the students themselves, soon-to-be graduates, as teachers, facilitators and presenters.

Between the First-Year Seminar and graduation, students complete other core courses: five Modes of Inquiry courses and four category requirements. These courses provide analytic tools for understanding the world, offer rich and complex accounts of social life, encourage examination of these accounts, and contribute to a profound understanding of the interconnectedness of learning and living in a global community. In addition, courses are distributed across the four divisions of the College: fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences. The liberal arts core serves as the impetus and context for lifelong learning, preparing students for the phase after college when they must themselves provide education and expertise as well as continue to learn, collaborate, and facilitate at home, at work, and in a local and global community.

In addition to the core curriculum, all students are required to complete a major, which provides a depth of intellectual study that prepares students for graduate and professional school, as well as for a rich diversity of careers and life experiences. These majors may be a conventional departmental major, a not-so-conventional interdepartmental major or the unconventional individually designed major. A commitment to academic excellence within all academic departments ensures every student that fulfilling the requirements of the major will be a comprehensive and challenging scholarly experience. Other opportunities for in-depth exploration and clustering of courses include minors and concentrations.

Choice characterizes the general education requirements as well as the major. Each Albion student is an adult, capable of making sensible decisions about his or her personal future. But inherent in the right to make decisions is the potential to make mistakes. So Albion College provides assistance to students in planning their education. During their first year at Albion College, academic advisers are assigned to all students to monitor academic progress and help each student begin fulfilling his or her graduation requirements. After the first year, students are free to choose a faculty adviser who will help develop a program of study based on the student's goals. Students who do not meet with their adviser during each semester's academic advising period will not be allowed to register until they have proof of advising.

It is ultimately the student's responsibility to be aware of and fulfill all graduation requirements. To assist students in this endeavor, the Registrar's Office prepares and maintains an audit for each student at the end of the sophomore year. These reports indicate progress toward completing graduation requirements. Students are provided with updated audits prior to each fall semester. Audits are available from the student's adviser or directly through the Registrar's Office.

Curriculum Overview

The primary responsibility for meeting the College's academic requirements rests with each student. This chart serves as a guide to the required and elective courses that fulfill the units needed for graduation. They are explained in greater detail on the following pages. The complete requirements for graduation are outlined in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Core Requirement

I. Liberal Arts 101 (First-Year Seminar; 1 unit)

II. Modes of Inquiry (1 unit in each)

Artistic Creation and Analysis
Historical and Cultural Analysis
Modeling and Analysis
Scientific Analysis
Textual Analysis

III. Category Requirements (1 unit in each)

Environmental Studies
Ethnicity Studies
Gender Studies
Global Studies

The Brown Honors Program core requirements are found in the Programs of Study section.

Units for Core: 10

Among the 32 units required for graduation, the following distribution of courses must also be fulfilled. These courses can count toward modes, categories, majors, minors and/or concentrations.

  • Two units in humanities (can be from same department): English, Modern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Honors
  • Two units in mathematics or natural sciences (can be from same department): Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Honors
  • Two units in social science (can be from same department): Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, Economics and Management, History, Political Science, Psychology, Honors
  • One unit in fine arts: Art and Art History, Music (including up to four 1/4-unit music ensembles), Theatre, Honors


Major Requirement: All students are required to complete an approved major.

  • Accounting
  • Anthropology
  • Anthropology and Sociology
  • Art (Studio Art)
  • Art History
  • Athletic Training
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Earth Science
  • Economics and Management
  • English
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Exercise Science
  • Finance
  • French
  • Geological Sciences
  • German
  • History
  • Individually Designed Major
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics/Economics
  • Mathematics/Physics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Policy
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Sustainability Studies
  • Theatre
  • Women's and Gender Studies

Units for Major: 8-10


Minors: Students may choose to complete a minor.

Departmental and Interdisciplinary Minors

  • Anthropology
    • Anthropology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Art
    • Art, Art History
  • Biology
    • Cell and Molecular Biology
    • Environmental Biology
  • Business and Organizations
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Economics and Management
    • Accounting—Corporate Track,
    • Economics, Finance, Management
  • Education
    • Educational Studies
  • English
  • Foreign Language
    • French, German,
    • Spanish
  • Gender Studies
  • Geological Sciences
    • Geology, Environmental
    • Geology, Geographic
    • Information Systems,
    • Paleontology
  • History
  • Mathematics
    • Mathematics,
    • Applied Mathematics,
    • Statistics,
    • Computer Science
  • Philosophy
    • Philosophy, History of
    • Philosophy, Philosophy
    • of Mind, Value Theory
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
    • Sociology,
    • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Theatre
  • Women's Studies


Concentrations: Students may also choose to complete a concentration designed to prepare them for specific careers. Some of these concentrations are linked to the College's Institutes and Centers, and, in these cases, students must be admitted to the respective Institute or Center to participate fully in its curriculum. The available concentrations are listed below.

Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Human Services
Law, Justice, and Society
Neuroscience
Public Policy and Service

Institutes, Centers, Programs

Prentiss M. Brown Honors Program
Center for Sustainability and the Environment
Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service
Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Business and Management
Institute for Healthcare Professions
Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development

General Electives: Electives are courses that do not count toward a specific program (such as a major) but contribute toward the total units needed for graduation.

Units for Electives: 12-14

Writing Competency Examination: All students must also pass the writing competence requirement before they graduate.

Total Units for Graduation: 32

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be required to withdraw from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing -- A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation -- A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation -- A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation -- Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. A student who fails to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation may be subject to required academic withdrawal.

Required Academic Withdrawal -- A student is subject to academic withdrawal if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic withdrawal if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds -- The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements -- A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence -- Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College -- Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission -- Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $50.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status) -- Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admissions Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be required to withdraw from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing -- A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation -- A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation -- A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation -- Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. A student who fails to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation may be subject to required academic withdrawal.

Required Academic Withdrawal -- A student is subject to academic withdrawal if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic withdrawal if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds -- The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements -- A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence -- Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College -- Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission -- Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status) -- Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing -- A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation -- A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation -- A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation -- Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension-- A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds -- The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements -- A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence -- Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College -- Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission -- Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status) -- Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Academic Status

The academic record of each student is reviewed at the close of the fall and spring semesters by the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions. Specific attention is given to the student's progress both in completing units of credit and in maintaining the minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average which are required for graduation from the College. Students who fail to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward graduation may be suspended from the College. The committee determines academic status and is guided in its decisions by the following standards:

Good Standing—A student whose semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.0 or above is considered to be in good standing.

Semester Probation—A student who has a semester grade point average below 2.0 for one semester and has a cumulative grade point average above 2.0 will be placed on semester probation.

Academic Probation—A student is placed on academic probation whenever his/her cumulative grade point average falls below the 2.0 level, or when the semester average falls below a 2.0 for two consecutive semesters, even though the cumulative average remains a 2.0 or above.

Terminal Academic Probation—Some students, because of their extremely low grade point averages, are classified under terminal academic probation and given a specific grade point average to obtain for their work during the following semester. Students on terminal academic probation for the first time are also required to successfully complete IDY 100: Academic Success during that semester. Students are subject to suspension if they fail to meet the requirements of terminal academic probation.

Academic Suspension—A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her academic progress does not meet either of the following minimums at the end of the semester listed:

1.00 with a minimum of 3 units completed at the end of the first semester of attendance;

1.62 with a minimum of 6 units completed at the end of the second semester of attendance;

1.75 with a minimum of 9 units completed at the end of the third semester of attendance;

1.81 with a minimum of 13 units completed at the end of the fourth semester of attendance;

1.90 with a minimum of 17 units completed at the end of the fifth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 21 units completed at the end of the sixth semester of attendance;

2.00 with a minimum of 25 units completed at the end of the seventh semester of attendance.

A student is also subject to academic suspension if he or she fails to obtain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 for work in three consecutive semesters, or meet the requirements of terminal academic probation. In cases where a student has not made sufficient progress toward a degree, he or she may be suspended without having been on terminal academic probation in the preceding semester.

Other Policies on Academic Status

Insufficient Progress toward Degree and Registration Holds—The College reserves the right to deny access to classes for students who make insufficient progress toward a degree. Students who are declared in a major, minor or concentration but make insufficient progress may be removed from that major, minor and/or concentration. Students who fail to declare a major by the end of their sophomore year will not be permitted to register. Normally, students complete degree requirements within eight semesters. If students have not completed graduation requirements within eight graded semesters, they must petition the Committee on Academic Status and Petitions for permission to continue enrollment for each additional semester needed to complete requirements.

Veteran's Requirements—A veteran or eligible person receiving VA benefits cannot be certified by Albion College as a student making satisfactory progress towards a degree if this student is on academic probation longer than two semesters. VA benefits will cease after two semesters of probation. The Veteran's Administration will be notified of any veteran who fails a course or who is not making satisfactory progress. In order to be recertified for veteran's benefits the student must remove all quality point deficiencies and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Leave of Absence—Leave of absence is a privilege that may be requested for those who desire to interrupt, but not to discontinue permanently, their enrollment at Albion for one or two semesters. Applications must be made in writing to the vice president for student affairs prior to the semester in which the student is requesting the leave of absence. A student who is granted a leave of absence may normally participate in enrollment procedures of regularly enrolled students for such considerations as registration, room lottery and applications for financial assistance. The student is expected to return to Albion following leave.

Voluntary Withdrawal from College—Students who wish to withdraw from the College during the semester (i.e., withdrawing after enrollment has been completed at the beginning of a semester and before the completion of final exams) should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Student Affairs Office and submitting a Mid-Semester Withdrawal Notification Form.

Readmission—Graduates or former students may apply for readmission to the College at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Applications for readmission are to be submitted at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to return. Students are charged a readmission fee of $60.

Nondegree Status (Special Student Status)—Applies to students enrolled for special programs designed to fill particular needs but not usually leading toward graduation. This status normally applies only to students at the freshman or sophomore level. Re-enrollment as a nondegree student is dependent upon the maintenance of a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course in which the student is enrolled. A nondegree student must submit appropriate credentials to the Admission Office one month in advance of registration. Nondegree students who wish to become candidates for the bachelor of arts degree must formally apply for admission to the College.

Trustees

Effective for the 2009-10 board year.

Frederick M. Adams, chairman-Michigan, Northern Trust Bank, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2011 T).

Carolyn E. Aishton, vice president, corporate programs (retired), Avon Products, Inc., New York, New York (2010 T).

Robert A. Armitage, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Indiana (2012 T).

Daniel Boggan, Jr., chief operating officer (retired), National Collegiate Athletic Association, Oakland, California (2011 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney, Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., East Lansing, Michigan (2010 A).

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, Greenville United Methodist Church, Greenville, Michigan (2010 WM).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2011 A).

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Berkeley, California (2012 T).  *Chair of the Audit Committee.

Anne H. Hunter, president, Marketing Source USA, Inc., Edina, Minnesota (2012 A). *Chair for the Committee on Enrollment and Marketing.

David K. Johnson, physician, Lansing Institute of Urology, East Lansing, Michigan (2011 A).

Jonathan D. Keaton, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (ex-officio).

Carol A. Leisenring, co-director, Financial Institutions Center, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2012 T). *Chair of the Investment Committee.

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair for the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Robert D. Musser III, president, The Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2010 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman, Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., Washington, DC (2010 T). *Chair for the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Jeffrey C. Petherick, founder/partner, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2011 T).

Donna M. Randall, president, Albion College.

Charles G. Raphael, executive vice president, retail banking group (retired), Bank One Corp., Williamsburg, Virginia (2012 A).

William A. Ritter, senior minister (retired), Birmingham First United Methodist Church, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2010 D). *Chair for the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen N. Sanney, recent graduate (2010 R).

William Schuette, senior counsel, Warner, Norcross & Judd, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2010 T).

Joseph O. Serra, president, Serra Automotive, Grand Blanc, Michigan (2012 T).

Thomas C. Shearer, J.D., president, Thomas C. Shearer, P.C., Grand Rapids, Michigan (2012 WM).

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2012 T). *Chair of the Infrastructure Committee.

Richard M. Smith, chairman, Newsweek, New York, New York. (2011 T).

William K. Stoffer, chief executive officer, Albion Machine and Tool Company, Albion, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair for the Committee on Institutional Advancement.

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair of the Board.

Jennifer L. Toteff, recent graduate (2011 R)

John N. Vournakis, vice president for research and development, Marine Polymer Technologies, Charleston, South Carolina (2011 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T--elected by the Board of Trustees; A--elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D--elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM--elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R--recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, White Plains, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Tecumseh, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board,
Norwalk, Connecticut.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Iron Mountain,
Michigan.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, Michigan.

John S. Ludington, chairman emeritus, Dow Corning Corporation, Midland,
Michigan.

Paul W. McCracken, Edmund Ezra Day professor of business administration, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

John W. Porter, education consultant (retired), Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Lansing, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Trustees

Effective for the 2015-16 board year.

Kevin F. Asher, partner assurance services, Ernst and Young, LLP, San Jose, California (2016 T).

Joseph S. Calvaruso, executive director, Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2016 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney (retired), Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., Okemos, Michigan (2016 A). *Chair of the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, First United Methodist Church, Kalamazoo, Michigan (2016 WM).

Mauri A. Ditzler, president, Albion College, Albion, Michigan.

Mae Ola Dunklin, director (retired), Fritz Shurmur Center for Teacher Development, Albion College, Albion, Michigan (2018 T).

Faith E. Fowler, executive director, Cass Community Social Services, Detroit, MI (2016 D).

Douglas R. Goering, professor of art, emeritus, Albion College, Flint, Michigan (2018 T).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2017 A).

Michael J. Harrington, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana (2018 T). *Chair of the Committee for Institutional Advancement.

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Suttons Bay, Michigan (2018 T). *Chair of the Audit and Compliance Committee.

Deborah L. Kiesey, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (2018).

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2017 T). *Chair of the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman (retired), Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., McLean, Virginia (2016 T). *Chair of the Committee for Enrollment and Marketing.

Jeffrey A. Ott, attorney, Warner Norcross & Judd, LLP, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2018 T).

Jeffrey C. Petherick, portfolio manager, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2017 T).

Lawrence B. Schook, vice president for research, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois (2018 T). *Chair of the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Johanna B. Schulte, ’15, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2018 R).

Samuel J. Shaheen, surgeon, Saginaw, Michigan (2017 T). *Chair of the Committee on Infrastructure.

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2018 T). *Chair of the Board.

Donald W. Strite, ’14, staff auditor, Ernst and Young, Detroit, Michigan (2016 R).

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2017 T).

Dennis W. Wahr, president and CEO, Holaira, Inc., Plymouth, Minnesota (2016 T).

Jeffrey D. Weedman, CEO/CBW, Cintrifuse (retired), Cincinnati, Ohio (2017 T).

James M. Wilson, professor and director, Gene Therapy Program, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2017 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T—elected by the Board of Trustees; A—elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D—elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM—elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R—recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, Palatine, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer (retired), Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, Armonk, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Petoskey, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board, Tucson, Arizona.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Florence, Wisconsin.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Stowe, Vermont.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Byron Center, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

Trustees

Effective for the 2009-10 board year.

Frederick M. Adams, chairman-Michigan, Northern Trust Bank, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2011 T).

Carolyn E. Aishton, vice president, corporate programs (retired), Avon Products, Inc., New York, New York (2010 T).

Robert A. Armitage, senior vice president and general counsel, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Indiana (2012 T).

Daniel Boggan, Jr., chief operating officer (retired), National Collegiate Athletic Association, Oakland, California (2011 T).

Diane S. Carr, attorney, Brookover and Carr, and Schaberg P.C., East Lansing, Michigan (2010 A).

Stephen M.G. Charnley, pastor, Greenville United Methodist Church, Greenville, Michigan (2010 WM).

Stephen I. Greenhalgh, attorney, Bodman, L.L.P., Detroit, Michigan (2011 A).

Robert B. Hetler, partner (retired), PricewaterhouseCoopers, L.L.P., Berkeley, California (2012 T).  *Chair of the Audit Committee.

Anne H. Hunter, president, Marketing Source USA, Inc., Edina, Minnesota (2012 A). *Chair for the Committee on Enrollment and Marketing.

David K. Johnson, physician, Lansing Institute of Urology, East Lansing, Michigan (2011 A).

Jonathan D. Keaton, bishop, Michigan Area, United Methodist Church, Okemos, Michigan (ex-officio).

Carol A. Leisenring, co-director, Financial Institutions Center, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2012 T). *Chair of the Investment Committee.

Thomas L. Ludington, judge, U.S. District Court, Bay City, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair for the Committee on Finance and Business Affairs.

Robert D. Musser III, president, The Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan (2010 A).

Mark E. Newell, J.D., vice chairman, Latham & Watkins, L.L.P., Washington, DC (2010 T). *Chair for the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs.

Jeffrey C. Petherick, founder/partner, Northpointe Capital, Troy, Michigan (2011 T).

Donna M. Randall, president, Albion College.

Charles G. Raphael, executive vice president, retail banking group (retired), Bank One Corp., Williamsburg, Virginia (2012 A).

William A. Ritter, senior minister (retired), Birmingham First United Methodist Church, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (2010 D). *Chair for the Committee on Trusteeship.

Stephen N. Sanney, recent graduate (2010 R).

William Schuette, senior counsel, Warner, Norcross & Judd, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2010 T).

Joseph O. Serra, president, Serra Automotive, Grand Blanc, Michigan (2012 T).

Thomas C. Shearer, J.D., president, Thomas C. Shearer, P.C., Grand Rapids, Michigan (2012 WM).

J. Donald Sheets, chief financial officer, Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan (2012 T). *Chair of the Infrastructure Committee.

Richard M. Smith, chairman, Newsweek, New York, New York. (2011 T).

William K. Stoffer, chief executive officer, Albion Machine and Tool Company, Albion, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair for the Committee on Institutional Advancement.

Paul D. Tobias, chairman and chief executive officer, Mackinac Financial Corporation & mBank, Birmingham, Michigan (2011 T). *Chair of the Board.

Jennifer L. Toteff, recent graduate (2011 R)

John N. Vournakis, vice president for research and development, Marine Polymer Technologies, Charleston, South Carolina (2011 T).

The year in parentheses after each name indicates the date the individual's term on the Board of Trustees expires. T--elected by the Board of Trustees; A--elected by the Albion College Alumni Association; D--elected by the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church; WM--elected by the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church. R--recent graduate trustee .

*Indicates officer of the Board of Trustees.

Honorary Trustees

Richard L. Baird, partner, Global ABAS Operations, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, Illinois.

David M. Barrett, chief executive officer, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Prentiss M. Brown, Jr., partner, Brown & Brown attorneys, St. Ignace, Michigan.

Chris T. Christ, attorney, Battle Creek, Michigan.

William C. Ferguson, Verizon Communications, White Plains, New York.

Janet M. Goudie, fashion consultant, Doncaster, Rochester, Michigan

Todd W. Herrick, president and chief executive officer (retired), Tecumseh Products Company, Tecumseh, Michigan.

Edmund L. Jenkins, chairman (retired), Financial Accounting Standards Board,
Norwalk, Connecticut.

James A. Klungness, president (retired), Cable Constructors, Inc., Iron Mountain,
Michigan.

Bruce A. Kresge, physician (retired), Lake Angelus, Michigan.

Arnold G. Langbo, chairman (retired), Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, Michigan.

John S. Ludington, chairman emeritus, Dow Corning Corporation, Midland,
Michigan.

Paul W. McCracken, Edmund Ezra Day professor of business administration, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Alan W. Ott, chairman of the board (retired), Chemical Financial Corporation,
Midland, Michigan.

John W. Porter, education consultant (retired), Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Judy Dow Rumelhart, vocalist, director, producer, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Andrew G. Sharf, cardiovascular surgeon, Santa Ynez, California.

Justin L. Sleight, ophthalmologist (retired), Lansing, Michigan.

Wendell B. Will, president, Capital Ideas, Glendale, California.

Jess Womack, interim general counsel, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, California.

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