Music

Faculty

Andrew O. Bishop, chair and associate professor.
B.M. (music theory-composition), 1993, B.M. (saxophone performance), 1993, Wichita State University; M.M. (music composition), 1995, M.M. (music improvisation), 1995, D.M.A. (music composition), 2001, University of Michigan. Studied composition with William Albright, William Bolcom, Evan Chambers, Michael Daugherty and Walter Mays, and jazz with Ellen Rowe, Ed Sarath and Reggie Workman. Appointed 1999.

David W. Abbott, associate professor.
B.M., Eastman School of Music; M.M., The Juilliard School; D.M.A., Eastman School of Music. Appointed 2005.

Maureen Balke, professor.
B.A., 1974, Marquette University; B.M., 1978, M.M., 1980, D.M. (vocal performance and pedagogy), 1991, Indiana University. Teachers and coaches include Lorna Warfield, Martha Lipton, Gianna d'Angelo and Carol Smith, Martin Katz, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Dalton Baldwin, Gerhard Hüsch. Post-doctoral studies at the CIFM International Music Institute in Nice, France; the Mozart Opera Studies Institute in Kaprun, Austria; the Aston Magna Academy on Schubert (NEH Fellowship); the Schubert Lied and Keyboard Festival, Westminster Choir College; and the International Festival of the Art Song. Appointed 1988.

James S. Ball, associate professor.
B.M. (trombone), 1974, Oberlin Conservatory of Music; M.M. (trombone), 1982, Georgia State University; M.M. (orchestral conducting), 1983, Northwestern University; D.M.A. (orchestral conducting), 1992, Conservatory of Music, University of Missouri-Kansas City. Appointed 1999.

Samuel D. McIlhagga, assistant professor.
B.Mus.Ed., 1992, Grand Valley State University; M.M. (wind conducting), 1993, Northwestern University; Ph.D. (music education), University of Minnesota. Appointed 2003.

Douglas R. Rose, associate professor.
B.M., B.Mus.Ed., 1982, Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada); M.M. (choral conducting), M.A. (music and worship), 1989, Yale University; D.M.A. (choral conducting), 1994, State University of New York, Stony Brook. Appointed 1996.

Applied Music Faculty

Takeshi Abo, adjunct instructor, violin and viola.
B.M. (violin performance), 1994, Kyoto City University of Arts; M.M. (violin performance), 1997; D.M.A. (violin performance), 2006, Michigan State University.

Emily Benner, adjunct instructor, voice.
B.M., 1995, M.M., 1997, D.M.A., 2005, University of Michigan.

Robert Doyle, adjunct instructor, voice.
B.M., 1985, Michigan State University; M.M., 1992, University of Texas, Austin; M.M. candidate in organ and church music, University of Michigan.

Cynthia Duda, adjunct instructor, bassoon.
B.M., 1999, Bowling Green State University; M.M., 2003, Western Michigan University; D.M.A. candidate, Michigan State University.

Ed Fedewa, adjunct instructor, string bass.
B.A., 1991, Michigan State University; M.A., 1993, Michigan State University.

Paul Forsyth, adjunct instructor, saxophone.
B.M., 2000, University of Tennessee; M.M., 2003, D.M.A. candidate, Michigan State University.

David Gilliland, accompanist.
B.M. (piano performance/composition), 1997, DePauw University; M.M. (collaborative piano), 1999, Eastman School of Music; D.M.A. (collaborative piano), 2004, University of Minnesota.

Ruth Goveia, accompanist and adjunct instructor, piano.
B.M.(Ed.), University of the Free State, South Africa; M.M. (Piano), University of Cincinnati; D.M. (Piano), Indiana University, Bloomington.

Ellen Grafius, adjunct instructor, harp.
B.M.E., 1970, Michigan State University.

Jin Sook Hong, adjunct instructor, voice.
M.M., 1983, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea; M.M., 1994, Oakland University; D.M.A., 2000, University of Michigan.

Lia Jensen-Abbott, accompanist and adjunct instructor, piano.
B.M. (piano performance), University of Nebraska-Lincoln; M.M. (piano performance and pedagogy), Pennsylvania State University; D.M.A. (piano performance), 2005, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; candidate for Performer Diploma, Indiana State University.

Stacey Renee Jones, adjunct instructor, percussion.
B.M., 1994, University of Oregon; M.M., 1996, University of Indiana, Pennsylvania; D.M.A. candidate, Michigan State University.

John King, adjunct instructor, voice and opera workshop.
B.M.E., 1972, Central Michigan University; M.M., 1974, University of Colorado.

Christopher Kirkpatrick, adjunct instructor, clarinet.
B.M., 2000, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; M.M., 2003, University of New Mexico; D.M.A. candidate, Michigan State University.

Jonathan Kretschmer, adjunct instructor, trumpet.
B.M., 2002, Indiana University; M.M., 2004, The Juilliard School.

Tess Miller, adjunct instructor, flute.
M.M., 2001, D.M.A., 2004, Michigan State University.

Russell Nebelung, adjunct instructor, guitar.

James Otto, adjunct instructor, horn.

Emily Schaefer, adjunct instructor, cello.
B.M., 2000, Western Michigan University; M.M., 2004, Mannes College of Music.

Elena Melinda Solero, piano accompanist.
B.M., 1982, DePauw University; M.M., 1984, Bowling Green State University.

Bobby Streng, adjunct instructor, saxophone.
B.M. (saxophone performance), 2002, University of Dayton; M.M. (saxophone performance), 2004, University of Michigan.

Rebecca Van de Ven, adjunct instructor, oboe.
B.S., 1998, University of Wisconsin, Madison; M.M., 2002, San Francisco Conservatory.

Larry Williams, adjunct instructor, guitar.
A.A., Jackson Community College; B.A., Spring Arbor College.

Introduction

Music is one of the oldest disciplines in the liberal arts, and thus represents one of the traditional fields of knowledge. Integration with other disciplines is represented well within the department, for music brings people in contact with great literature such as drama and poetry, with dance, with historical and sociological trends, and with religious and philosophical ideas.

One of the most important contributions provided by the Music Department is the opportunity for self-expression, either individually or with  others. The stimulation and enjoyment derived from music springs from study, self-examination and criticism, discipline, knowledge of other disciplines that bear upon musical interpretation, and a desire to achieve excellence. These are liberating, civilizing, sensitizing influences upon humanity in any age and in any place; they help prepare students for rich and rewarding lives.

The philosophy and mission of Albion College are reflected in four primary goals of the Music Department: (1) To be an artistic presence on the campus and to share the rich heritage of great music with students, faculty and community; (2) To expose students to and involve them with the creative process through music, to heighten students' sensitivity to themselves and others, and to introduce them to a broad range of significant music; (3) To develop an understanding of music, impart knowledge of music and increase musical skills by means of courses offered within the framework of the liberal arts; (4) To provide courses and curricula for music majors so they may have the necessary foundation for graduate study, teaching, performing, or other career-oriented goals.

The Music Department offers courses for a broad range of students--from those who aspire to a musical career to those who wish to develop their avocational interests in music. Membership in all performing ensembles and opportunities for private music lessons are open to all students regardless of major. Albion has an excellent library of books, musical scores, recordings and stereo listening equipment--all available for student use. Albion College is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

The Music Department offers three music curricula: (1) music major; (2) music major with performance emphasis; and (3) music major with music education emphasis. These programs are listed below with an explanation of the purpose and the requirements for each.

Music Department Web site

Career Opportunities

Career possibilities for Albion music graduates include public and private school teaching, private teaching, music management, church music and professional performance. Many of our music graduates elect to attend graduate school to further prepare themselves for their chosen careers.

Special Features

Interested students may take advantage of off-campus study and apprenticeships made available through the GLCA in New York and Philadelphia. The department also has internships at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., the Lyric Opera of Chicago, The Midwest Opera Co. of St. Paul and the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. Foreign study is available as well.

Vocal students are regularly sent to state and regional National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) competitions. They also take part in a musical and/or opera workshop on an annual basis. Opportunities for instrumentalists include the Intercollegiate Honor Band and apprenticeships (for string players) with the Jackson Symphony Orchestra.

Requirements for Major (8 units)

The eight-unit liberal arts music major is for students who have strong musical interests but who do not necessarily intend to pursue a full-time professional career in music. This major may not be used as a major in the elementary or secondary education program. Students interested in teaching music in the public schools should enroll in the 12 1/2 unit music major with music education emphasis. Students should begin their study by enrolling in the following courses in the fall: Music 101, an applied music lesson (one-half unit) and a departmental ensemble. If enrolling in the ensemble for credit will cause a student to exceed 4.5 units the ensemble may be audited.

Students selecting this curriculum must complete eight units in music as follows:

  • Four units in music theory: 101, 102, 201 and 202.
  • Two units in music history: 313, 314.
  • Two units in applied music (private lessons). One-half unit in conducting may be substituted for one-half unit in applied music by permission of music staff.
  • All courses for the major must be taken for a numerical grade.

In addition:

  • Students are expected to take applied music lessons each semester they are in residence.
  • Students are required to participate in at least one of the major performing organizations most appropriate to their primary performance medium (marching/symphonic band, orchestra, choir, jazz ensemble) each semester the student is enrolled in this curriculum. Keyboard performers may satisfy this requirement through accompanying; guitarists should make special arrangements with the chair of the Music Department.
  • Students must attend seven approved campus recitals and concerts per semester. Specific details concerning approved recitals and concerts and other information is in the Music Department Student Handbook and may be obtained from the Music Department Office.
  • Successful completion of the keyboard laboratories in 101, 102, 201 and 202 will satisfy the piano proficiency requirement.

Requirements for Major with Performance Emphasis (12 1/2 units)

The music major with performance emphasis is for students who intend to study music within a broad spectrum of liberal arts studies. The emphasis in performance may lead to a career in music as a private music teacher, church musician or performer or provide preparation for graduate school. It is assumed that this introductory course sequence will be supplemented by further studies in music. Students should begin their study by enrolling in the following courses in the fall: Music 101, an applied music lesson (one-half unit), and a departmental ensemble. If enrolling in the ensemble for credit will cause a student to exceed four and one-half units, the ensemble may be audited.

Students selecting this curriculum must complete 12 1/2 units in music as follows:

  • Seven and one-half units in music: 101, 102, 201, 202, 215, 313, 314 and 401.
  • Four units in applied music (private lessons). Students must enroll for one-half unit each semester. During any semester that an off-campus program is elected, students are expected to arrange to take applied study.
  • One unit elective in voice/piano/instrument classes, pedagogy, church music, literature or conducting. Vocal performance students are encouraged to elect Diction for Singers during their freshman or sophomore year.
  • All courses for the major with performance emphasis must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • At the end of the first semester of the sophomore year, students' performance level and academic progress toward the major will be evaluated by the faculty.
  • Students at the senior level will present a full solo recital, or combination solo recital and small ensemble performance in which he or she is a participant in solo capacity. With the approval of the department, a research paper or project may be elected in lieu of the senior recital. The Music Department also encourages a recital, either entire or shared, at the junior level.
  • Students are required to participate in at least one of the major music performing organizations most appropriate to their primary performance medium each semester (marching/symphonic band, orchestra, choir, jazz ensemble). Keyboard performers may satisfy this requirement through accompanying; guitarists should make special arrangements with the chair of the Music Department.
  • Students must attend seven approved campus recitals and concerts per semester. A student attending Albion for four years must attend 56 concerts/recitals to graduate. Specific details concerning approved recitals and concerts and other information is in the Music Department Student Handbook and may be obtained from the Music Department Office.
  • Successful completion of the 101, 102, 201 and 202 keyboard laboratories will satisfy the piano proficiency requirement.

Requirements for Major with Music Education Emphasis (12 1/2 units)

The major with music education emphasis provides certification for students who intend to teach music in grades K-12 for private and public schools. Students should begin their study by enrolling in the following courses in the fall: Music 101, an applied music lesson (one-half unit) and a departmental ensemble. If enrolling in the ensemble for credit will cause a student to exceed four and one-half units the ensemble may be audited.

Students selecting this curriculum must complete 12 1/2 units in music as follows:

  • Major--Seven and one-half units in music: 101, 102, 201, 202, 215, 313, 314 and 401.
  • Music Education Minor (required for teaching certificate)--Five units in specialized music performance courses, including three and one-half units in applied music (at least three units must be in a single performing area); one-half unit in voice/piano/guitar classes; one-half unit in Music 230; and one-half unit in Music 330 or 331. Specific recommendations for students whose principal performing area is keyboard, voice or an instrument are available from the Music Department.
  • During any semester that an off-campus program is elected, students are expected to arrange to take applied study.
  • Teacher Certification Requirements--Students in this curriculum must complete the required units of professional education courses taken through the Shurmur Institute. Vocal students must elect Education 225, 251, 260, 325, 328, 353, 363 and 369 plus one and one-half units selected from Education 240-246. Instrumental students must elect Education 225, 251, 260, 322, 325, 353, 363 and 369 plus one and one-half units selected from Education 240-246. (Certification for secondary vocal music education alone requires one unit less than the K-12 music certification. Students interested in this alternative should contact the Music Department for specific details.)
  • In order to complete the music education program in four years, students wishing to go off-campus should only do so in the fall semester.
  • All courses for the major with music education emphasis must be taken for a numerical grade.
  • At the end of the first semester of the sophomore year, students' performance level and academic progress toward the major will be evaluated by the faculty.
  • Students at the senior level will present a full solo recital, or combination solo recital and small ensemble performance in which he or she is a participant in solo capacity. With the approval of the department, a research paper or project may be elected in lieu of the senior recital. The Music Department also encourages a recital, either entire or shared, at the junior level.
  • Students are required to participate in at least one of the major music performing organizations most appropriate to their primary performance medium, each semester (marching/symphonic band, orchestra, choir, jazz ensemble). Keyboard performers may satisfy this requirement through accompanying; guitarists should make special arrangements with the chair of the Music Department.
  • Students must attend seven approved campus recitals and concerts per semester. A student attending Albion for four years must attend 56 concerts/recitals to graduate. Specific details concerning approved recitals and concerts, carryover of excess credits or of deficits, and other information is in the Music Department Student Handbook and may be obtained from the Music Department Office or online at http://www.albion.edu/music/ (look under "Music Majors").
  • Successful completion of the 101, 102, 201 and 202 keyboard laboratories will satisfy the piano proficiency requirement.

Courses

101 Theory I (1) Fall
Prerequisite: Open only to music majors, or with permission of instructor.
An introduction to Western musical language through studies in fundamentals (key signatures, intervals, scales, rhythmic notation, etc.), chordal and melodic structures, and basic four-part harmonization. Focuses on intensive training in sight-singing (with solfege) and ear-training activities, an introduction to music software for notation and ear training, and development of keyboard proficiency through participation in a required weekly keyboard laboratory. Keyboard laboratory sessions concentrate on basic reading and harmonization skills at the keyboard, as well as development of the technical ability to perform elementary repertoire. Lecture and keyboard laboratory. Abbott, Beaton, Jenson.

102 Theory I (1) Spring
Prerequisite: Music 101 or advanced placement by means of a departmental examination.
A continuation of studies begun in Music 101, with emphasis on further exercises in and analysis of four-part harmonization, secondary chord function, musical form and exercises in stylized composition. Sight-singing, ear-training and technology application continue. Keyboard laboratory sessions continue to develop reading, harmonization, and basic theory skills as related to piano playing. Further development of technical skills allows the study of early intermediate repertoire. Lecture and keyboard laboratory. Abbott, Beaton, Jenson.

110 The History of Rock (1) Fall
Study of the origins, characteristics and stylistic development of rock-and-roll music from the early 1950s to the present. Designed for the non-music major. Staff.

111 Music Appreciation (1) Fall, Spring
Designed for the non-music major who wishes to gain an appreciation of music as a fine art. The musical elements of style, form and design are investigated primarily through listening. Not open to music majors. Miller.

113 Introduction to Opera (1) Spring
An introductory course designed for both the music major and non-major. Concentrates on the most frequently performed operas of Mozart, Puccini, Verdi and Wagner. Extensive use of video tapes of opera performances with sub-titles. Alternate years--offered 2009-10. Staff.

119 Evolution of Jazz (1) Spring
An exploration of the rich cultural background and evolution of jazz music through discussion of important performers, composers, educators and critics with respect to their contribution to the development of the art form. Emphasis is placed on developing critical listening skills through the extensive use of landmark recordings and live performances. Staff.

120 Music Performance as a Creative Process (1) Spring
Prerequisites: Music 121, 122, 124, 125, 131 or 132.
Designed to give students the tools necessary to think, discuss and write critically about music both within and outside of their respective ensemble "labs."  Through reading, writing and listening assignments, students will become more aware of the elements involved in musical interpretation. Staff.

133 Opera Workshop (1/2) Spring
Provides opportunity for involvement in the production of operas or opera scenes from auditions through performance. Covers all aspects of opera from vocal roles to technical support. Offered in alternate years. Staff.

137 Piano Chamber Music Ensemble (1/2) Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: Music major and permission of instructor.
Develops ensemble skills for pianists playing in duos with a second pianist or in mixed ensembles such as trios for piano and strings, etc. Topics include balance, rhythmic precision and pedaling, as well as overall phrasing and interpretation. Abbott, Jensen, Goveia.

192 Guitar Class I (1/4) Fall, Spring
Basic development of both classical and plectrum guitar skills. Intended for students with little or no previous training. No applied music tuition fee charged. Williams.

193 Guitar Class II (1/4) Fall, Spring
Prerequisite: Guitar Class I or permission of instructor.
A continuation in the development of music reading skills using easy classical, traditional tunes and technical exercises. No applied music tuition fee charged. Williams.

194 Guitar Class III (1/4) Fall, Spring
Prerequisite: Guitar Class II or permission of instructor.
A continuation of Guitar Class II. No applied music tuition fee charged. Williams.

197 Piano Class (1/4) Spring
Open only to music majors. Required of vocal music education majors. (While not required for instrumental music education majors, it is highly recommended.) Focuses on accompanying choral rehearsals. Demonstrates how accompaniments can be reduced and simplified in order to lead a choral rehearsal from the piano. Staff.

198 Voice Class (1/4) Spring
Open only to music majors. Required of instrumental music education majors. (While not required for vocal music education majors, it is highly recommended.) A study of the vocal mechanism and practice in the techniques of teaching vocal production and breath support/management as applied to solo and choral singing. Staff.

201 Theory II (1) Fall
Prerequisite: Music 102 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of the studies begun in Music 101 and 102 with a special emphasis on chromatic harmony. A further study of form and exercises in stylized composition. Sight-singing and ear-training continue. Bishop.

202 Theory II (1) Spring
Prerequisite: Music 201 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of the studies begun in Music 101, 102 and 201 with a special emphasis on form. An introduction to the materials and techniques of twentieth and twenty-first-century music. Sight-singing and ear-training continue. A major analysis paper is required. Bishop.

205 Jazz Improvisation (1) Spring
Prerequisite: Music 101 recommended.
An introduction to the art and craft of jazz improvisation through a study of the theoretical, historical, philosophical and aesthetic factors surrounding its past, present and future performance practice. Course material is designed to develop thinking and reacting skills needed for performance through assignments in repertoire, scales, keyboard harmony skills and melodic patterns. Bishop.

215 Orchestration (1) Spring
Prerequisite: Music 102.
A study of instrumental orchestration techniques and significant score study. The final project will be an orchestration for a large ensemble/or a vocal arrangement. Alternate years--offered 2009-10. Staff.

230 Introduction to Conducting (1/2) Spring
Prerequisite: Music 102 or permission of instructor.
Fundamentals of conducting vocal and instrumental ensembles. (1) basic beat patterns; (2) score analysis; (3) instrument and voice ranges and transpositions; and (4) some practical aspects of rehearsing. Lecture and laboratory. Ball.

240 Brass Instruments (1/4) Fall
Practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of the high brass (trumpet and French horn). Alternate years--offered 2008-09. Staff.

241 Brass Instruments (1/4) Spring
Practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of the low brass (euphonium, trombone and tuba). Alternate years--offered 2008-09. Staff.

242 Woodwind Instruments (1/4) Fall
Practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of single reed woodwinds (clarinet, saxophone) and flute. Alternate years--offered 2009-10. Staff.

243 Woodwind Instruments (1/4) Spring
Practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of double reed woodwinds (oboe, bassoon). Alternate years--offered 2009-10. Staff.

244 Stringed Instruments (1/4) Fall
Practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of the violin and viola. Alternate years--offered 2009-10. Staff.

245 Stringed Instruments (1/4) Spring
Practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of the cello and bass. Alternate years--offered 2009-10. Staff.

246 Percussion Instruments (1/4) Fall
Practical methods in the teaching and playing techniques of percussion instruments. Alternate years--offered 2008-09. Staff.

313 Music History I (1) Fall
Prerequisite: Music 201 or permission of instructor.
A course in the history of music designed for junior and senior music majors.
Covers music from the ancient Greeks through the seventeenth century. In addition to regular examinations, assignments stress stylistic characteristics of a period or of an individual composer. There is assigned listening. Bishop.

314 Music History II (1) Spring
Prerequisite: Music 313 or permission of instructor.
A continuation of Music 313 covering music from the eighteenth century to the present. In addition to examinations and analysis assignments, students complete a major research paper by the end of the semester that investigates some aspect of contemporary Western music or deal with non-Western music. Bishop.

322 Teaching of Instrumental Music in the Schools (1) Spring
Prerequisite: Music 230.
Required of all instrumental music education majors. Designed to acquaint the student with all aspects of teaching, developing, planning, directing and administering public school instrumental music programs, K-12. Alternate years--offered 2009-10. McIlhagga.

325 Teaching of Music in the Elementary School (1) Spring
Prerequisite: Music 230.
Designed to give the student a knowledge of a well-rounded music program for the elementary grades. Creative experiences, demonstrations and practical work in performing and listening are stressed. Lecture and laboratory. Alternate years--offered 2008-09. Staff.

328 Teaching of Choral Music in the Secondary School (1) Fall
Prerequisite: Music 230; Music 330 is strongly recommended.
An introduction to all aspects of the music program for the secondary school and the techniques for administering the program. Lecture and laboratory. It is strongly recommended that Music 330 (Choral Conducting) be elected prior to 328. Alternate years--offered 2008-09. Rose.

330 Choral Conducting (1/2) Fall
Prerequisite: Music 230.
Laboratory work in choral conducting and score reading with practical experience in techniques of training choral ensembles. Required of all choral music education majors. Alternate years-- offered 2008-09. Rose.

331 Instrumental Conducting (1/2) Fall
Prerequisite: Music 230.
Laboratory work to develop techniques and skills required for instrumental conducting and score reading. Students may be given the opportunity to conduct instrumental ensembles on campus. Required of all instrumental music education majors. Alternate years--offered 2008-09. Ball.

388, 389 Selected Topics (1/2, 1)
Many courses from the Music Department are offered to meet the evolving needs and interests of students. Examples of topics that have been offered are: Piano Literature, Organ Literature, Song Literature, Piano Pedagogy, Marching Band Techniques, Arranging, Composition, Orchestration, Music since 1945, Diction for Singers, Vocal Pedagogy, Opera Workshop. Staff.

391, 392 Individually Supervised Internships (1/2, 1) Fall, Spring
Offered on a credit no credit basis. Staff.

401, 402 Seminar (1/2, 1) Fall, Spring
Staff.

411, 412 Directed Study (1/2, 1) Fall, Spring
Staff.

Ensembles

Students performing in ensembles have the option of electing them for credit or not for credit. If credit registration would cause the unit enrollment to exceed four and one-half, the student may elect an audit registration, for which no fee will be assessed. Up to two units of ensemble credit
may be included among the total required for graduation.

121 Marching Band/Symphonic Band (1/4) Fall
Open to all wind or percussion students by audition. Auditions are held one week prior to the beginning of the fall semester during pre-season rehearsals. After marching season, students continue in symphonic band until the end of the semester. Staff.

122 Symphonic Band (1/4) Spring
Available for all wind or percussion students. Admission is by audition given during November and/or the first week of the spring semester. Staff.

124 Jazz Ensemble (1/4) Fall, Spring
Available to wind and percussion students interested in playing all styles of jazz. Admission is by audition given during the first week of classes. Ball.

125 Symphony Orchestra (1/4) Fall, Spring
Open to all students by audition. Auditions are held the first week of each semester; students should bring one prepared solo. Ball.

126 String Ensembles (1/4) Fall, Spring
Open to string students and pianists who are interested in performing chamber music. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Permission of instructor required. Staff.

127 Woodwind Ensembles (1/4) Fall, Spring
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Available for woodwind students who are interested in performing chamber music from all periods. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Staff.

128 Brass Ensembles (1/4) Fall, Spring
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Available for brass students who are interested in performing brass chamber music. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Staff.

129 Percussion Ensemble (1/4) Fall, Spring
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Available for percussion students who are interested in playing music for percussion. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Staff.

130 Guitar Ensemble (1/4) Fall, Spring
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Open to all guitar students who are interested in performing chamber music. Rehearsals are by arrangement. Williams.

131 Concert Choir (1/4) Fall, Spring
Open to all students by audition. Auditions are held during the first four days of classes in the fall. Rose.

132 Briton Singers (1/4) Fall, Spring
Members are selected from the Concert Choir by audition during the first week of classes in the fall. Rose.

Applied Music (private lessons)

Students who wish to elect private lessons must register for them during the regular College registration period. The appropriate course numbers for the private lessons are listed in the online Class Schedule. Students may not elect more than 1/2 unit in applied music unless a written request for permission is submitted and approved by the Music Department. All students enrolled in applied music must elect it for credit and take jury examinations at the conclusion of each semester of study. Fees are listed in the Tuition and Fees section. Non-music majors are encouraged to elect applied music. Students enroll for organ study by permission of instructor.

Lessons in piano, voice, organ, guitar, and all other string, percussion, woodwind and brass instruments offered. Each 1/4 or 1/2 unit.

One 1/2-hour lesson per week plus 6 hours practice--1/4 unit.
One one-hour lesson per week plus 12 hours practice--1/2 unit.